National Trust 125th anniversary ad

Credits:
Agency: Wieden+Kennedy London
Creative Director: Flo Heiss
Creatives: Derek Lui, Harry Ingrams
Executive Creative Directors: Tony Davidson, Iain Tait
Production Company: All Mighty Pictures
Director/DOP: Anthony Dickenson
Executive Producer/Creative Director: Mark Harbour
Design Director: Karen Jane
Lead Designer: Alex Thursby- Pelham
Designer: Xueling Wang

Eco at heart packaging inspired by the Ocean

“Eco at Heart create beautifully designed reusable and environmentally-friendly products. A trip to Bali left brand founders Stu and Davina feeling shocked at the amount of plastic-covered beaches they encountered. They later learnt that Indonesia is the second-largest (after China) contributor of pollutants in the ocean and it was evident that single-use plastics, particularly straws – were the most problematic items.

With the ocean providing the main visual inspiration behind the brand, we took references from the coastline to develop the identity system. I created a series of watermark patterns to convey the organic essence of the business and convey a feeling of calm with soft shapes and natural textures.”

Editorial photograph

VW waves goodbye to the Beetle

The spot, titled The Last Mile, is created by ad agency Johannes Leonardo and set to a version of Let It Be by The Beatles sung by a children’s choir. It is bathed in nostalgia for the Beetle, with references to its place in pop culture history included throughout.

It might seem odd for a brand to put so much emphasis on a product that is no longer available to buy, but the release of the ad forms part of an ongoing marketing push by VW to move on from the global diesel emissions scandal that severely damaged its reputation in 2015.

The new ad follows a previous campaign that aims to highlight its move into electric vehicles. As with The Last Mile, those ads also leverage the brand’s glorious past.

Electric vehicles are not mentioned explicitly in the Beetle spot though there is a lengthy scene that references environmentalism via wind power and the closing tagline – ‘Where one road ends, another begins’ – is an attempt to look to the future. The hope is clearly that the big love for Volkswagen that the world once had can be used to redeem its standing with consumers and allow both the brand – as well as its products – to move on from its difficult last few years.

Credits:
Agency: Johannes Leonardo
Production company: Nexus Studios
Director: Fx Goby

OKCupid

The dating app’s ads highlight the issues that matter most to its users – and tell us it’s OK to choose partners based on their political views.

OKCupid’s Ask Yourself campaign tackles the subject head on, with a series of ads that tell us it’s OK to select partners based on their political leanings, their attitudes towards gender or even their views on abortion. Outdoor posters feature lines such as ‘It’s OK not to date a man who won’t vote for a woman’ and ‘It’s OK to choose to only date someone who’s pro-choice’.

Featuring artwork by Xaviera López, it was created by Mekanism and follows Wieden+Kennedy’s witty DTF ads, which offered some surprising new takes on an acronym that has become ubiquitous on dating apps.

Netherlands new identity.

As part of the country’s new identity, Studio Dumbar has designed a new wordmark for the Netherlands which gives a subtle nod to the national flower.

The wordmark combines the country acronym, NL and the tulip, the national flower. “The tulip is the most famous symbol of the Netherlands,” says Tom Dorresteijn, strategy director at Studio Dumbar. “But we wanted to steer clear of an obvious literal tulip as the symbol is too much connected to tourism and souvenirs.” Instead the team created a subtle silhouette of tulip petals between the N and the L letterforms.The typeface used in ‘the Netherlands’ element of the logo is Nitti Grotesk, designed by the Dutch type foundry Bold Monday. “This idiosyncratic typeface has warmth and humanity. The long ascenders give this font its particular character, which works really well with the logo,” explains Dorresteijn. “For us [the logo] expresses simplicity, smartness and clarity,” he adds, and will be in use from January (in eight possible language variations).

Share

The exhibition, at the Crypt Gallery in Norwich, features the work of five design agencies – Spin, A Practice for Everyday Life, North, Muir McNeil and Graphic Thought Facility – that have each contributed a poster design for the show, as well as a piece of graphic design work that best illustrates each agency’s individual practice. The exhibition was organised by Andy Campbell of Norwich School.

Spin poster for Share

A Practice for Everyday Life poster for Share

North poster for Share

Muir McNeil poster for Share

Graphic Thought Facility poster for Share

Share is something of a rarity by placing graphic design in an exhibition format. While such shows do sometimes crop up at design-focused galleries, graphic design all too often only makes the walls of an exhibition space in the form of promotion or wayfinding. Campbell suggests that because graphic design is commonly set to a brief, it tends to remain framed within that context, rather than as a standalone piece of creative work.

However, he believes graphic design is worthy of an exhibition in how it slows it down and makes us look at the work with a different focus. “I think this is true of all the design-based subjects,” Campbell says. “Some work better than others in the exhibition format. [It] allows one to cherish the design of the work, in a way it takes the viewer closer to the creative part of the process, so they can take time looking at the use of colour, the feel and form of the typography, the format and the material, the things that the designers will have cared for and about.”

Kings Place Brand

Based in London’s Kings Cross, the space bills itself as the ‘cultural pulse’ of the area, hosting comedy, festivals, music performances and talks. To create its new identity, Studio Sutherl& delved into the “energy and variety” of its events. Working together with software engineer and digital artist Joe Pochciol, the studio built SoundWaveMachine – software that can analyse audio files and then generate new logos based on them.

Part of the aim of this approach was to bring together Kings Place’s sub brands, and the sound waves give each of these a common visual identity that still allows for some individuality.

Now, the branding for each event follows the same typeface – Champion Middleweight – but adopts its own unique pattern, based on music or sound from the performance.

Simmons & Simmons rebrand

The rebrand is designed to reflect Simmons & Simmons’ interest and investment in emerging technology, as well as attract keen young graduates that might otherwise be lured away by Silicon Valley. It’s an attempt to stand out from the sea of other law firms, who for years have relied on the same old branding to attract clients and employees.

“Law and lawyers are lagging well behind the rest of the world when it comes to branding, marketing and things like that,” SomeOne founder Simon Manchipp told CR. “They’ve always relied on really big brains attracting other big brains, but I think they’ve woken up and started to understand that brand is not just a logo, typeface and colour. It’s reputation, and the visual identity helps manage that reputation.”

FACEBOOK rebrand

Facebook has launched a new company brand of the same name (this time in capitals) to differentiate the company from the app, which will continue using its current logo and branding.

The new branding aims to make Facebook’s ownership of other apps and products – including Instagram, Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, Oculus and Portal – clearer to users. This follows a decision made in June to add the tagline ‘from Facebook’ within all of Facebook’s apps and services.

The new identity includes a capitalised wordmark in a bespoke typeface and an ever-changing colour palette that will adapt depending on the product it appears on. It was carried out by Facebook’s internal design team in collaboration with UK-based type foundry Dalton Maag and brand consultants Saffron.

Facebook’s design team said the rebrand was built on three “design behaviours”: ‘clarity’, ’empathy’ and ‘creating space’. The aim – according to the team – was to create a brand that “simplifies and builds understanding”, is “respectful of context and environment” in which it operates and creates space for sharing people’s stories.

With its use of capital letters, a custom font and rounded corners, the word mark is designed to make a clear distinction between company and app, which uses a lower case word mark in a bold sans font.

“We designed the new company wordmark with clarity and openness in mind. It’s built on a stable structure through the use of consistent stroke width, harmonised capital letters and a horizontal emphasis. The generous spacing and open letterforms allow clarity at small sizes, and the subtle softening of corners and diagonals adds a sense of optimism,” said the team.