Tag Archives: brand

SOAC

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Brand identity for SOAC, calming eye drops for irritated eyes. Rasmus und Christin created a colorful brand identity including a functional packaging and sonorous naming. The logotype’s strong contrast of the letters point out the product’s main feature – immediate relief of visual disturbance.

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Climate change has no borders

Ahead of the UN’s pivotal climate change conference in Glasgow this year, Johnson Banks has designed a fluid, colourful identity that makes climate change everyone’s problem.

New COP26 identity by Johnson Banks

The identity is centred around the earth – a simple icon, but not without its differences. Deep blues and greens are traded for a purple, white and lime palette, while borders are all but effaced by a beautiful marbling effect evocative of swirled paint. The image of the earth is also used as part of an eye which, for some, may bring to mind Monsters, Inc, but does neatly bolster the claim that “the world is watching”.

COP26 identity by Johnson BanksAn image of the COP26 identity by Johnson Banks

“The swirling coloured globe illustrates that the climate has no borders, alludes to currents and weather systems – and is intentionally beautiful,” reads a statement on the project. “It deliberately avoids directly using recognisable country shapes and is designed to fascinate people, wake them up and compel them to take urgent action to save our precious planet.”

The adapted colour scheme was chosen to complement the more “metaphorical” approach. “Just using traditional blues and green seemed a bit obvious, so by using brighter, more RGB colours we can show that this is a new take on traditional ‘world’ imagery,” explains founder and creative director Michael Johnson.The main design for the COP26 identity by Johnson BanksCOP26 identity by Johnson Banks

“We looked at a range of design approaches, from ‘neutral’ to ‘agit’ and it quickly became clear that for the Cabinet Office (our client) something that was hectoring or ‘angry’ might prove counter-productive,” Johnson told us. “As we developed three routes, the swirling globe became a clear favourite because we could use quite strident language with it, whilst we could all imagine it slowly turning throughout a three-day conference without driving anyone crazy!

Dash’s the coffee brand

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Dassyras is a family-owned coffee roaster founded in 1987 to produce artisan Greek and filter coffee. As the second generation entered the business, they began crafting a unique espresso blend of several different specialty coffee beans. Its distinctively rich taste and impressive aroma paved the way for the product to gradually become a bestseller in the wholesale market. But it was literally a no name brand. Yet every great product deserves a great name, logo and packaging! The name needed to be short, good-sounding, easy to remember and somehow connected to the family business name. So the name “dash” fulfilled all three criteria and sounded a lot like “Dassyras”. Most importantly though, the word brings to mind moments of pause and relaxation.

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Dash was placed in between two dashes to indicate a pause/break. Just like em dashes, which are used to indicate a break in sentence. Meanwhile a coffee drop stands still, creating the impression that it will fall any minute. To convey the brand’s authentic and micro-roasting personality, we designed and printed their business cards on brown kraft paper. Following the same handmade logic, we made by hand, one by one, Dash’s wood labels with the logo wood-burned into them.

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Moa Hunter honey packaging

Makuna honey, a variety of honey found in New Zealand and highly sought the world over, has been harvested by the Maori since ancient times. That history is reflected in the branding and packaging by agency Kallan & Co for Moa Hunter Prue Makuna HoneyEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

Each box is hand made, with Manuka oil brushed into the base, allowing for the aroma of the Manuka bushes to enhance the experience of opening the package. Each jar of honey is assembled by the family, with a hand-woven string and is then finished with a wax seal of the Moa Hunter logomark.

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National Trust 125th anniversary ad

Credits:
Agency: Wieden+Kennedy London
Creative Director: Flo Heiss
Creatives: Derek Lui, Harry Ingrams
Executive Creative Directors: Tony Davidson, Iain Tait
Production Company: All Mighty Pictures
Director/DOP: Anthony Dickenson
Executive Producer/Creative Director: Mark Harbour
Design Director: Karen Jane
Lead Designer: Alex Thursby- Pelham
Designer: Xueling Wang

OKCupid

The dating app’s ads highlight the issues that matter most to its users – and tell us it’s OK to choose partners based on their political views.

OKCupid’s Ask Yourself campaign tackles the subject head on, with a series of ads that tell us it’s OK to select partners based on their political leanings, their attitudes towards gender or even their views on abortion. Outdoor posters feature lines such as ‘It’s OK not to date a man who won’t vote for a woman’ and ‘It’s OK to choose to only date someone who’s pro-choice’.

Featuring artwork by Xaviera López, it was created by Mekanism and follows Wieden+Kennedy’s witty DTF ads, which offered some surprising new takes on an acronym that has become ubiquitous on dating apps.

Kings Place Brand

Based in London’s Kings Cross, the space bills itself as the ‘cultural pulse’ of the area, hosting comedy, festivals, music performances and talks. To create its new identity, Studio Sutherl& delved into the “energy and variety” of its events. Working together with software engineer and digital artist Joe Pochciol, the studio built SoundWaveMachine – software that can analyse audio files and then generate new logos based on them.

Part of the aim of this approach was to bring together Kings Place’s sub brands, and the sound waves give each of these a common visual identity that still allows for some individuality.

Now, the branding for each event follows the same typeface – Champion Middleweight – but adopts its own unique pattern, based on music or sound from the performance.

Temple’s identity

Leeds’ new district visual identity has been designed by local studio Thompson Brand Partners and is named after its landmark Temple Works building, which features a distinctly Egyptian façade.

The long-abandoned, Grade I-listed building is the centrepiece of a regeneration project being led by developer CEG. The newly created district of Temple is set to be home to a host of offices, homes and leisure spaces.

Local studio Thompson Brand Partners was chosen to create the visual identity for the district, which needed to show that it “knows where it comes from”, according to ECD Ian Thompson.

The type-focused logo looks to reflect the façade of Temple Works, while ancient Egypt is also the inspiration for the colour palette, which includes yellow ochre and Egyptian blue.