Tag Archives: creative review

Pantone’s colour of the year

This year, the organisation has announced Very Peri as its prediction for the year ahead – describing it as “a dynamic periwinkle blue hue with a vivifying violet red undertone”.

“Blending the faithfulness and constancy of blue with the energy and excitement of red, this happiest and warmest of all the blue hues introduces an empowering mix of newness,” says Pantone in a press release. The company goes on to explain that the colour is chosen as a reflection of our changing physical and digital lives, trends in gaming, and the popularity of the nascent metaverse.

Driving home for Christmas

The ad by Anomaly is inspired by Rea’s journey back home to Middlesborough in 1978 after he got stuck in London on Christmas Eve and his wife drove 250 miles to collect him in their black Mini. The song prompted by this trip is now firmly on the UK’s recurring collection of classic Christmas songs and its words are likely known by everyone in the nation (whether they want to know them or not).

Credits:
Creative Agency: Anomaly
Production Company: Riff-Raff
Director: Ed Morris

Great big Christmas ad

Aldi takes on Dickens’ Christmas Carol, with Kevin the Carrot playing the Spirit of Christmas alongside Ebanana Scrooge. Marcus Rashford does a star turn as Marcus Radishford.

Clearly heavily influenced by John Lewis, this spot features a charming imaginary pet monster, but bears little connection to McDonald’s’ wider branding.

Heavy on the product shots, Lidl still manages to have fun with time travel (and Lidl-themed Christmas jumpers) in this humorous spot.

Amazon picks up on the popular theme of kindness in its cinematic global spot, which is soundtracked by Adele and references the impact of the pandemic on our lives.

Featuring an array of cameos from Little Simz to Jadon Sancho, JD Sports has delivered the coolest Christmas ad by some distance.

Disney tugs on the heartstrings with this animated short which sees a stepdad bonding with his new family at Christmas.

John Lewis’ festive ad

While the John Lewis Christmas ad has become an institution in the UK over the years thanks to its ability to tug at the nation’s heartstrings, no one has quite known what to expect from its festive campaign in the wake of the pandemic.

This time around, there is once again a distinct lack of Excitable Edgar, Moz the Monster or Buster the Boxer. Instead, Unexpected Guest takes viewers on a Christmas journey through the eyes of a boy called Nathan and a young space traveller called Skye.

Created by adam&eveDDB and directed by Mark Molloy, the film opens with Nathan befriending Skye after her spaceship crash lands on earth. Their relationships develops as Nathan introduces Skye to many of his family’s festive traditions, from gift giving to trying her first mince pie.

Credits:
Agency: adam&eveDDB
Director: Mark Molloy
Production company: Smuggler
Director of photography: Greig Fraser
Production Designer: Nathan Parker

Geltor’s identity by &Walsh 

The company has a new visual identity designed by creative agency &Walsh that draws on cells and nature for inspiration. While the existing logo remains, &Walsh fleshed out a new visual language around it, from typeface and colourways to illustration and imagery.

The 3D visuals are crisp without feeling overly clinical, and pop against the royal blue palette. The key assets involve orbs containing a smorgasbord of natural ingredients that inspired Geltor’s proteins. The result is like a Björk video frozen within a snow globe, complete with the surreal art direction we’ve come to expect from &Walsh.

The team also developed an iconography system and a set of line-based illustrations to help distil complex information and make the company feel warmer and more approachable.

A slick bike motif for Lyon’s 

At its heart is a bike-shaped monoline motif that blends together the infinity symbol, which has been repurposed as tyres, with a set of handlebars.

“The goal is for everyone to be able to recognise, reuse and draw the design with ease,” says the studio. “It evokes cycling, cycling routes, openness and freedom.”

According to Spintank, the identity offers a “positive, friendly and inclusive vision of the change we need to make in mobility”. It features in a teaser ad campaign that appeared across Lyon, as well as on social media, encouraging residents to participate.

London Olympia complex

Originally opened in 1886, Olympia London is undergoing a major redevelopment designed by Heatherwick Studio and SPPARC Architects, which aims to position the new area (known simply as Olympia) as a hub for creative arts in west London.

On top of the existing Olympia London events and exhibition spaces, there will be seven new buildings, including a new theatre, a live music arena, office and studio spaces, eateries and two hotels. The development is due to open to the public in 2024.

The branding for the area has been led by the London arm of SomeOne, with a brand strategy built around the idea that “it’s showtime”.

The Olympia wordmark, developed in collaboration with Miles Newlyn, follows a curve that draws on the arches of the historic Olympia Exhibition Halls. The primary typeface is Right Grotesk by Montreal-based foundry Pangram Pangram, and appears in various styles and weights as a nod to the venue’s vintage exhibition posters.

Meanwhile the letter ‘O’ has inspired a ring-shaped motif that appears across accompanying visuals. The circular band is made up of elements alluding to the area’s future attractions – musical instruments, office tables, food and drink – rendered in CG with the help of weareseventeen and 3D artist Ingrid Tsy. While reminiscent of the BBC One circle idents, the circle works nicely as a framing device, particularly when animated.

Insurance firm Next get new branding by Collins

Next’s new branding and tone of voice are designed to steer clear of the clichés surrounding insurance companies, which “are either your overly earnest protectors from doom, or rely on the absurdity of animals and athletes to help you remember them”, according to design agency Collins, which led the brand redesign.

The team took an illustrated approach to the brand visuals, which feature bright palettes and a cast of friendly, motivational characters, including a toolbox and a chef’s hat.

The new branding includes a tagline imploring small business owners to ‘get going’ and messaging that focuses less on risk and more on opportunity.

Next has also commissioned small business owners and creators around the US to contribute to its corporate apparel and gift items, photography and videography, and custom on-hold music.

Scouts new Squirrels

The Squirrels programme aims to support young people in deprived communities most affected by the pandemic and also bring in families that may be new to Scouts. Its branding is bright, playful and fun and features its own logo, featuring a squirrel as the ‘S’.

The logo will eventually be used alone, when the Squirrels brand is more established, but initially will be used alongside the distinctive Scouts symbol to show it is part of the same family. The colours of the brand are also an extension of the main Scouts colour palette of red and yellow, with a number of woodland-themed colours added.



“Our approach to the Squirrels brand idea was to go back to the beginning of the Scouts story – Brownsea Island,” says Jamie Ellul, creative director at Supple Studio. “It felt appropriate to use the island’s flora and fauna as inspiration for the visual language and colour – especially as Brownsea is home to a brood of rare red squirrels.

Frontline19

In recent reports that two in five frontline staff are suffering with PTSD as a result of the pandemic – nearly double the rate of recent military veterans. While such information is clearly damning in terms of how those who bore the brunt of the pandemic are now coping, it is difficult to quantify what this means to their daily lives.

To help articulate this, and also to encourage the public to leave messages of support for frontline workers via a free phone service called Hopeline19, adam&eveDDB has created a film and poster campaign for the charity Frontine19. The film, which is a difficult watch, tells the stories of some of those on the frontline, from ambulance workers to ICU doctors and nurses, and how their experiences have affected their personal lives.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dH_sJEpqDSY&t=120s

Accompanying the film are outdoor, print and radio ads that also ask members of the public to leave messages of gratitude and support on Hopeline19. These will be moderated and then uploaded so that frontline workers can call and listen to kind words from the public, and targeted media will be displayed in and around hospitals to make frontline workers aware of the service.

“We’re humbled at what the doctors, nurses, emergency responders and thousands of other unsung heroes have achieved over the past 18 months,” says Ant Nelson, ECD at adam&eveDDB. “But while their actions may be heroic, they are human beings as vulnerable to mental health problems as the rest of us. Frontline19 has already done so much in such a short time, but we need to make sure their work can carry on and in turn help NHS workers get through this traumatic time.”

Credits:
Agency: adam&eveDDB
CCO: Richard Brim
ECDs: Ant Nelson, Mike Sutherland
Creative Directors: Darren Beresford, Richard Gayton
Creatives: Darren Beresford, Richard Gayton
Production Company: Academy
Director: Novemba