Tag Archives: Graphic design

Playing Cards that Explore 4 Distinct Moments in Art and Design History

ArtAndMachine_RH_Website_032317“This deck of cards is a look at four specific moments in the history of art and design as it has wrestled to incorporate machine technology (or push against it). Each suit in the deck focuses on one of these four moments—the new typography of the Bauhaus era, mid-century book cover design, the late 20th century silk-screened poster aesthetic, and contemporary art & design in the age of mobile.”ArtAndMachine_RH_Website_032317ArtAndMachine_RH_Website_032317ArtAndMachine_RH_Website_032317

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F37 Jan

f37_jan_fontJan is a lovely new font by Rick Banks for the F37 Foundry and exclusively sold at Hype For Type. Inspired by Jan Tschichold’s geometric sans-serif and Matthew Carter’s Bell Centennial font, F37 Jan features pronounced ink traps. The font contains alternatives and covers an extensive range of Latin-based languages, including Western and Eastern European.

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Studio Feixen

Studio Feixen is an independent Design Studio based in Lucerne, Switzerland that creates visual concepts. We focus specifically on nothing in particular. Whether it’s graphic design, interior design, fashion design, type design or animation – as long as it challenges us – we are interested. We work internationally with clients like Nike, Google, Reebok or The New York Times as well as more locally with institutions like Wanderlust or the Nuits Sonores Festival in France, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Südpol or the Luzerner Theater.https://i1.wp.com/www.studiofeixen.ch/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/VLOW-StudioFeixen-Book-1.pnghttps://i1.wp.com/www.studiofeixen.ch/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/VLOW-StudioFeixen-2and3.pnghttps://i2.wp.com/www.studiofeixen.ch/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/BringYourGame-StudioFeixen-39-1.pnghttps://i0.wp.com/www.studiofeixen.ch/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/BringYourGame-StudioFeixen-33.pnghttps://i0.wp.com/www.studiofeixen.ch/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/NuitsSonores-StudioFeixen-Impression-3.pnghttps://i1.wp.com/www.studiofeixen.ch/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/NuitsSonores-StudioFeixen-Shirt-4.png

More designs at http://www.studiofeixen.ch/

AllCreative

“AllCreative has a simple ambition,” says its founder, AMV BBDO creative chief Paul Brazier, “To reveal every creative job in the form of a short film that will inspire people a step closer to their chosen career. From a young age, I was given the impression that the creative arts were secondary and inferior to an academic career path. Later in life, I realised just how huge the creative industries are and their importance to Britain.”

Royal Mail releases Agatha Christie stamps with ‘hidden clues’

The set of six stamps were created by Jim Sutherland of Studio Sutherl & and illustrator Neil Webb and include elements that react to UV light and heat.

One of the six Agatha Christie stamps by Royal Mail
And Then There Were None: A poem, key to the plot, is the moon’s reflection, and the mysterious U.N.Owen appears at the lit window.

Miss Marple investigates a body found in the library.
Miss Marple investigates a body found in the Library

Agatha Christie stamps by Royal Mail
There’s a killer in the shadows, and Poirot looks on from the flames

One of the six Agatha Christie stamps by Royal Mail
Murder on The Orient Express: Don’t be distracted by the red kimono character, she distracts the viewer from the killer hidden behind a heat sensitive ink curtain. The curtain disappears when the stamp is touched, and names of suspects are written along the train track in micro text.

A Murder is Announced
Murder is Announced

Agatha Christie stamps by Royal Mail
The Mysterious Affair at Styles: Poirot and Hastings investigate the crime scene – forming the skull, as the murderer used poison. The whole stamp is then reproduced in miniature on the poison bottle.

Each stamp also has a hidden letter, which combine across the set to spell ‘Agatha’. The presentation pack for the stamps is like a bookshelf packed with original objects, photographs, book covers and a timeline of the the author’s life.

Agatha Christie Royal Mail

Mozilla rebrand

In the next stage of its unique ‘open’ redesign process, Mozilla and design studio johnson banks have released seven possible design routes for the group’s rebrand

Route 1: The Eye

Route A: The Eye. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banks

The verbal theme has been translated into a graphic route named The Eye. “Even though Mozilla’s old Dinosaur logo is only used internally, not externally, there’s still a lot of love in the community for all things ‘Dino’. What if we could find a way to use just part of a reptile in a dynamic new design?” say johnsonbanks.

Route A: The Eye. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute A: The Eye. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute A: The Eye. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banks

Route 2: The Connector

“Typographic experiments with the ‘Mozilla’ name led to this route – where the letters are intertwined around each other to create two interrelated marks, inspired by circuitry and tribal patterns,” johnson banks say.Route B: The Connector. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute B: The Connector. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute B: The Connector. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute B: The Connector. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banks

Route 3: Choose OpenRoute C: Choose Open. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute C: Choose Open. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banks“Mozilla stands for an Internet that’s open to all on an equal basis – but most people don’t realise that certain forces may divide it and close it off. How could we communicate ‘open’, quickly and simply? Could we find a current symbol or pictogram of ‘open’ and adapt it to our needs?” johnson banks say.Route C: Choose Open. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute C: Choose Open. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute 4: The ProtocolRoute D: The Protocol. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute D: The Protocol. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute D: The Protocol. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute D: The Protocol. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banks

Route 5: Wireframe World

Wireframe World looks at “a way to hint at the enormity of the internet, yet place Mozilla within that digital ecosystem”.Route E: Wireframe World. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute E: Wireframe World. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute E: Wireframe World. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banks

Route 6: The Impossible M

“We wanted to show the collaborative aspect of the maker spirit in a simple typographic mark. Inspired by both computer graphics and optical illusions, an ‘impossible’ design developed that also revealed a cohesive design approach across all applications.”Route F: The Impossible M. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute F: The Impossible M. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute F: The Impossible M. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute F: The Impossible M. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banks

Route 7: Flik Flak

This route was developed in parallel with The Eye “as we searched for animalistic solutions, but built characters out of consistent isometric shapes,”johnson banks say. “The more we experimented, the more we realised we could construct a character that also spelt out the words, Mozilla.”Route G: Flik Flak. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute G: Flik Flak. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute G: Flik Flak. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banksRoute G: Flik Flak. Mozilla identity proposal by johnson banks

 

Day_TM, energy bars

A tasty snack for gym-goers and healthy-minded consumers everywhere. Named and designed by the greek studio, mousegraphics, protein bars are packaged in paper pouches and embellished with pops of color and playful typography. 

“To name this daily snack we simply trademarked the time-span of its use: ‘Day-TM’ registers as a hip and easy to remember formula. Energy bars look like quasi-anarchist clusters of materials (dried fruit, nuts, cereals) or abstract mosaics and this served as our main graphic inspiration. We devised a hand-drawn typeface that replicates in synthesis those clusters and reveals their content in percentages (fruits, seeds, protein, honey). Typography animates packaging with shapes which are the same for letters and objects (i.e. fruits). The packaging surface holds them together exactly like honey binds the bar ingredients. Energy must sure play a role inside and out.”

Designs of the Year – Design Museum

Architecture

This year’s architecture nominees include a vintage theme park, the Tate Modern’s Switch House extension and Assemble’s Granby Workshop in Liverpool – winner of this year’s Turner Prize.

Herzog and De Meuron's Switch House extension for Tate ModernHerzog and De Meuron’s Switch House extension for Tate Modern

Graphics

Fourteen projects were shortlisted in the graphics category this year. These include Irma Boom’s Cuyperspussagi tile mural in Amsterdam’s Central Station – an impressive seascape made out of 77,000 tiles – and Studio Joost Grootens’ redesign of the Dikke Van Dale dictionary of the Dutch language, which uses colour coded text and illustrations.

A first aid kit for refugees which uses pictograms.A first aid kit for refugees which uses pictograms. Idea & Design: Erwin K. Bauer, Anne Hofmann, Dasha Zaichanka, Katharina Hölzl, Miriam S. Koller
Cooperations & Partners: Red Cross Vienna, Caritas, Medical Aid for Refugees, New Here, EOOS design / Places for People at Biennale di Venezia 2016, Urbanize Festival ICC Berlin

unspecified-15HelloRuby, a book by Linda Liukas and Jemina Lehmuskoski. The pair have also created a website and accompanying apps. helloruby.com

Product

Nineteen projects made the product shortlist – alongside furniture, ceramics and objects designed for urban living environments, nominees include the BBC micro:bit, a pocket-sized computer that children can use to create games or virtual pets:

The BBC micro:bit, a collaboration between the BBC, Tech Will Save Us (which designed the shape, look and feel of the device), ARM, element14, Barclays, Lancaster University, Microsoft, Nordic Semiconductor, Samsung, ScienceScope and The Wellcome Trust
The BBC micro:bit, a collaboration between the BBC, Tech Will Save Us (which designed the shape, look and feel of the device), ARM, element14, Barclays, Lancaster University, Microsoft, Nordic Semiconductor, Samsung, ScienceScope and The Wellcome TrustThe Drinkable Book. Senior designer: Brian Gartside. Graphic designer: Aaron Stephenson. Chemist: Dr. Theresa Dankovich, PhDThe Drinkable Book. Senior designer: Brian Gartside. Graphic designer: Aaron Stephenson. Chemist: Dr. Theresa Dankovich, PhD

You can see the full shortlists at designmuseum.org

Tate brand

To coincide with the opening of its new building, Tate invited design studios from around the world to pitch for a possible identity redesign. North, however, argued that the exisiting identity could still do the job – all it needed was a ‘deep clean’ and some clarity about its usage. North’s Sean Perkins and team explain why, sometimes, the best solution is to stick with what works

North_Tate_045_Logo_BW_V2_672x378

It’s not just Bankside that’s been evolving. Three years ago, Tate Britain got much more than a paint job with a £45m renovation. An ambitious refurbishment and extension project is set to transform Tate St Ives by mid-2017. Tate keeps upping its game.

Tate’s branding was a central part of its relaunch in 2000. Having come up with the core ‘look again, think again’ brand idea, Wolff Olins scored a big hit with the identity that sprang from it, with its striking introduction of not one but a whole range of logotypes that moved in and out of focus, ‘suggesting the dynamic nature of Tate – always changing but always recognisable’.

Like the rest of Tate, the brand has kept changing over the years – but not in such a good way. In fact, in the words of North’s Sean Perkins, whose studio has just completed a ‘deep clean’ of Tate’s brand, the whole thing was “a mess”. With a total of 75 different logotypes to choose from, a Tate font with several weights and no formal guidelines on grids, colours, positions, sizes and formats to aid decision-making, Tate’s in-house design team had been struggling with consistency for years. “They were paralysed because every time they designed anything, there were so many potential expressions,” says Perkins. “Having no rules, which was the original idea behind the brand, led to it looking tatty. If you look at the Barbican or the Whitney or the Stedelijk, there’s lots of beautiful expression and newness, but beneath it there’s a consistency that helps recognition and offers a guarantee of quality. With the Tate, the lack of consistency was getting in the way of that engagement with people.”

Some design decisions were causing confusion among visitors. Locking up the name of each of Tate’s four sites with the logo rendered the locations almost illegible. “People weren’t seeing them at all. You’d get off the train in Manchester and see a poster for Tate Britain and think it was Tate Liverpool. You never knew where to go.”

Tate recognised its brand was suffering, and potentially doing costly damage to its standing among visitors, sponsors and the global art community. The ‘look again, think again’ ethos was finally extended to the brand in 2014. Tate invited an international list of studios to tender for an identity review, calling for a solution that could show younger audiences, in particular, an exciting, dynamic way of experiencing art. The board was ready to contemplate a completely new look, but North persuaded them otherwise. “Our view was, they had something that worked; why throw that away?”

The project, led by North’s Jeremy Coysten and Stephen Gilmore, has been as much about establishing a stable set of design ground rules, or ‘building blocks’, for Tate’s in-house team as about developing new expressions and applications of the brand. “Having more parameters helps creativity,” says Perkins. “It unplugs designers from a lot of politics and helps them focus on creating something with impact.”

North selected just one version of the logotype and made it the sole wordmark, then re-created it with 340 dots in place of the previous 3,000. The reduction means that each dot can be individually animated and occasionally redrawn, as with the special edition produced to mark the Switch House opening, with square dots to echo the building’s architecture. Location names will stand free of the wordmark, in specified positions on the grid.

The most visible innovation is the animated ‘blur’ logo that will punctuate Tate film clips and ads, from mobile devices to dynamic displays at railway stations. Crops of the animation will cover merchandise of every kind, from shopping bags to umbrellas to Superga shoes. Wolff Olins’ original vision of an active identity has been realised. North’s Stephen Gilmore: “We’ve retained the dynamic, ‘ever-changing’ spirit without needing to have multiple logos and all the practical problems that entails. The logo artwork we’ve chosen feels energetic, porous and captures the blur in all applications. We animate that logo whenever it b adds to this spirit, but sparingly and not when it detracts from the content.”

Tate’s head of marketing, Rob Baker, agrees. “In many ways what North have created has allowed us to realise the potential of the identity, ensuring it can exist seamlessly on different platforms, using the Tate logo and typography in more expressive ways in our communications and on products in our shops and applying colour creatively.”

The decision to remain with Miles Newlyn’s rounded Tate font, but to strip the choice down to just a single headline weight was “massive”, says Perkins. “It allows designers to just think about the content and the messaging of a piece of communication, rather than just decorating it with different weights.” Georgia has been introduced for body text, and a palette of ten colours (based on work for Tate by artist Martin Creed) will be refreshed every two years.

Brand applications will follow guidelines developed by North since January, sharing projects with the Tate team. North will remain creative directors for Tate for the next 12 months, while the new system beds in.

Coming hard on the heels of the revival of the Co-op cloverleaf logo, Tate’s decision to also build on the brand assets in its locker, is likely to be seen as the start of a trend – a new age-of-austerity pragmatism on the part of clients, fuelled not just by budget considerations but also by headline-making social media maulings of other rebrands. North were responsible for both solutions. And Perkins believes that’s what both solutions are about: being responsible. “It would be arrogant and unprofessional for designers to say that [the Tate identity] was completely broken, to create something new for the sake of new without respecting the equity and the good things about the identity. We went in with honesty and said, ‘you’ve got something really powerful, let us make it work for you’,” he says. “We’ve always believed in creating a solution for an identity first and then deciding what the visual elements are to achieve it. The application of an identity is so important. It’s about beautifully designed systems and applications that bring it alive. If you can do that with an existing identity – tidy it up, unclutter it, show them how to make fresh and beautiful communications – it’s a great solution.”

For many brands about to scrap an identity with time left to run, Tate has shown the value of looking again and thinking again.

Michael Evamy is the author of LOGO and Logotype. See evamy.co.uk, @michaelevamy