Milk Packaging of Pasteur

lavanderzoom.jpgCheck out this fresh packaging for good old milk. Pasteur is a conceptual approach to a range of flavored milk. The design is clear, eye-catching and a different approach to traditional milk packaging.set.jpg“Branding project for a conceptual premium milk drink that would be sold in bars and restaurants. A healthy alternative to alcohol-based drinks. The product range features several flavours: whole milk infused with lavender, honey sweetened whole milk and coconut milk.”cover.jpg

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Typefaces of London

New type foundry launches with twelve fonts inspired by the capital, its buildings, language and traditions

Its first collection features fonts designed by the founders and a London Dingbat set by designer Peter Grundy. The set combines famous London landmarks, iconic designs and symbols with a set of London door numbers (added by Harpin).

Other fonts include London CircleLine, which Harpin says was inspired by the Post Office Double Line typeface designed by John Miles (who Harpin used to work for), the London Underground Roundel and Nancy Wyman’s designs for the Mexico Olympics in 1968.
London CircleLine by Paul Harpin
London Hoxton Square by Paul Harpin
London Fatface by Paul Harpin
London Modern by Paul Harpin
London Bloomsbury Old style by Paul & Patricia Hickson
London Belgravia Pro by Paul Hickson

SOS skincare for the woman who loves her skin

How beautiful is this branding?

“SOS is a new South Korean cosmetics brand that wants to help women with a daily skin care protection and routine. We created new branding for a set of makeup products that have premium quality for the luxury Asian market. The main features of this set are the skin masks for the healthy and perfect care of a woman’s daily treatment. 

With a clean look that is sophisticated and feminine, a color scheme of balanced and soft tones with gold bring a bit of luxury to the overall look without it being ostentatious. SOS is perfect for the women who love their skin and want to enhance their natural features.”

Cocoro Rooster

Cocoro Rooster is a chicken fast food restaurant that is guaranteed to make you smile. The mascot, an adorable, bug-eyed chicken, is fun and instantly recognizable, giving the brand a jolt of energy. Galilea Torres, the designer at Tropical Branding Lab behind the project, told us a bit more about creating Cocoro Rooster’s mascot, developing the bold design, creating something that would appeal to both kids and adults, and more.1.jpg1499817940495.jpeg1499818031712.jpeg

Rebrand for KIND Bars

“‘Do the KIND thing for your body, your taste buds and your world.’
This very ambitious mission statement wasn’t quite matching up with the products on the shelf.

A new logotype was created to more truly reflect the brand. Harsh grotesque all-caps characters were replaced with gentle curves and natural shapes.”

Photographer Giles Revell

In his new exhibition and book Cartographic Colour, photographer Giles Revell deconstructs flowers to reveal the beauty and the complexity of colour in nature. Working at Kew and the RHS Wisely garden, Revell photographed a selection of blooms which, using a grid placed over each image, he then set about analysing.In each square, Revell created graphic representations of the constituent colours of the flower concerned, revealing that what we might see as one strong colour, is often actually a combination of many. Cartographic Colour is divided in two. A series of ‘palettes’ reinterpret the colours of well-known flowers, abstracted to eliminate the distraction of form. Petals and stems are reduced to accurate graphic examinations of their constituent hues. “The plants were stripped of identity through the process of mapping, with the aim of creating a series of images where engagement is purely through scale, shape and position of colour,” Revell explains. “I was hoping to make arresting interpretations without the necessity of structure and form.”

Smoke free Britain

In the 1970s and 80s, artist and designer Biman Mullick distributed thousands of posters highlighting the harmful impacts of smoking and passive smoking. With his work featured in a new exhibition at the Wellcome Collection.

Anti-smoking poster by Biman Mullick / Cleanair. Images courtesy of the Wellcome CollectionIn the 1970s, Biman Mullick was teaching at an art school in England when he became concerned about the dangers of passive smoking. At the time, smoking indoors was commonplace and almost half (45%) of the UK’s adult population were cigarette smokers. Doctors had already established a link between smoking and lung cancer but little was known about the consequences of inhaling second-hand smoke.

Mullick was not a smoker but became concerned that if smoking was bad for you, then passive smoking might be too – so he created a set of posters asking students not to light up in his classrooms. He printed them out in black and white and put them up around the college but was quickly asked to remove them by the prinicipal. “There was no law against smoking in the classroom … and he said that smoking was a part of British culture,” says Mullick.

He sent his posters to newspapers and public health authorities, who immediately took notice. “Health operatives had started noticing that smoking should not be permitted in hospitals and health buildings, and they started buying my posters,” explains Mullick. Within a few years, his posters were in use throughout the country and by 1984, he had distributed 186,000 of them.

Most were distributed in hospitals, schools and colleges. They also appeared in the background in several TV shows.

Mullick’s designs are striking: the influence of Indian visual culture is evident in his work and his posters combine bold colours with hard-hitting phrases and playful illustrations. One reads ‘smoking is slow motion suicide’ and features an image of a deceased turtle with a cigarette in its mouth while another warns that ‘passive smoking kills’.

JKR rebrands The Diana Awards

JKR’s new branding for The Diana Award sees an uninspiring silhouette replaced with a 3D likeness of the Princess.

Its previous logo was an uninspiring – and not immediately identifiable – silhouette of Princess Diana. This has been replaced with a 3D likeness of the Princess created using photographs of her taken from different angles.

JKR worked with an illustrator to create the likeness after struggling to find a suitable photograph of Diana. The agency searched through hundreds of photographs (Diana was once the most photographed woman in the world) but found few that were taken side-on and decided to create an image instead.

The illustrator combined photographs to create a likeness of Diana’s head and shoulders. “We pieced it together from some photographs and used a little bit of artistic interpretation,” explains Sean Thomas, creative director at JKR.