Tag Archives: brand

Jamie Oliver’s pasta brand

Otherway was enlisted to create the design identity for Pasta Dreams – a partnership between TV chef Jamie Oliver and Taster, a company comprised of food sub-brands which are all focused entirely on home delivery.

According to Otherway, the aim was to step away from what people might traditionally associate with Italian food, with an emphasis on retro design details.

The playful identity comes to life in a set of animations. Blobs of olive oil float through the air, and in the Pasta Dreams logotype, they rise up to form the counters in the letters A and R.

The psychedelic imagery carries through to the packaging, which highlights the “shapes, swirls, and splashes” people come across when cooking pasta and features a warm palette of peach, orange and brown.

The Pasta Dreams design concept seeks to appeal to younger customers rather than Oliver’s “traditional audience demographic”, yet there was an important balance to strike between unexpected and on-brand.

Ikea Norway promises to buy back unwanted furniture 

Following the Trash Collection 2021, a campaign and initiative that spotlighted Ikea furniture which had been salvaged from the rubbish and re-sold at its second-hand stores, the Swedish retailer has announced the launch of the Life Collection 2022.

In a similar spirit to last year’s initiative, this one attempts to save and repurpose old furniture that is no longer needed. However, this time around, the furniture is not coming from the trash, but directly from people’s homes, with Ikea buying items back from owners.

As suggested by the title of the campaign, Ikea understands that buyers often don’t want to keep every piece of furniture forever and, given that life is a rollercoaster, these items can become unwanted due to a variety of reasons. In the short campaign film, directed by Kavar Singh and Niels Windfeldt, these reasons include death, sobriety, separation, childbirth, or simply because a significant other finds it “too tacky”.

The Life Collection 2022 marks another step towards sustainability for the brand, as it continues to address the widespread issue of waste. As one of the world’s biggest buyers of wood, it has faced criticism in the past for unsustainable logging practices, and as such, has worked hard in recent years to improve its credentials.

Credits: 
Agency: Try
Creatives: Caroline Riis, Eirik Sørensen
Designers: Jeppe Gjesti, Mats Mæland, Magnus Snickars, Dennis Magnus-Andresen, Tommy Lybekk, Marthe Solli, Elise Eik Ismar
Directors: Kavar Singh, Niels Windfeldt
DOP: Oskar Dalsbakken

Opening Up the Outdoors (OUTO)

There has been a huge cultural shift in the way we view the great outdoors in recent years, particularly in the wake of the pandemic and our increased desire to spend time in nature for both our physical and mental health.

Couple that with technical outdoor retailers’ newfound appeal to style-conscious consumers (see the North Face x Gucci collab that broke the internet), and it’s unsurprising that business is booming.

“Spending quality time in the great outdoors is a right everyone should be able to enjoy, but ever since I began hiking, mountain biking and skiing I’ve often been one of the only Black or brown faces on the trail (or piste),” says journalist and filmmaker Keme Nzerem.

Recognising the power of brands to enact change, new non-profit Opening Up the Outdoors (OUTO) has been spun out off It’s Great Out There with a commitment to equity and inclusion. Founding members include leading outdoor brands the North Face, Arc’teryx, Adidas Terrex, Patagonia, and Vivobarefoot.

The organisation’s launch is accompanied by an eye-catching visual identity led by Amsterdam agency We Are Pi. The hand generated logo and illustrations evoke a DIY aesthetic, and are balanced with a utilitarian type system which nods to the design language of manuals and maps.

“The design approach goes against the established aesthetic of the outdoors, and feels like a true celebration of the new outdoor culture Black and brown communities are creating,” says the design team.

Credits:
Agency: We Are Pi
Design Director: Seth Josephs
Senior designer: Gemma Stoner
Motion Designer/Illustration: Nick Fatouris
Creative Director: Taylor Black
Creative Director: Daan van Dam
Copywriter: Maya Halilovic

Branston Pickle brand

After Branston Pickle’s new logo and packaging design, both by This Way Up, were revealed earlier this summer, the condiments brand is launching a refreshed identity led by Wonderhood Studios.

The new visual and verbal identity leans into its lengthy heritage, having spent the last 100 years as a staple of many British kitchens.

According to Simon Elvins, head of art at Wonderhood Studios, it was an opportunity to “dust-off this quintessentially British brand”. The execution of the new identity is simple yet effective in reflecting the nature of the product and brand, featuring appropriately chunky type and a palette that draws heavily on the yellows and greens associated with Branston.

The copy does the heavy lifting in the brand campaign, Bring out the Branston, which mostly goes for a hit of nostalgia and warmth through references to childhood memories and family time, while injecting a bit of playfulness into the mix.

Kick it out

The charity celebrates its 30th anniversary next year, with the organisation expanding its focus over the last three decades from racism in football through to all forms of discrimination in sport. It’s currently partnering with Sky Sports, and as part of the collaboration has developed new programmes for schools, editorial initiatives and MBA in football scholarships to tackle underrepresentation.

Sky Creative has replaced the previous sans serif wordmark with an energetic new football-shaped logo, which renders the name of the charity in what looks like duct tape.

According to the in-house studio, the aim was to express Kick It Out’s grassroots beginnings and also bring in a bit more attitude, and the new look undoubtedly has a lot more personality and vigour than Kick It Out’s previous branding.

It also seems much more adaptable, able to change colour to appear alongside the logos of football clubs, many of which are more intricate crest-style symbols. In these instances, the Kick It Out branding holds its own without undermining the club.

Its tape-style type also feels right at home in some of Kick It Out’s creative executions – for example, ‘If you see it or hear it report it’ pasted on the walls of the men’s toilet, or even at a larger size in the centre of the pitch.

Burger King’s minmal ad campaign

The creative centres on the fast food brand’s trademark flame grill lines, which are emphasised in a series of minimal graphic images that continue the vintage flavour of Burger King’s 2021 rebrand.

A series of accompanying taglines – woven into the stripy grill marks of the burgers – mock fast food competitors, with outdoor ads strategically placed near Mcdonald’s, KFC and Subway restaurants. The campaign’s echoed in limited edition Whopper wrappers, also emblazoned with grill lines, and BK employees at London’s Leicester Square restaurant will be decked out in stripy shirts.

While it might seem that Burger King is following where McDonald’s has led, it’s all part of a wider trend of simplified branding, with businesses in all areas adopting more stripped back approaches, in part to make imagery and logos work better in digital. It’s yet to be seen if the pendulum will, at some point, swing back towards maximalism.

Credits:
Ad Agency: BBH
CCO: Alex Grieve
ECD: Helen Rhodes
Deputy ECD: Felipe Serradourada Guimaraes
Copywriter: Marcy Rayson
Art Director: Callum Prior
Designer: Christian Kolodziejski

McDonald’s continues its minimalist mission in new print ads

Created by Leo Burnett London, the latest UK campaign for McDonald’s features the fast food brand’s distinctive products – including the Big Mac, a gherkin, a strawberry milkshake, and fries – in a stripped-back illustrative style.

It is a look that we’ve come to expect from the brand, and which follows campaigns including its previous work for McDelivery and also its packaging redesign, introduced last year.

In this new campaign, the posters feature subtle location pins to emphasise the home delivery service, accompanied with copy simply stating ‘we deliver’.

The continued use of bold, elegant illustration certainly stands out in a sea of fast food brands showing close-up images of burgers etc, and unsurprisingly is appealing to the creative teams working on the brand, according to ECD Mark Elwood.

Plum Guide’s new ad campaign

Plum Guide is a travel brand which proclaims to curate stays in the “world’s most remarkable homes”. Its new campaign, by Stink Studios, doesn’t waste time trying to seduce audiences with visuals of these destinations though, and instead points out just how many holidays you are likely to have left, depending on your age.

The campaign is rounded off by the tagline ‘No time for average stays’. It’s a different approach for the holiday industry, which can often feel awash with identical campaigns showing palm trees and immaculate beaches. Though it might also make you feel like time is running out, a point brought home by Ali Lowry, chief brand officer at Plum Guide.