Tag Archives: brand

Fast food made beautiful

TBWA\Paris has pulled off the impressive feat of making processed food look beautiful in its campaign for McDonald’s all-day breakfast menu in France.

The agency worked with 3D animator Matthieu Braccini on a series of gifs that show different elements of making the fast food chain’s famed Egg McMuffin.

 

Credits:
Agency: TBWA\PARIS
ECDs: Benjamin Marchal, Faustin Claverie
Creative Director: Maud Poilpré
Creative Lead: Nicolas Barrès
3D Illustrator: Matthieu Braccini
Sound: Adrobski

Bella Vida

After years of struggling with cystic acne, founder and CEO Erin Schmidt of luxury skincare line Bella Vida Santa Barbara decided to craft a line of products like cleansers and serums that could naturally help acne sufferers. Bella Vida means “Beautiful Life,” and on the company’s website, they tout that their passion is to help everyone feel beautiful and love themselves, a lofty goal that the cosmetic industry often ironically misses.

Editorial photograph

The font-focused logo for Bella Vida Santa Barbara went through three rounds of designs in-house by Schmidt, who was inspired by luxury designers Chanel, Gucci, Yves St. Laurent and Christian Dior. Schmidt tried several fonts she had on hand and went to a group of fellow entrepreneurs for feedback.Editorial photographEditorial photograph

New Skincare Line

To launch a skincare line in today’s oversaturated beauty market, you need to be confident that your target demographic will be on board. With the launch of Plenaire, a new UK-based brand, they’ve gone to the source, working closely with a Gen-Z focus-group that likely helped shaped HBO’s Euphoria as well?Editorial photographThe packaging for the line they developed with the help of design firm Pentagram skews minimal, with the tubes light, pastel-pink and signature lilac (named ‘Cresyl’ after the purple histological stain cresyl violet) with small particles to add a layer of texture. Minimalist, yet striking enough to work into your “shelfies,” the design of Plenaire comes elevated without being overly flashy. Their online presence is also minimalist and inclusive, as any brand speaking to Gen Z should be. Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Athru new identity by JKR’s

After a difficult few decades, it seems Irish whiskey is having a moment. The number of distilleries in the country has grown from four to 24 in the past six years and sales are booming: Over 10.5 million cases were sold in 2018 (the highest figure since the pre-Prohibition era) and over 900,000 people visited distilleries for tours and tasting sessions.

One of the latest arrivals on the scene is Athru: a premium brand founded by Irish entrepreneur David Raethorne, who has spent the past five years turning a former video tape factory in Sligo into the Lough Gill Distillery.

JKR worked closely with Raethorne and his team to create the Athru brand. As the project is a long-term endeavour, JKR took inspiration from the idea of “an unfinished picture”, cutting the corners off letters and splicing together images of the local landscape.
It’s a striking approach – and one that stands out among a sea of brands using scripted typefaces and vintage logos. Sean Thomas, Creative Director at JKR, says the agency wanted to create something unique and looked to art galleries, museums and disruptor brands such as Aesop instead of Athru’s rivals for inspiration.

Edition at play

Universal Everything was commissioned by London-based publisher Visual Editions and Google’s Creative Lab in Sydney to create branding and identity guidelines for Editions At Play, an experimental digital publishing platform for “books that cannot be printed” and immersive literature.

The typography and identity is inspired by books on a shelf and binary code. Bringing the two elements of literature and technology together, the brand mark is free to develop and grow with different authors’ approaches to the Editions At Play publications.

Forwards is boring

Opting to keep things simple but effective, Desigual hasn’t meddled with its typeface (which was already a simple sans-serif, resembling many of the more recent logo redesigns to surface lately). Instead, the Spanish clothing brand has opted to flip the whole logo altogether. While the ‘S’ in Desigual had already reversed, it has permanently flipped the remaining letters to match, so it now reads entirely in reverse.

The refresh is designed to mirror Desigual’s positioning as a brand that doesn’t follow the norm, from its outlandish clothing lines right down to its name, which literally means ‘different’ in Spanish. The logo redesign was launched as part of the label’s new Forwards Is Boring campaign, headed by Desigual’s in-house creative studio and Amsterdam-based agency We Are Pi. With the campaign also comes a newly redesigned website and a capsule clothing collection showcasing the new logo.

“The objective of the campaign, in addition to presenting the company’s surprising new image which makes it the first international brand to permanently rotate its logo, is to invite people to think. To make them feel awkward. To make them step outside of their comfort zones. Which is exactly what we’ve done,” said Guillem Gallego, Desigual’s CMO.

Though it might not seem like the most original approach, Desigual claims to be the first brand to permanently flip its logo – surprising given how obvious it seems at first glance. Some have responded with weak retorts on how the brand name is pronounced or indeed written in reverse, however it seems likely that these kinds of campaigns will engage consumers, rather than just confuse them. Plus, as such a recognisable name to so many, Desigual can evidently get away with it.

Oat-ly milk?

While oat milk’s popularity is just gaining momentum in the US, it got its start in Sweden back in the early 1990s. Rickard Öste, a food scientist at Lund University, researched options for a milk replacement that could provide a more sustainable solution and also be suitable for those with lactose intolerance. Essentially, he discovered a way to make the fibers of oats into a liquid, and shortly afterward he founded Oatly.

So why didn’t oat milk get added to cafe menus back in the 90s when it first became available? 

“Design-wise, it was sort of in the lactose intolerance category, so it wasn’t really considered food for everyone,” explained Lars Elfman, Design Director at Oatly. So when Toni Petersson was appointed CEO of Oatly in 2012—nearly two decades after the invention of oat milk—the first thing he did was hire one of the Creative Directors to turn the brand around.5268.jpgoatly-ice-cream-today-main-190620_3d1fb261dbf0c58d525e883825538d3f.jpgOatly-range-with-chilled-milk.jpg

The team certainly had their work cut out for them, after all, when they started they were an ad agency, not a design company. “I hadn’t made food packaging before,” confessed Lars. Still, they looked at the challenge as an opportunity to do something different—so different, in fact, that when they first approached Tetra Pak about printing the design they’d created, the packaging company initially said no. “They looked at it and were like, ‘You’re not going to be happy.’ They were worried about smearing and about some of the large dots becoming too big. So we bought a big roll of paper to have them do a test print first.”

The result? It came out perfectly. Lars said they’d done something no one else had done before, and that Tetra Pak had worked wonders with their packaging—although it was a good learning process for Oatly overall.

In going against the expectations of what food packaging should be (as well as what other brands gravitate towards), Lars and the team instead positioned Oatly as a handmade product. The brand’s packaging has a screen printed appearance with a more “scruffy background,” as he described it, making it feel like a custom crafted beverage and just another milk alternative.Slide-2-hello-future.8_2048x.png


Getting lost in the V&A

As one of the most famous museum’s in the world, the V&A attracts around four million visitors every year. Of those four million, some are first time visitors and some have become regulars, and some are happy just to explore the museum’s permanent collection, while others have come with a specific object or exhibition in mind.

Navigating the South Kensington museum’s three interconnected buildings, seven floors, 60,000 objects, five temporary exhibition spaces, four shops and three cafés is no mean feat even for the hardiest of gallery goers, meaning that its wayfinding system is an integral part of the overall visitor experience.

“Our brief was to facilitate an outstanding visitor experience, enabling people, whatever their interests, to explore the museum with confidence and curiosity. It was not just about getting people from A to B, but encouraging visitors to go beyond the ground floor, and discover lesser-known parts of the building and the rest of the museum’s collection,” says dn&co Creative Director Patrick Eley.

“Getting lost in museums is part of the fun – so much so, the shop even sells a keyring stamped triumphantly with the tag ‘Lost in the V&A’. But when you can’t find your way out, or more importantly to the toilet, it becomes frustrating and disorientating,” Eley adds.Black and white remain the core colour palette, while any extra colours have been stripped out except to highlight the museum’s paid exhibitions. “Acting as a beacon, these colours draw visitors through the busy ground floor getting them to their destinations faster, protecting one of the museum’s core revenue streams that help keep the permanent galleries free to enter,” says Eley.

One of the other key changes is a new map, which has been redrawn to work across digital platforms and environments as well as in print. Walls are now drawn as solid barriers, galleries are named as well as numbered, awkward cross-referencing has been removed and type sizes have been increased, all while making the map larger, more relevant and more compact to carry around.“Since the building is so vast, we took a city wayfinding approach,” says Eley. “People always need more help when a destination is out of sight, so similar to finger posts in an urban environment we introduced signs at the thresholds between spaces to reassure visitors they were still on the right route. They’re a bit like the breadcrumb trail in Hansel and Gretel, or the Theseus’ string in the Minotaur’s maze.”