Tag Archives: creative review

Morag Myerscough created a ribbon of colour

The latest installation by the artist sees Myerscough turn a street canopy into a stained glass-style artwork that casts bright colours onto the pedestrians beneath.

The commission is part of the ongoing regeneration of the city, which has been named City of Culture for 2021. Titled Endless Ribbon Connecting Us, the piece is located in a canopy-covered section of Hertford Street, which has been given a drastic makeover by the artist.

Myerscough’s idea for the space began with her research into Coventry Cathedral and its stained glass windows, as well as the ribbon-weaving industry that was a key part of the city’s business in the early 1700s up until the 1860s.

As well as painting her trademark blocks of colour onto the walls of the walkway – and installing a row of trailing greenery – Myerscough has covered the canopy overhead in blues, pinks, oranges and yellows.

As the sun shines through, the installation bathes the walkway – which is a key route for people coming into the city by rail – in coloured light.

National Museums Liverpool new branding

National Museums Liverpool has unveiled an updated visual identity designed to bring together its various institutions, which under the previous disparate branding left visitors unaware that the venues were all part of the museum group.

The new branding by design agency SomeOne covers seven of the city’s museums: Museum of Liverpool, World Museum, International Slavery Museum, Maritime Museum, Walker Art Gallery, Sudley House and Lady Lever Art Gallery. It also elevates the group’s sub brands Hosted By, its corporate events arm, and House of Memories, its dementia awareness initiative.

The new identity revolves around a waveform symbol which when highlighted reveals the letters NML upon close inspection. While these initials might not be immediately clear to the casual passer-by, it comes to life in animations. SomeOne also developed a new black, white and fuchsia palette, a set of icons, and a brand tagline for National Museums Liverpool, which promises to be ‘never dull’.

Soho businesses united under graphic new branding

Over 20 Soho businesses have been brought together under the GoGoSoho brand campaign, ranging from shops to restaurants to entertainment venues. Among them are iconic jazz club Ronnie Scott’s, record store Sister Ray, and part book shop, part sex shop Soho’s Original Adult Store. The campaign is supported by the Mayor of London’s office, Westminster Council and the Soho Society.

The GoGoSoho wordmark also appears across the campaign, featuring a new font, FS Marlborough, specially created in a collaboration between Fontsmith and M&C Saatchi and based on an original street sign in Great Marlborough Street. 

The campaign will be rolled out across flyposters, signage, social media and a microsite hosting film content. “We’re passionate about getting Londoners back to support the businesses we’d hate to lose,” said M&C Saatchi joint head of design Andy Harris, who created the illustrations. “Every illustration is as unique as the shops we’re showcasing – the campaign style is as bold and quirky as the people and places we love.”

Toronto Time campaign

The bleak but powerful message was created by Toronto agency Berners Bowie Lee for the Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas (TABIA), and aims to remind those dwelling in the city that shopping local could mean the difference between life or death for many independent businesses.
Toronto has had some of the strictest and longest-running lockdowns in North America, with gyms closed and indoor dining in restaurants banned since October 9. Non-essential retail stores have been restricted to curbside pick up only, while hairdressers and barbers have been shut down since November 23.
As the city slowly begins an easing of restrictions, Buy Toronto Time hopes to remind people to take action to help local businesses.

Credits:
Agency: Berners Bowie Lee
Co-founders/Creative Directors: Devon Williamson, Michael Murray
Production Company: Untitled Films
Director/DOP: Jesse Louttit

Beatport rebrand

Beatport, which was founded in 2004, offers a vast catalogue of buyable tracks as well as a chart, and several sub brands including Beatport Link – which allows DJs to build and stream playlists.

The redesign is the first brand update for Beatport since 2012, and marks a move away from the company’s headphones motif, which has been in use since the company’s founding. The new ‘endorsing marque’ symbol borrows heavily from the shapes of vinyl records and styluses, and accompanies an updated wordmark.

Beatport had previously used a slightly squashed, futuristic-looking typeface for its identity, which has been replaced with a more sedate sans serif that the studio says can be combined with various type expressions and tailored to different categories of music.

Shelter launches new ad campaign

Shelter’s new brand identity is created by Superunion and features a red arrow formed by brushstrokes. The intention is to bring a sense of the activism that was at the heart of the charity when it was formed in the 1960s back to the logo, while still referencing the shape of a roof which was a central part of Shelter’s previous mark.

The new ad campaign is created by ad agency Who Wot Why and features imagery of real people affected by the housing emergency projected onto buildings and homes. It is set to a track by Wretch 32.

The film is accompanied by a striking set of outdoor, print and online ads, featuring bold text and striking black-and-white portraits shot by photographer Tom Cockram.

The campaign, and new identity, aim to return some urgency and fight to the charity’s messaging, emphasised by the tagline, Fight for Home. “The housing emergency has escalated to staggering levels, impacting the lives of one in three of us,” says Willow Williams, head of marketing at Shelter. “Meanwhile, the global health crisis has made things a whole lot worse. This situation demanded an urgent and unflinching campaign to inspire everyone to join Shelter in the fight for home.”

Credits:
Brand purpose and Identity: Superunion and The Sustainability Practice at Ogilvy
Ad agency: Who Wot Why
ECD/Founder: Sean Thompson
Creatives: Jack Walker, Ali Dickinson, Rebecca Conyngham-Hynes, Dan Scott
Photographer: Tom Cockram
Production Company: Independent Films
Directors: Sarah Gavron, Anu Henriques

Pinterest new brand identity

The platform is used for finding inspiration, sharing imagery and creating digital mood boards, lending itself to the cut and paste aesthetic that underpins the new look. Led by Made Thought, the new identity aims to put the people who use it – dubbed ‘Pinners’ – front and centre by creating unique scenes reflecting their various interests.

The art direction feels fun and eccentric, thanks to the disparate imagery and use of flexible colour schemes rather than a fixed palette, while the slant of the new sans-serif typeface created by Grilli Type aims to represent “a literal lean into the future”, according to Made Thought.

“We set out to give Pinterest a brand identity as fluid, personal and creative as its own platform — driven by the meandering choices of the user and their ever-evolving dreams of what might be,” says Made Thought creative director Alistair Webb.

Child food poverty campaign

No child should have to go to bed hungry, but the UK’s latest statistics on child food poverty highlight a systemic problem that urgently needs tackling. Pre-Covid, 30% of all children across the country were living in poverty, while food insecurity in families with children has increased dramatically in lockdown.

Launched in response to the government’s new Healthy Start voucher, Rashford has joined forces with Michelin-starred chef Tom Kerridge on a new national campaign, Full Time: Get Cooking with Marcus & Tom.

The campaign, which aims to equip children with vital life skills to support their navigation into adult life, is supported by Facebook and Instagram and aims to eliminate stigma around the use of Healthy Start vouchers.

Kerridge has created 52 simple, family-friendly recipes as part of the 12-month-long programme, which encourages parents and carers to enjoy one hour of valuable time each week cooking with their children, and puts emphasis on recipes that use limited equipment and longer shelf life goods.

Recipes will be available to pick up in various forms from selected supermarkets every Sunday morning. Each recipe will feature a QR code linking through to the Full Time Instagram page, where users can access short-form tutorial videos hosted by Tom, Marcus and a selection of celebrity guests.

London-based design studio The Clearing was brought in to lead on the branding for Full Time, with a brief to develop the campaign’s visual identity, name and strategy.

The result is a colourful take on home cooking, which swaps off-putting, health-focused language for more casual phrases such as ‘Get stuck in’ and ‘It’s time to fill up’.

Collins Modern Classics gives some much-loved books a new look

These new editions bring a fresh set of covers to well-known titles, wrapping them in clashing two-colour palettes and featuring graphics inspired by the contents of each title.

Jo Thomson, deputy art director at 4th Estate and William Collins, says the art department was briefed to create jackets that would look nothing like other classic book editions, but still be timeless enough to stand apart from current trends.

Drawing on her love of typography, Thomson began playing around with designs that used huge lettering and decorative fonts, paired together with graphic images or photos. The real breakthrough for the design came when she shifted the authors’ names away from the centre of the cover and off to one side – allowing the type and imagery to do the heavy lifting. The graphics have also been given a print grain filter to add some extra texture.

Each book has its own unique colour palette, with Jung Chang’s Wild Swans wrapped in mint green and neon red, and Jeffrey Eugenides’ The Virgin Suicides enjoying a forest green and bubblegum pink.

“One of the key things that we wanted to do was open these books up to people who haven’t read them before,” Thomson. “For books that are older, we wanted to give them a new lease of life with a cover that’s more vibrant and modern than previous classics have been.”