Tag Archives: creative review

Simmons & Simmons rebrand

The rebrand is designed to reflect Simmons & Simmons’ interest and investment in emerging technology, as well as attract keen young graduates that might otherwise be lured away by Silicon Valley. It’s an attempt to stand out from the sea of other law firms, who for years have relied on the same old branding to attract clients and employees.

“Law and lawyers are lagging well behind the rest of the world when it comes to branding, marketing and things like that,” SomeOne founder Simon Manchipp told CR. “They’ve always relied on really big brains attracting other big brains, but I think they’ve woken up and started to understand that brand is not just a logo, typeface and colour. It’s reputation, and the visual identity helps manage that reputation.”

FACEBOOK rebrand

Facebook has launched a new company brand of the same name (this time in capitals) to differentiate the company from the app, which will continue using its current logo and branding.

The new branding aims to make Facebook’s ownership of other apps and products – including Instagram, Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, Oculus and Portal – clearer to users. This follows a decision made in June to add the tagline ‘from Facebook’ within all of Facebook’s apps and services.

The new identity includes a capitalised wordmark in a bespoke typeface and an ever-changing colour palette that will adapt depending on the product it appears on. It was carried out by Facebook’s internal design team in collaboration with UK-based type foundry Dalton Maag and brand consultants Saffron.

Facebook’s design team said the rebrand was built on three “design behaviours”: ‘clarity’, ’empathy’ and ‘creating space’. The aim – according to the team – was to create a brand that “simplifies and builds understanding”, is “respectful of context and environment” in which it operates and creates space for sharing people’s stories.

With its use of capital letters, a custom font and rounded corners, the word mark is designed to make a clear distinction between company and app, which uses a lower case word mark in a bold sans font.

“We designed the new company wordmark with clarity and openness in mind. It’s built on a stable structure through the use of consistent stroke width, harmonised capital letters and a horizontal emphasis. The generous spacing and open letterforms allow clarity at small sizes, and the subtle softening of corners and diagonals adds a sense of optimism,” said the team.

Paris 2024 Olympic logo

The organising committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games has revealed the logo and visual identity for Paris 2024. The logo combines two iconic symbols associated with the Games – a gold medal and the Olympic torch – with an image of Marianne, a female figure representing the French Republic.

The design sees the Paralympic and Olympic Games share a logo for the first time. The organising committee says in a statement that the use of Marianne is both a nod to the sport’s heritage – namely the fact that women athletes were first allowed to compete at the 1900 Olympic Games in Paris – and a homage to female athletes. The committee also says that Marianne represents “the revolutionary spirit” of the Games, and the fact that the Games “belong to the people”.

Fox’s rebrand

The Fox logo has undergone a subtle redesign, with a chunky new version also created for animations, which show the original logo morphing into the geometric version. According to Trollbäck+Company, the studio reduced the updated mark down to its core components, broke it apart, and then used the pieces as abstract shapes and patterns across the entire rebrand. These ‘broken letters’ will be used in patterns and ‘creative framing’, and play a role in everything from social media posts to huge billboards. The updated identity – which Fox is calling a ‘brand evolution – will now appear across the 17 stations owned by the entertainment company, as well as its 100+ affiliate stations.

According to Alex Moulton, Chief Creative Officer at Trollbäck+Company, the work is intended to position Fox as “an entertainment brand that’s forging culture”. The studio’s Executive Creative Director, Elliott Chaffer, adds, “The way the industry is today, the middle of the road is the best place to get run over. We needed to bring back and champion the brand’s ability to take big swings and bigger risks.”

Thierry Noir

Noir’s practice has a strong emphasis on line and aims to simplify forms to their most basic elements. This simplicity reflected the necessity of painting quickly outdoors in a hazardous environment with very real risks to his personal safety. Noir reacted to his environment and his monsters are a metaphor for the Wall itself, each one relating to his experiences or feelings of what he calls a ‘killing machine’.

Freedom Boulevard Mural

Thierry Noir Los Angeles NOHO Mural-21Thierry Noir Los Angeles NOHO Mural-34

Shapes, Hackney Wick

Thierry-Noir-Shapes-12

The Acton Giant

Thierry Noir - Acton Mural18Thierry-Noir-Acton-2

Sunset Boulevard

Noir x Sunset Boulevard 4Noir x Sunset Boulevard 3

Temple’s identity

Leeds’ new district visual identity has been designed by local studio Thompson Brand Partners and is named after its landmark Temple Works building, which features a distinctly Egyptian façade.

The long-abandoned, Grade I-listed building is the centrepiece of a regeneration project being led by developer CEG. The newly created district of Temple is set to be home to a host of offices, homes and leisure spaces.

Local studio Thompson Brand Partners was chosen to create the visual identity for the district, which needed to show that it “knows where it comes from”, according to ECD Ian Thompson.

The type-focused logo looks to reflect the façade of Temple Works, while ancient Egypt is also the inspiration for the colour palette, which includes yellow ochre and Egyptian blue.

Boots Christmas Campaign

Themed ‘Bootiques’ will be popping up across the UK to help you make the right purchase for your loved one, whether it’s the moody tweenager or the person who loves working out almost as much as they love talking about working out.

In a welcome departure from its more sentimental efforts from the last couple of years, the retailer is going big on experiential this time around, launching hundreds of pop-up Bootiques (geddit?) both in-store and online, which are themed around the personalities of its tricky-to-buy-for customers.

A number of these personalities are the focal point of an accompanying campaign film created by WPP’s Team WBA, which includes Ogilvy UK, Mediacom, Geometry and Bookmark, who have also worked with True Story.

Agencies: Ogilvy UK, Mediacom, Geometry, Bookmark
CCO: Dede Laurentino
Creative Consultant: Dan Fisher
Chief ECD: Jules Chalkley
ECD: Sam Cartmell
Experiential ECD – Elspeth Lynn
Creatives: Tom Madden & Morgan Hinds–Shorland, Naomi Nicholl & Lily James, Tony Malcolm & Marc Bennett
Design Director: Sian Hughes
Design: Taylor Bates, Rob Hare
Production Company: Academy
Director: Si&Ad

KFC shows why turkey is second rate!

The ads are set to the classic tune Deck The Halls, but the soundtrack breaks down as each step inevitably spirals out of control (just like it often does on the big day). Each ad finishes up with KFC’s message for the holidays: “Good luck on the 25th. Until then, we’ve got you.”

Agency: Mother
Production company: Stink
Director: Golden Wolf
Music: Wonderkid Sound

Apple’s Christmas ad is a festive tearjerker

It’s not often advertising is genuinely moving but The Surprise really tugs at the heartstrings, and you could be forgiven if you well up slightly watching it. The background music, borrowed from the equally heart-wrenching film Up, only adds to the emotion.

The ad – which was created by Apple’s agency TBWA\Media Arts Lab, and directed by Mark Molloy – isn’t the first time the tech giant has shown a more relatable side to phones and tablets.

Ikea’s first Christmas ad

Ikea has a reputation for creating refreshingly unconventional ads. Recent campaigns have featured everything from breakdancing curtains and cushions to recreated versions of the lounges from The Simpsons, Friends and Stranger Things.

The retailer’s first Christmas campaign in the UK and Ireland also eschews sentimental festive clichés, instead opting for something a little more obscure.

But with a number of quick home fixes, they soon manage to shut up their inanimate critics, and can crack on with their dinner plans unfazed.

While it’s good to see Ikea steering clear of festive schmaltz, the suggestion that we have to cover up that crack in the wall or replace an outdated but well-loved mirror at a time of year when we’re already up to our eyeballs leaves a slightly bitter aftertaste, meaning this ad ultimately lacks some of the charm of Ikea’s other recent campaigns.

Agency: Mother
Production Company: MJZ
Director: Tom Kuntz
Creative Director: James Sindle
Production Designer: Chris Oddy
Director of Photography: Chris Soos
VFX: Electric Theatre Collective