Tag Archives: Illustration

Meet Alan

As part of a brand refresh for healthcare company Alan, DesignStudio has created a fluffy digital mascot that’s designed to make people feel good.

The company currently offers health insurance in France, but has plans to expand across Europe. According to DesignStudio, the updated identity is meant to convey a warmer and friendlier personality that will stand out in the healthcare marketplace.The end result is well executed and certainly feels unexpected, but there’s a question mark around whether it’s all just a little bit too warm and fuzzy.

Just over 8 weeks to Christmas Eve!

This year I’m bringing you 4 brand new Christmas cards designs. For only 60p each you can get any amount or combination. They’re only 75 cards of each design available, so get your while you can. Send me a message to get your today, postage is available but message for rate.

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Phoebe McCughley

“Basically, it’s 25 frames per second and it’s a very insane way of doing things, really,” says Phoebe McCaughley of her painstakingly crafted animations. Working with scraps of fabric and leftover packaging – which she uses to build her characters – McCaughley has found an innate talent for recreating natural movement. She’s also shown a deft hand for dealing with the big topics such as motherhood and mental health, which she manages to explore with an element of light-heartedness.

Not only is her work charming and relatable, it’s a reminder of just how enjoyable stop motion can be, when it’s done right.

Naomi Anderson-Subryan

Naomi Anderson-Subryan would spend a year trying to make it as an actor and another four years working in retail before realising that her calling was in the art world. After doing an art foundation at Camberwell College of Arts she decided to stay on to do a degree in illustration.

What is immediately clear from looking through the illustrator’s work is that she doesn’t take herself too seriously. Her ceramics experiments are brilliantly bonkers, in particular the three-part ‘play’ she created for her degree show, where characters including a ceramic piggy bank, Siamese cat and cowboy on horseback took to the stage.

Hollie Fuller

“I’ve loved to draw for as long as I can remember, so it makes sense that I ended up falling into illustration,” says Hollie Fuller. She started out studying fine art and photography at A-Level and delved into a bit of everything while on a foundation course before returning to her main love when she joined the Illustration course at Leeds Arts University.

Fuller’s pastel-hued illustrations have a knack of transforming everyday acts, such as using public transport, into scenes that are full of character, and have so far earned her commissions from the likes of art gallery The Hepworth Wakefield.

Masha Manapov’s

The Baku-born, Bristol-based illustrator’s ethereal scenes pull off the tricky feat of addressing serious issues such as climate change and suicide in a sensitive way, earning her commissions from the likes of Wired and The New York Times.

“I never wanted to stick to a very specific style because I believe that life, people and styles can be flexible and open to growth and change. I always enjoyed experimenting with different ideas and adjusting the style to the content of the piece,” says Manapov.

“I’m not sure if it’s a good thing or not but illustration for me has always been a tool and a medium, not the essence, and I did want to explore wider. I think that quite often I’m commissioned for the strange way my brain works, and not necessarily for my powerful lines or realistic execution.”

Oat-ly milk?

While oat milk’s popularity is just gaining momentum in the US, it got its start in Sweden back in the early 1990s. Rickard Öste, a food scientist at Lund University, researched options for a milk replacement that could provide a more sustainable solution and also be suitable for those with lactose intolerance. Essentially, he discovered a way to make the fibers of oats into a liquid, and shortly afterward he founded Oatly.

So why didn’t oat milk get added to cafe menus back in the 90s when it first became available? 

“Design-wise, it was sort of in the lactose intolerance category, so it wasn’t really considered food for everyone,” explained Lars Elfman, Design Director at Oatly. So when Toni Petersson was appointed CEO of Oatly in 2012—nearly two decades after the invention of oat milk—the first thing he did was hire one of the Creative Directors to turn the brand around.5268.jpgoatly-ice-cream-today-main-190620_3d1fb261dbf0c58d525e883825538d3f.jpgOatly-range-with-chilled-milk.jpg

The team certainly had their work cut out for them, after all, when they started they were an ad agency, not a design company. “I hadn’t made food packaging before,” confessed Lars. Still, they looked at the challenge as an opportunity to do something different—so different, in fact, that when they first approached Tetra Pak about printing the design they’d created, the packaging company initially said no. “They looked at it and were like, ‘You’re not going to be happy.’ They were worried about smearing and about some of the large dots becoming too big. So we bought a big roll of paper to have them do a test print first.”

The result? It came out perfectly. Lars said they’d done something no one else had done before, and that Tetra Pak had worked wonders with their packaging—although it was a good learning process for Oatly overall.

In going against the expectations of what food packaging should be (as well as what other brands gravitate towards), Lars and the team instead positioned Oatly as a handmade product. The brand’s packaging has a screen printed appearance with a more “scruffy background,” as he described it, making it feel like a custom crafted beverage and just another milk alternative.Slide-2-hello-future.8_2048x.png