Tag Archives: brand

Beer brand Caravelle

Design studio Hey has worked with restaurant and brewery Caravelle on creating colourful packaging for its new range of craft beers. The Barcelona-based studio previously teamed up with Caravelle back in 2017 on its initial beer range, and was enlisted once again to help it flesh out the existing design system as the brewery relocates to a larger location to keep up with demand.

Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle
Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle
Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle

The packaging takes a geometric turn across the rest of the range, with a pixelated bit graphic applied to Galactic IPA and a colourful striped design showcasing the Electric Relaxation XPA.

moonlit

Working with the Creative Director and in-house creative team at Moonpig, Ian Styles team have completely overhauled the brand. Most of the work was done with our team embedded directly within the creative department, which was crucial to understanding the culture, customers, and vision for the business. 

Building on their new positioning our idea was a simple one; create a whole new world for Moonpig, one where we imagine that we live life on the moon, where the normal rules don’t apply.

We seek to capture people in our new world’s gravity, pulling them towards us for a moment, offering an escape, where boring is banished, the obvious avoided and where life, is more fun and lighthearted.

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Huxtaburgers’ brand

Editorial photograph

Who knew a take out bag could be a statement piece?

HUXTABURGER wanted to create a clarified brand position that clearly identified their community and allowed for improved social uptake & engagement. By Refining and articulating the brand story and messaging framework, the aim was to capture and communicate the brand’s personality, which had previously been disconnected in visuals and voice.

The design inspiration came from graphic landscapes that took inspiration from destinations in which Huxtaburger operates and the visual look of the ingredients they use. The characters that you’ll discover throughout the visual identity embody Huxtaburger’s brand positioning by portraying people doing extreme things. The typography/logotype design was a refresh of the existing logo, uniting past and present with added confidence and strength.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Dogs now run on Dunkin

Editorial photograph

In support of Dunkin’ Joy in Childhood Foundation whose mission is to “provide the simple joys of childhood to kids battling hunger or illness,” both brands are offering dog toys modeled after the doughnut-and-coffee chain’s hot cup and Munchkin box, which includes three squeaky, fetchable versions of their ubiquitous doughnut holes. Money raised will go to support programs such as “Dogs for Joy,” which supports in-residence dogs in hospitals. These puppers help calm child patients and put the kids at ease during procedures and treatments.

Editorial photograph

LEC lockdown identity

DesignStudio has created the branding for the League of Legends European Championship, which aims to build a sense of community in light of lockdown measures.

While the global pandemic has caused major disruption to the vast majority of sporting events, the world of esports has fared comparatively well. In fact, traditional sports have entered the esports landscape more than ever before, with tournaments like the virtual Grand Prix pitting traditional athletes and gamers against one another for the first time.

Yet the impact on events has still filtered down to the gaming world, with significant tournaments such as the League of Legends European Championship (LEC) having to forgo live crowds and in-person experiences at the finals this summer, and instead rely solely on streaming to audiences online.

With the crowd element removed, DesignStudio is aiming to engage viewers of the LEC Summer Finals 2020 by creating a dynamic identity for the event. The identity and motion graphics tap into the language of social media and online communities with hashtags and arcade-inspired emojis, while the tickertape effect evokes the atmosphere of major arena events. As part of the project, DesignStudio also developed a quiz, as well as a futuristic teaser film that acknowledges no arena could be ‘found’ for the tournament, before culminating in a range of motivational messages about the event.

The team looked to 8-bit graphics and classic arcade games for inspiration, yet the overall look and feel is decidedly contemporary – so much so that certain design elements would look quite at home in club culture.

LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity
LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity

The LEC Summer Finals 2020 branding aims to further this sense of pride and uniqueness in the esports community, in a bid to continue “breaking those entertainment barriers”. That design cues seen in electronic music can exist comfortably in the esports space indicates how preconceptions about the gaming community are being eradicated. “It doesn’t have to be geeky and nerdy and weird. The same people that play those games also attend electronic music festivals,” Ng says. “Why does there need to be a differentiation?”

LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity

Witty Snickers ad

Snickers is the latest brand to release an ad that would have made zero sense to us a year ago, but is likely to raise a much needed grin in our weird new existence.

The spot highlights some of the habits we might have got into in our Zoom-heavy set up, and why it pays to be cautious as we emerge blinking into a more social world again.

Credits:
Agency: BBDO New York
CCO: David Lubars
ECDs: Gianfranco Arena, Peter Kain
Creative directors: Scott Mahoney, Dan Oliva
Production company: O Positive
Director: Jess Coulter

Branding an Olympic athlete

While gymnastics is Tulloch’s main focus, he is also keen to build a platform beyond competitive sport – whether through mentoring young athletes and working with youth groups or launching his own range of clothing and merchandise. For someone who grew up looking up to athletes like Cristiano Ronaldo, Roger Federer and Michael Jordan, success isn’t just about winning medals or standing on the podium – it’s also about using your platform to inspire and motivate others and having a wider cultural impact.

“It’s always been my dream and my goal to have a brand,” he tells CR. “I look at people like Ronaldo and Jordan and their brand and what they have … and they’re more than an athlete or a sportsperson,” he tells CR. “I love inspiring people, I’m into fashion, I’ve got a lot more that I want to do outside of gymnastics as well, so that’s something I’ve always wanted.”

Thanks to a collaboration with branding agency JKR, Tulloch now has his own visual identity, and a soon-to-be-released clothing range featuring upbeat phrases inspired by his attitude to sport. The identity launched earlier this year, and Tulloch hopes it will help him build his profile and reach a wider audience outside of gymnastics.

BECO Steal our staff

Having staff poached is typically a brand’s worst nightmare, yet toiletries brand Beco welcomed it with open arms in its provocative #StealOurStaff campaign.

The campaign was created by TBWA\London, which had already been working with Beco on getting its products stocked in leading retailers such as Boots, Waitrose and Sainsbury’s. The brand includes organic, paraben-free and plastic-free toiletries in its range, but it is the people that make Beco what it is. With 80% of its workforce disabled, disadvantaged or visually impaired, the social enterprise is gunning for change when it comes to the disability employment gap sustained by the biased hiring practices of many businesses. It’s a widespread issue that seems missing from wider discourse, which is what #StealOurStaff set out to change.

At the heart of the project’s concept was its packaging design, which features CVs of Beco employees. “It’s like an upside-down recruitment campaign,” TBWA\London chief creative officer Andy Jex says. The packaging takeover was joined by tweets sent to business leaders, a website-turned-recruitment portal that also contained advice for employers interested in hiring people with disabilities, and an accompanying spot on Channel 4. Made in collaboration with production company Hoi Polloi, the film stars real Beco employees contradicting the less-than-adequate audio description (AD) voiceover.

The film concept emerged from encounters with Beco staff working at the factory – particularly one team member who ridiculed Netflix’s questionable AD. It soon evolved into a tongue-in-cheek testament to the fact that people with disabilities are not short on humour. The aim was to be more lighthearted and less worthy, with the approach highlighting just how misleading media representations of disabled people can be – “particularly in advertising”, Jex notes.

Haarala Hamilton photography

Haarala Hamilton logo design by LanternAward-winning photographers Liz and Max Haarala Hamilton are well known for their portrait, food, travel and editorial creative. They have featured in various publications globally, including Huck Magazine, Boat Magazine, The Observer Magazine and Observer Food Monthly.

The simple branding system showcases Liz and Max’s greatest works across applications including business cards and portfolio brochures. Alongside photography, a suite of creative headlines play on the ‘Haa Ha’ wordmark, bringing life to conventionally mundane collateral including invoices and packing tape.

Haarala Hamilton brand marketing materialsHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton web design by Lantern

Created by Lantern