Tag Archives: Illustration

Competition

To mark the official start of summer I’m giving away a FREE design. Worth £50!
This can be anything from a wedding thank you card, baby announcement or an event invitation. Design can be A5 single sided or A6 double sided.
All you have to do is…
1. Like my facebook page
2. Share the Competition facebook post
3. Tag someone in the comments
Winner will be drawn at 4pm on 19th July.
Prize must be claimed before 31st December 2018. Please note that the prize does not include printing.
Good luck!
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Rice Brand Inspired By Floor Tiles

Milanese artisan rice brand RISO D’UOMO has revealed a new visual identity by Here Design. Cultivated from pure Carnaroli rice grown within sight of the historic Duomo di Milano, RISO D’UOMO’s refreshed design takes direct inspiration from the product’s place of origin, reflecting the ornate marble floor tiles of this impressive cathedral.

Using rich tones of navy blue and terracotta which are derived from the striking colour of the marble floors of the Duomo, the new brand identity adopts a timeless quality and strong design aesthetic, standing out on the shelf.Riso_Duomo_Here_-_Group_Shot_1.jpgRiso_Duomo_Here_-_Group_Shot_3.jpgRiso_Duomo_Here_-_Detail_2.jpg

Holiday Crackers

“Every year, Goods & Services agency creates a festive holiday gift for our clients; for 2016, our creative team decided to have some fun with holiday crackers.” 

“So we searched the globe to capture the most unusual ‘giving’ holiday creatures. Each cracker includes a story that is unique to its character. Tío De Nadal, a friendly log found in Spain, is beaten with a stick by children on Christmas eve until it poops out small presents. Yule Cat, a notorious feline native to Iceland, pounces and gobbles up farmhands who haven’t finished their winter’s work. Kallikantzaroi, a southeastern European goblin, creates mayhem during the 12 days of Christmas, by souring milk, terrorizing farm animals and generally being a nasty menace. The final character, Namahage, is a New Year’s ogre who storms into Japanese families’ homes and can only be placated by tasty treats.”CrackerPlate_Confetti_8559_EDIT.jpg

Astro Alphabet

AA_Package.jpg

Astro Alphabet, is a grow-with-you set of space-themed flashcards currently seeking funding on Kickstarter.

Lunar Saloon, creators of STARDECK, have developed a set of alphabet flashcards to be used by parents and children alike. Unlike traditional flashcards, AA is designed to be used beyond letter recognition, with pronunciation guides and facts accompanied by custom illustrations. The “grow-with-you” cards are designed for children aged 3-10.AA_Heat_Shield.jpgAA_Galaxy_Back.jpg

Work of Art For Your Kitchen

Inspired by Spanish floor tiles. Buenaventura designed the packaging for Cortijo Abades, a beautiful extra virgin olive oil.Cortijo-Abades-Aove-buenaventura-estudio.gifCortijo-Abades-Aove-buenaventura-estudio-03.jpg“The challenge was to be able to merge the ideas of tradition and origin with a modern and distinctive design which would eventually step away from the crowded mass. With the brand’s restyling and packaging design, we managed to level the consumer’s experience of tasting this impressive EVOO with experience of buying a unique and distinctive piece of art.”Cortijo-Abades-Aove-buenaventura-estudio-09.jpg

Cocoro Rooster

Cocoro Rooster is a chicken fast food restaurant that is guaranteed to make you smile. The mascot, an adorable, bug-eyed chicken, is fun and instantly recognizable, giving the brand a jolt of energy. Galilea Torres, the designer at Tropical Branding Lab behind the project, told us a bit more about creating Cocoro Rooster’s mascot, developing the bold design, creating something that would appeal to both kids and adults, and more.1.jpg1499817940495.jpeg1499818031712.jpeg

Smoke free Britain

In the 1970s and 80s, artist and designer Biman Mullick distributed thousands of posters highlighting the harmful impacts of smoking and passive smoking. With his work featured in a new exhibition at the Wellcome Collection.

Anti-smoking poster by Biman Mullick / Cleanair. Images courtesy of the Wellcome CollectionIn the 1970s, Biman Mullick was teaching at an art school in England when he became concerned about the dangers of passive smoking. At the time, smoking indoors was commonplace and almost half (45%) of the UK’s adult population were cigarette smokers. Doctors had already established a link between smoking and lung cancer but little was known about the consequences of inhaling second-hand smoke.

Mullick was not a smoker but became concerned that if smoking was bad for you, then passive smoking might be too – so he created a set of posters asking students not to light up in his classrooms. He printed them out in black and white and put them up around the college but was quickly asked to remove them by the prinicipal. “There was no law against smoking in the classroom … and he said that smoking was a part of British culture,” says Mullick.

He sent his posters to newspapers and public health authorities, who immediately took notice. “Health operatives had started noticing that smoking should not be permitted in hospitals and health buildings, and they started buying my posters,” explains Mullick. Within a few years, his posters were in use throughout the country and by 1984, he had distributed 186,000 of them.

Most were distributed in hospitals, schools and colleges. They also appeared in the background in several TV shows.

Mullick’s designs are striking: the influence of Indian visual culture is evident in his work and his posters combine bold colours with hard-hitting phrases and playful illustrations. One reads ‘smoking is slow motion suicide’ and features an image of a deceased turtle with a cigarette in its mouth while another warns that ‘passive smoking kills’.