Nourish Snacks New Look

“Nourish had already carved out a piece of that market, but the brand had been launched principally for online sales. Now that it’s competing in the grocery aisle, clamoring for attention with more established names, the challenge for Nourish will be differentiating itself from the zillion other choices out there.

That was one reason Joy Bauer had her brand’s packaging completely redone. Most snack-food containers follow the time-worn strategy of slapping a huge brand name on the front along with a (usually idealized) photograph of the food. In fact, that’s pretty much the approach Nourish took when it first launched in 2014.”

“This time, the brand threw out the rule book in favor of a design that looks like a melding of carnival signage with 1970s TV game-show set, heavy on the browns and oranges, with the letters spelling ‘Nourish’ each sitting in a circle floating above a field of stripes. (There is a photo of the snack on the front, but it’s very small.) The snack bag is the work of legendary graphic designer Brian Collins, whose client list includes the likes of Nike, Google, Chobani and Facebook.

‘The crazy, bold diagonals on the front of of the Nourish package are inspired by the colorful stripes on snacks sold at the circus—popcorn, peanuts, cotton candy,’ Collins explained. ‘All those striped containers held the promise of fun and delight.’”

VIA RAIZ

Mexican-based agency TOROPINTO has come out with the packaging and branding for VIA RAIZ, a line of beautiful handmade contemporary Mexican products. The overall imagery is composed of patterns made up of symbols that tie in the traditional with the modern.

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Coffee Drink with a face

mousegraphics designed the adorable packaging for the AHA Dear Coffee Series.

“The brief was that they needed a logo and packaging for our cold coffee drink. The target consumer is a consumer with a working routine and busy schedule.”

“The Chinese name of the product translates phonetically to ‘AHA’. We decided to turn this fact into an aesthetic argument and used it to create a logo with anthropomorphic references. The specific coffee containers are defined by the use of this logo and, in the case where mousegraphics also designed a cup-like container, the logo became a decisive structural element. In this way the product logo animates the packaging with a friendly, memorable face.”

Tea bags or hand bags!

KOREFE. Kolle Rebbe Form und Entwicklung designed these adorable and clever tea bags that resemble actual handbags. The individual bags even come in tiny shopping bags as well!“To bring this project to life, we worked together with renown handbag designer Ayzit Bostan to create five limited-edition tea bags in the style of iconic handbags. The selection was handcrafted with cordless silk and permeable cotton and designed to fit perfectly with the personality of each brew. The Teabag Collection was packaged in a handmade box and sent by direct mail to long-standing customers. In addition to that, they made their public premiere at Berlin Fashion Week, Germany’s most important fashion event. This is where they quickly grabbed the attention of fashion lovers and bloggers.”

TypeNote

London type foundry Fontsmith has launched a print magazine dedicated to lettering and type design. Issue one of TypeNotes includes a look at great type for TV and film, choosing the right typeface for an ad campaign and the challenges of creating Cyrillic fonts.

The magazine was launched to mark Fontsmith’s 20th birthday. Founder Jason Smith says it celebrates the foundry’s love of type and the craft behind it. “TypeNotes is a collection of ideas about type and design that we hope will be something to keep and collect…. My ambition is to share our little world of craft – what we do and what makes us think,” he says.

Issue one of TypeNotes, a typogrpahy magazine published by London type foundry FontsmithIssue one of TypeNotes, a typogrpahy magazine published by London type foundry FontsmithIssue one of TypeNotes, a typogrpahy magazine published by London type foundry FontsmithIssue one of TypeNotes, a typogrpahy magazine published by London type foundry FontsmithIssue one of TypeNotes, a typogrpahy magazine published by London type foundry FontsmithIssue one of TypeNotes, a typogrpahy magazine published by London type foundry Fontsmith

Issue one is priced at £10 and each copy comes with a free poster of typographic terms designed by Exeter studio Believe.

You can order copies here.

Aardman launches Morph emoji stickers for iMessage

In something of a match made in heaven, animation studio Aardman has released a pack of iMessage stickers in celebration of classic shape-changing character Morph’s 40th anniversary. Some 16 Morph emojis and 12 animated stickers are included in the pack, which can be downloaded from the App Store.

According to Aardman, Morph co-creator Peter Lord made each of the emojis from modelling clay before graphics and animations were added. And as you can imagine, Morph offers up a wide range of expressions – the set includes everything from a crying, laughing or sleeping Morph to a Morph ‘poo’ emoji.

Tap Espresso & Salad Bar branding

Christos Zafeiriadis designed the branding and packaging for Tap Espresso & Salad Bar, a hidden gem tucked away in the lobby of a high-rise commercial building in Sydney, Australia. Tap is proud to source local coffees and provide delicious lunch options, which even includes a salad bar with over 40 different fresh ingredients. 

The identity and all the applications consist of illustrated elements that one can find in the cafe. The color and material selection alongside the industrial space create a friendly atmosphere, helping customers wind down and relax.

The illustrations and typography styles are flashy, fun, and reminiscent of retro diner graphics one might find in the 50s. The illustrations of business people also add a nice personalized touch to the overall branding and illustration. The fresh colors pop against the muted backgrounds to allow overall for an eye-catching design. 

Playing Cards that Explore 4 Distinct Moments in Art and Design History

ArtAndMachine_RH_Website_032317“This deck of cards is a look at four specific moments in the history of art and design as it has wrestled to incorporate machine technology (or push against it). Each suit in the deck focuses on one of these four moments—the new typography of the Bauhaus era, mid-century book cover design, the late 20th century silk-screened poster aesthetic, and contemporary art & design in the age of mobile.”ArtAndMachine_RH_Website_032317ArtAndMachine_RH_Website_032317ArtAndMachine_RH_Website_032317