Liberty rebrand

The luxury department store has unveiled new branding by Pentagram’s Harry Pearce that borrows cues from the historic sign that first hung over the door.

Liberty logo by Pentagram

The new logo puts the name of the store front and centre, dropping the reference to its London home and instead moving it to additional brand assets alongside a redesigned crest. The iconic deep purple hue remains intact across the packaging design, while the gold seen across the lettering has been “refined”.

Liberty logo evolution

The new branding draws upon Liberty’s lengthy history, in particular the original sign used at its Great Malborough Street location, though the historic link may appear subtle to casual onlookers thanks to the identity’s decidedly sleeker look.

The connection to the past is established in smaller details like the full-stop, which has been reinstated on the wordmark as per the original sign. Meanwhile, the angular serifs have been dropped from the logotype in favour of a new sans-serif typeface similarly rooted in the original design.

“The process of rebranding Liberty has been one of craft, archaeology and refinement,” says Pearce. “The logotype itself hails from the lettering in the original sign above the Great Marlborough Street front door, carefully redrawn to make it the most authentic logotype in Liberty’s history.”

Yale unlocks the sun

Founded in 1840, Yale began life as a New York-based manufacturer specialising in handmade bank locks. Today, it is one of the longest-running international businesses in the world, with million of Yale locks in use worldwide.

Yale’s refreshed visual identity includes a bespoke typeface by Jeremy Tankard and new UX, motion and sonic branding, all of which are centred around its distinctive sun-shaped logo. “We looked for something universal that would be understood around the globe. Yale already had a round yellow logo so that turned out to be a gift we could work from,” says GW+Co principal Gilmar Wendt.

“We landed on the sun as the core design idea because Yale is a warm and positive brand. You can rely on it always being there (even if you don’t see it) giving you peace of mind, and it is a big idea that is universally understood.”

The rebrand is currently rolling out internally, and will be seen externally later on in the year. For Wendt and the rest of the GW+Co team, the project has exemplified the challenges of rebranding a historic company like Yale for the digital era. “There is a need to create a future vision that builds on the past, rather than brushing it aside,” he says.

OneFootball

DesignStudio has created vibrant new branding for the football app, including an updated logo, a visual generator and a content strategy built around the idea of a ‘vibesmith’

“[OneFootball] needed a brand that adapted to Generation Z,” explains Vinay Mistry, design director at DesignStudio. “Generation Z is a generation of contrasts: they’re constantly adapting, they’re constantly changing, and football’s actually very similar. The rhythm of the game changes constantly as well. It made us think, actually there’s some lovely synergy there – can we define a personality for OneFootball that represents that?”

OneFootball identity by Design Studio

At the core of the project was the creation of a new logo. While researching the existing logo, the design team noticed its resemblance to the pictogramsdeveloped for the 1972 Olympic Games held in Munich, and also felt it was too similar to WhatsApp’s logo.

However, the team didn’t scrap the old logo altogether. Instead, they broke it down to its key parts – legs and football – and repurposed these elements into a new graphic forming a number one and a football in reference to the brand name. The new design is immediately more contemporary, partly because it does away with the gendered implications of the old logo.

OneFootball identity by Design Studio

Heinz new look

The identity covers all of Heinz’s products around the world, bringing them under the same visual umbrella. The redesign arrived on shelves earlier this year, and prominently features the brand’s ‘keystone’ symbol – so shaped for the Keystone State, Pennsylvania, where the company was founded.

JKR’s work makes good use of the mark, tapping into its familiarity, and using it as a playful framing device, with spaghetti hoops, saucy beans and plump tomatoes all interacting with it.

It’s accompanied by a pair of brand typefaces, Heinz Label – which has letterforms that mimic the Heinz logo – and Intro, which offers a range of styles including inline caps and script. A new colour palette includes the requisite Heinz Red, alongside green, yellow, blue and white.JKR Managing Director Jonny Spindler says the masterbrand celebrates Heinz’s “simple greatness”, and creates “brand unification” across the various parts of its business.

Branding an Olympic athlete

While gymnastics is Tulloch’s main focus, he is also keen to build a platform beyond competitive sport – whether through mentoring young athletes and working with youth groups or launching his own range of clothing and merchandise. For someone who grew up looking up to athletes like Cristiano Ronaldo, Roger Federer and Michael Jordan, success isn’t just about winning medals or standing on the podium – it’s also about using your platform to inspire and motivate others and having a wider cultural impact.

“It’s always been my dream and my goal to have a brand,” he tells CR. “I look at people like Ronaldo and Jordan and their brand and what they have … and they’re more than an athlete or a sportsperson,” he tells CR. “I love inspiring people, I’m into fashion, I’ve got a lot more that I want to do outside of gymnastics as well, so that’s something I’ve always wanted.”

Thanks to a collaboration with branding agency JKR, Tulloch now has his own visual identity, and a soon-to-be-released clothing range featuring upbeat phrases inspired by his attitude to sport. The identity launched earlier this year, and Tulloch hopes it will help him build his profile and reach a wider audience outside of gymnastics.

BECO Steal our staff

Having staff poached is typically a brand’s worst nightmare, yet toiletries brand Beco welcomed it with open arms in its provocative #StealOurStaff campaign.

The campaign was created by TBWA\London, which had already been working with Beco on getting its products stocked in leading retailers such as Boots, Waitrose and Sainsbury’s. The brand includes organic, paraben-free and plastic-free toiletries in its range, but it is the people that make Beco what it is. With 80% of its workforce disabled, disadvantaged or visually impaired, the social enterprise is gunning for change when it comes to the disability employment gap sustained by the biased hiring practices of many businesses. It’s a widespread issue that seems missing from wider discourse, which is what #StealOurStaff set out to change.

At the heart of the project’s concept was its packaging design, which features CVs of Beco employees. “It’s like an upside-down recruitment campaign,” TBWA\London chief creative officer Andy Jex says. The packaging takeover was joined by tweets sent to business leaders, a website-turned-recruitment portal that also contained advice for employers interested in hiring people with disabilities, and an accompanying spot on Channel 4. Made in collaboration with production company Hoi Polloi, the film stars real Beco employees contradicting the less-than-adequate audio description (AD) voiceover.

The film concept emerged from encounters with Beco staff working at the factory – particularly one team member who ridiculed Netflix’s questionable AD. It soon evolved into a tongue-in-cheek testament to the fact that people with disabilities are not short on humour. The aim was to be more lighthearted and less worthy, with the approach highlighting just how misleading media representations of disabled people can be – “particularly in advertising”, Jex notes.

Haarala Hamilton photography

Haarala Hamilton logo design by LanternAward-winning photographers Liz and Max Haarala Hamilton are well known for their portrait, food, travel and editorial creative. They have featured in various publications globally, including Huck Magazine, Boat Magazine, The Observer Magazine and Observer Food Monthly.

The simple branding system showcases Liz and Max’s greatest works across applications including business cards and portfolio brochures. Alongside photography, a suite of creative headlines play on the ‘Haa Ha’ wordmark, bringing life to conventionally mundane collateral including invoices and packing tape.

Haarala Hamilton brand marketing materialsHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton web design by Lantern

Created by Lantern

Createing a better future for every child

NCB approached Lantern to help redefine and articulate its mission both internally and externally. We delivered a strategic and creative toolkit, covering everything from a boilerplate summary statement, to a brand manifesto, a new set of values, a clearer process and of course a new identity – all designed to define the brand with clarity and conviction.

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Following a series of stakeholder workshops, they developed a new strategy to better articulate the charity’s point of difference. Their first step was to reframe the sense of unity within the organisation. Previously, ‘United for a better childhood’ meant being united internally, which wasn’t a compelling story for fundraising. Our research revealed NCB did far more than this – uniting central and local government, charities, schools, the media, and society as a whole. This meant they weren’t just impacting on the lives of individual children, but the lives of an entire nation.

The logo captures the very essence of ‘United for a better childhood’. A star, a jumping figure, an upwards arrow – the symbol provides a refreshed energy and sense of optimism.

NCB logo design process by LanternDesign of NCB app displayed on iPhoneNCB badge of Logo designed by Lantern

A bespoke, illustrated typeface builds on the concept of many elements uniting, whilst the illustration style provides the opportunity to communicate complex issues in a simple and intelligent way.Bespoke designed typeface for the National Children's Bureau

The new brand is flexible enough to appear playful and engaging, whilst also being able to communicate to government officials and policy makers. As well as flexing for different audiences, the brand system is designed to work for both print and digital applications.NCB supporting logo graphic

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Futr rebrand by Lantern

The identity revolves around Futr’s new winking face logo, which will also appear as the friendly avatar alongside messages exchanged with the company’s chatbots. Futr allows companies to have AI-powered conversations with customers – automatically answering queries where it can, and passing anything else onto a real person.

Lantern’s identity is intended to step away from the “abstract shapes and chat bubbles” that are found across the tech sector. According to the studio, the palette of yellow, pink and green is a deliberately optimistic choice, that helps set Futr apart from the “corporate teal” of its competitors. The sans serif font is Telegraf, from Pangram Pangram Foundry.

San Francisco Civic Music Association Brand

The San Francisco Civic Symphony wanted to grow as an organization and experiment with new genres, while fostering their legacy within San Francisco. We performed a brand audit leading to a full rebrand, messaging, and campaign to launch their new name and look at the 2018 Gala event. The rebrand injected creativity and imagination to represent the unique diversity of the organization. We paired modern letterforms in a non-linear sequence to represent notes on the scale. The new logo became the centerpiece for all collateral, helping to establish the brand in the community and build equity around the new identity.

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The results have attracted new participants, increased the number of musicians in the association and ultimately opened up more musical variety to a the San Francisco community.

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Find more here.