Tag Archives: creative review

Sephora power of beauty

French beauty chain Sephora has launched a new campaign called The Unlimited Power of Beauty, which signifies a shift in its brand positioning. “The Unlimited Power of Beauty is a new, powerful campaign that is deliberately different from previous years,” explains Olivier Vigneaux, the CEO for BETC Digital. “It is both universal in its casting and intimate in its tone and imagery, allowing viewers to see themselves in the story and discover the potential of their own beauty.”

The three-minute ad, directed by German creative Jonas Lindstroem, tells the story of a woman’s relationship with her reflection throughout her life. Tender and intimate, we follow the lead character from childhood to adulthood and are taken through relatable moments of both doubt and strength.

From experimenting with vivid makeup as a young girl to using it as an adult as a confidence boost after a hard day, the ad aims to highlight how the same person can explore the many facets of beauty in a lifetime, and even in just one day.

The campaign signifies a more grounded approach to the way we use makeup and beauty products, taking us away from the more theatrical. It acknowledges the ways in which beauty has evolved, going beyond catwalks and magazines, and how it can now be presented to us through friends’ selfies or uploads from influencers.

 

DK new identity

The brand overhaul was done by Angus Hyland and his team at the Pentagram London office, and according to the design studio is an attempt to reconnect with existing readers, as well as find those all-important new ones.

Hyland has kept the the open book shape that people will be familiar with, but reduced some of the detail – allowing it to work more effectively at different sizes and in different environments. The serif typeface is now gone, replaced by a bespoke serif.

While many of us might have had a soft spot for the old logo, this is undoubtedly an improvement. There was always a hint of clip art about the previous motif, and it very much felt like the symbol of an educational company rather than a publisher.

Pentagram’s work brings it up to date, but also transforms it into a surprisingly elegant mark. It’s easy to imagine it embossed on books of all kinds.

The agency have also introduced a new tagline – For the curious – which reflects the diversity of content DK publishes.

Women’s ad

Its latest campaign also addresses the topic, using a print ad in the new issue of Vanity Fair to illustrate the recurring pattern of coercive control behaviours often carried out by abusers. Created by Engine, the striking ad takes the form of a colourful, patterned graphic, which on closer inspection reveals hidden messages of abuse.

“In this difficult time awareness of the work Women’s Aid does is even more crucial, especially as some people will now be forced into isolation with their abusers,” says Engine creative director, Chris Ringsell. “This creative execution highlights the menacing form of abuse that is coercive control, a pattern of repeated, controlling and abusive behaviour.”

A book a day

Oliver Jeffers announced he would be reading one of his books every day until people are able to leave their homes. Readings take place at 6pm UK time and are broadcast via Instagram Stories, meaning viewers in different time zones can tune in and watch any time within the following 24 hours. All broadcasts have been recorded and will also be added to Jeffers’ website.Image result for oliver jeffers

Mac Barnett – the author behind the Jack Book and KidSpy series – is also broadcasting live readings via Instagram at 12pm Pacific time, which are available to watch for 24 hours. In a post announcing the readings, Barnett said he had around a month’s worth of picture books – “and if we run out I might read some chapter books”, he wrote.Image result for Mac Barnett books

Climate change has no borders

Ahead of the UN’s pivotal climate change conference in Glasgow this year, Johnson Banks has designed a fluid, colourful identity that makes climate change everyone’s problem.

New COP26 identity by Johnson Banks

The identity is centred around the earth – a simple icon, but not without its differences. Deep blues and greens are traded for a purple, white and lime palette, while borders are all but effaced by a beautiful marbling effect evocative of swirled paint. The image of the earth is also used as part of an eye which, for some, may bring to mind Monsters, Inc, but does neatly bolster the claim that “the world is watching”.

COP26 identity by Johnson BanksAn image of the COP26 identity by Johnson Banks

“The swirling coloured globe illustrates that the climate has no borders, alludes to currents and weather systems – and is intentionally beautiful,” reads a statement on the project. “It deliberately avoids directly using recognisable country shapes and is designed to fascinate people, wake them up and compel them to take urgent action to save our precious planet.”

The adapted colour scheme was chosen to complement the more “metaphorical” approach. “Just using traditional blues and green seemed a bit obvious, so by using brighter, more RGB colours we can show that this is a new take on traditional ‘world’ imagery,” explains founder and creative director Michael Johnson.The main design for the COP26 identity by Johnson BanksCOP26 identity by Johnson Banks

“We looked at a range of design approaches, from ‘neutral’ to ‘agit’ and it quickly became clear that for the Cabinet Office (our client) something that was hectoring or ‘angry’ might prove counter-productive,” Johnson told us. “As we developed three routes, the swirling globe became a clear favourite because we could use quite strident language with it, whilst we could all imagine it slowly turning throughout a three-day conference without driving anyone crazy!

Dan Reisinger

Dan Reisinger was born in Kanjiža, Yugoslavia, now Serbia in 1934. Much of his childhood was spent in hiding from the occupying Germans and having lost many family members in the Holocaust, including his father who died in a forced labour battalion of the Hungarian Army, in 1949 he and his mother immigrated to the nascent state of Israel.

Descended from four generations of painters and master-craftsmen, Reisinger soon found work as a housepainter. His sights, however, were set on acquiring a profession in the field of art and design. In 1950, former Bauhaus student Mordechai Ardon, Head of the New Bezalel School of Arts and Crafts, Jerusalem, accepted the eager 16 year-old into the school. Dan’s first poster for the national lottery was published in 1953, and a year later he won the Struck prize for the Bezalel’s most outstanding student.

Peace poster, 1968

Maccabiah Games poster, 1977

For 60 years, Reisinger’s memorable posters for the Habimah National Theatre, the Maccabiah Games, EL AL, the Israel Defence Force, and much more dominated Israel’s hoardings.

Poster for EL AL airlines, c. 1970

Poster for a performance of Julius Caesar, 1961

Always conscious of Bauhaus principles, Dan kept his work bold, straightforward and colourful. His three-dimensional and environmental designs were no exception. Israel’s Pavilion at Montreal’s Expo ’67, Tel Aviv’s seaside promenade, Bar Ilan university, medical schools, hospitals, buildings and industrial plants were given the brightly painted Reisinger treatment. His interactive calendars are masterpieces of paper engineering.

Poster for Israel Museum, 1976

Poster for the Post Office, 1965

Perpetual calendars for MoMA, 1987

Minimalism McDonald’s

It can be risky to go minimalist in an ad campaign: what if your audience miss the point entirely and don’t realise who the ad is for? Yet McDonald’s has created a series of outdoor ads in recent years that have boldly expressed just how deeply the fast food brand is embedded in our collective consciousness.

Joining these are a new series of posters from Leo Burnett for McDonald’s UK, which abandon photographs of juicy burgers or crisp fries and instead simply opt for words. Surely an ad creative’s delight to work on, the posters prove that we need no more than text to get us feeling peckish. The campaign was created in collaboration with renowned typographer David Schwen, and clearly hark back to Schwen’s earlier series titled Type Sandwiches.

Penagram’s new identity for Fisher-Price

Created by Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity sits alongside a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy featuring the simple tagline: Let’s be kids.

Developed by Pentagram partner Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity coincides with a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy, which includes the mission statement “put the fun back into functional” and the “play back into playtime”. This is accompanied by a simple but effective new tagline: Let’s be kids.

The new identity centres on a simplified version of the brand’s historic red ‘awning’ mark, in which its four scalloped edges have been reduced to three. The logotype has been redrawn in all lowercase, with letterforms that are slightly more refined but still quirky. The hyphen between the names is now a semicircle, echoing the scalloped edge of the awning, as well as resembling a smile.

Working with type designer Jeremy Mickel, Oberman introduced a custom, semi sans serif typeface called Let’s Be Glyphs, which is partly inspired by the historic typeface Cheltenham, widely used in the toy maker’s early advertising and packaging.

An alternative typeface has also been developed called Let’s Be Glyphs Bouncy, which features rotated characters and an uneven baseline, while sans serif font Maax will be used as a secondary typeface.

National Trust 125th anniversary ad

Credits:
Agency: Wieden+Kennedy London
Creative Director: Flo Heiss
Creatives: Derek Lui, Harry Ingrams
Executive Creative Directors: Tony Davidson, Iain Tait
Production Company: All Mighty Pictures
Director/DOP: Anthony Dickenson
Executive Producer/Creative Director: Mark Harbour
Design Director: Karen Jane
Lead Designer: Alex Thursby- Pelham
Designer: Xueling Wang