Tag Archives: creative review

Beer brand Caravelle

Design studio Hey has worked with restaurant and brewery Caravelle on creating colourful packaging for its new range of craft beers. The Barcelona-based studio previously teamed up with Caravelle back in 2017 on its initial beer range, and was enlisted once again to help it flesh out the existing design system as the brewery relocates to a larger location to keep up with demand.

Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle
Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle
Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle

The packaging takes a geometric turn across the rest of the range, with a pixelated bit graphic applied to Galactic IPA and a colourful striped design showcasing the Electric Relaxation XPA.

City of culture 2021

The brand identity for Coventry Moves embraces the city’s past, present, and future, and contains icons and shapes inspired by brutalism and modernist architecture

The identity has been designed by Uncommon Creative Studio, and is inspired by brutalist elements and modernist architecture in a nod to the city’s rebuilding after World War II. Based on a modular system of squares and simple shapes, the identity also aims to play on the innovations, movements and stories that have come to characterise the city. The graphic icon in place of the ‘O’ for instance, can be interchanged with various circle-like symbols to represent the industries that have played a role in Coventry’s make-up, such as bicycles, clocks and watches, aircraft and music.

The bright blue that features throughout is tied to Coventry’s medieval past as a centre of the UK’s textile industry. Distilled from the colour of historical yarns, the hue has been named Moving Blue and adds brightness to an otherwise monochrome aesthetic.

LEC lockdown identity

DesignStudio has created the branding for the League of Legends European Championship, which aims to build a sense of community in light of lockdown measures.

While the global pandemic has caused major disruption to the vast majority of sporting events, the world of esports has fared comparatively well. In fact, traditional sports have entered the esports landscape more than ever before, with tournaments like the virtual Grand Prix pitting traditional athletes and gamers against one another for the first time.

Yet the impact on events has still filtered down to the gaming world, with significant tournaments such as the League of Legends European Championship (LEC) having to forgo live crowds and in-person experiences at the finals this summer, and instead rely solely on streaming to audiences online.

With the crowd element removed, DesignStudio is aiming to engage viewers of the LEC Summer Finals 2020 by creating a dynamic identity for the event. The identity and motion graphics tap into the language of social media and online communities with hashtags and arcade-inspired emojis, while the tickertape effect evokes the atmosphere of major arena events. As part of the project, DesignStudio also developed a quiz, as well as a futuristic teaser film that acknowledges no arena could be ‘found’ for the tournament, before culminating in a range of motivational messages about the event.

The team looked to 8-bit graphics and classic arcade games for inspiration, yet the overall look and feel is decidedly contemporary – so much so that certain design elements would look quite at home in club culture.

LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity
LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity

The LEC Summer Finals 2020 branding aims to further this sense of pride and uniqueness in the esports community, in a bid to continue “breaking those entertainment barriers”. That design cues seen in electronic music can exist comfortably in the esports space indicates how preconceptions about the gaming community are being eradicated. “It doesn’t have to be geeky and nerdy and weird. The same people that play those games also attend electronic music festivals,” Ng says. “Why does there need to be a differentiation?”

LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity

Waze’s new identity

Pentagram partner Natasha Jen has rebranded the Google-owned GPS app, introducing a whole of host of cute creatures that mimic the many moods of drivers on the road.

Pentagram partner Natasha Jen was commissioned to create a new visual identity based on Waze’s crowdsourcing roots and collaborative spirit, working in collaboration with the app’s head of creative Jake Shaw.

At the heart of the rebrand is the updated Wazer symbol, which now features a rounder, more upright form to emphasise its speech bubble shape and the app’s focus on communication. The accompanying refreshed logotype is based on Boing, a sans serif typeface with rounded corners designed to give a friendlier look.

Jen’s team also developed a new visual language for the app called Block by Block, which is inspired by the modular design of city grids and road systems. The geometric grid ensures consistency across everything from infographics to email templates, featuring a flexible array of colourful block-like shapes.

Illustration has always been a big part of Waze’s visual identity. The new branding brings greater clarity to this style, with Jen and her team redrawing existing icons and establishing a style guide for new illustrations going forward.

TGI Friday’s new identity

The first ever TGI Fridays opened on the corner of New York’s 63rd and 1st in 1965. It was swiftly popularised not as the casual-dining family restaurant that it is today, but as a singles bar for cocktail-swilling young adults in Manhattan; one of the first of its kind and apparently the inspiration for Tom Cruise’s bartender character in the film Cocktail.

More recently, and much like the rest of the food scene on the high street, the restaurant chain has struggled to stand out against the raft of independent burger joints and street food venues that dominate our cities.

Working with the company’s new leadership team, SomeOne has been rethinking the TGI Fridays brand over the past six months, stripping it back down to a tagline that captures the essence of its New York origins: The Fridays Feeling.

“Our vision is to make Fridays famous again so we needed to breathe fresh life into the brand by relevantly leveraging the past,” says the chain’s CEO, Robert B Cook. “The Fridays Feeling is the inspiration for our new food and drink menus and a service plan designed to consistently deliver the best guest experiences and a generosity of spirit.”

SomeOne started by reducing the brand name down to just Fridays, based on the fact that the meaning of TGI had become lost and confused over time.

Another design feature from the restaurant’s roots is the use of bold vertical red and white stripes, which nod to the original awnings of the 1965 bar, and also take inspiration from historic circus company Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey.

Witty Snickers ad

Snickers is the latest brand to release an ad that would have made zero sense to us a year ago, but is likely to raise a much needed grin in our weird new existence.

The spot highlights some of the habits we might have got into in our Zoom-heavy set up, and why it pays to be cautious as we emerge blinking into a more social world again.

Credits:
Agency: BBDO New York
CCO: David Lubars
ECDs: Gianfranco Arena, Peter Kain
Creative directors: Scott Mahoney, Dan Oliva
Production company: O Positive
Director: Jess Coulter

Vasava uses hand-drawn type to reimagine children’s classics

Barcelona-based agency Vasava takes a trip down memory lane by reimagining classic children’s book covers in a bid to encourage a new generation of readers.

Some of the titles Vasava has renewed, such as Treasure Island and Around the World in 80 Days, are books less popular with kids today, so the agency adopted an eye-catching concept. “We incorporated illustrations into the lettering, creating vignettes, which would act as a visual synopsis for each novel,” says the studio. “The comic book style was paired with bright colour palettes to create a happy and inviting collection of books that any kid would proudly display on their bookshelf.”

Cover for Alice in Wonderland

Each title has its own lettering which hints towards the story within, such as Peter Pan’s flowing type that makes the reader think of pirate flags and Wendy’s old-fashioned nighty. To really bring the covers to life though, Vasava took a detailed approach when deciding what the illustrations should contain and they started by highlighting the key characters, locations and objects from each of the novels. 

Cover for Peter Pan

The collection of covers pop with vibrant, clashing colours and are crammed with intricate illustrations. What ties the whole series together is the vintage treatment of each title, reinforcing the idea of the books as literary classics.

Cover for Jungle Book
Cover for The Wizard of Oz

Liberty rebrand

The luxury department store has unveiled new branding by Pentagram’s Harry Pearce that borrows cues from the historic sign that first hung over the door.

Liberty logo by Pentagram

The new logo puts the name of the store front and centre, dropping the reference to its London home and instead moving it to additional brand assets alongside a redesigned crest. The iconic deep purple hue remains intact across the packaging design, while the gold seen across the lettering has been “refined”.

Liberty logo evolution

The new branding draws upon Liberty’s lengthy history, in particular the original sign used at its Great Malborough Street location, though the historic link may appear subtle to casual onlookers thanks to the identity’s decidedly sleeker look.

The connection to the past is established in smaller details like the full-stop, which has been reinstated on the wordmark as per the original sign. Meanwhile, the angular serifs have been dropped from the logotype in favour of a new sans-serif typeface similarly rooted in the original design.

“The process of rebranding Liberty has been one of craft, archaeology and refinement,” says Pearce. “The logotype itself hails from the lettering in the original sign above the Great Marlborough Street front door, carefully redrawn to make it the most authentic logotype in Liberty’s history.”

Yale unlocks the sun

Founded in 1840, Yale began life as a New York-based manufacturer specialising in handmade bank locks. Today, it is one of the longest-running international businesses in the world, with million of Yale locks in use worldwide.

Yale’s refreshed visual identity includes a bespoke typeface by Jeremy Tankard and new UX, motion and sonic branding, all of which are centred around its distinctive sun-shaped logo. “We looked for something universal that would be understood around the globe. Yale already had a round yellow logo so that turned out to be a gift we could work from,” says GW+Co principal Gilmar Wendt.

“We landed on the sun as the core design idea because Yale is a warm and positive brand. You can rely on it always being there (even if you don’t see it) giving you peace of mind, and it is a big idea that is universally understood.”

The rebrand is currently rolling out internally, and will be seen externally later on in the year. For Wendt and the rest of the GW+Co team, the project has exemplified the challenges of rebranding a historic company like Yale for the digital era. “There is a need to create a future vision that builds on the past, rather than brushing it aside,” he says.

OneFootball

DesignStudio has created vibrant new branding for the football app, including an updated logo, a visual generator and a content strategy built around the idea of a ‘vibesmith’

“[OneFootball] needed a brand that adapted to Generation Z,” explains Vinay Mistry, design director at DesignStudio. “Generation Z is a generation of contrasts: they’re constantly adapting, they’re constantly changing, and football’s actually very similar. The rhythm of the game changes constantly as well. It made us think, actually there’s some lovely synergy there – can we define a personality for OneFootball that represents that?”

OneFootball identity by Design Studio

At the core of the project was the creation of a new logo. While researching the existing logo, the design team noticed its resemblance to the pictogramsdeveloped for the 1972 Olympic Games held in Munich, and also felt it was too similar to WhatsApp’s logo.

However, the team didn’t scrap the old logo altogether. Instead, they broke it down to its key parts – legs and football – and repurposed these elements into a new graphic forming a number one and a football in reference to the brand name. The new design is immediately more contemporary, partly because it does away with the gendered implications of the old logo.

OneFootball identity by Design Studio