Tag Archives: Illustration

Thierry Noir

Noir’s practice has a strong emphasis on line and aims to simplify forms to their most basic elements. This simplicity reflected the necessity of painting quickly outdoors in a hazardous environment with very real risks to his personal safety. Noir reacted to his environment and his monsters are a metaphor for the Wall itself, each one relating to his experiences or feelings of what he calls a ‘killing machine’.

Freedom Boulevard Mural

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Shapes, Hackney Wick

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The Acton Giant

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Sunset Boulevard

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Gary Mayes

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Sometimes described as a Renaissance man, Gary Mayes focuses his creative talents on animation and motion graphics, enabling him to maximise his skillset while satisfying his creative muse. Clients love working with him because he embraces a variety of approaches and ideas, never deploying a one-size-fits-all style or technique.

Check out the full animation here.

The Testaments

It’s been 35 years since the release of Margaret Atwood’s seminal tome The Handmaid’s Tale. Shortlisted for the 1986 Booker Prize, the novel paints a vivid picture of a modern day America that has been transformed into the totalitarian state of Gilead: a patriarchial, Puritan society where fertile women are forced to produce offspring for childless couples.

There is one central element of The Testaments’ plot that is alluded to with its distinctive cover design by Noma Bar: two of the book’s narrators are believed to be Offred’s daughters (the first of which was snatched from her and raised by a Commander family, while the younger girl was born during the course of her escape from Gilead).

Bar’s brief from the publisher was to create a contrasting image of the two sisters seen on the front and back covers, playing up to the fact that they are in wholly different situations, locations and circumstances. While the front cover bears a generic resemblance to his design for The Handmaid’s Tale cover, featuring the handmaids’ distinctive cloak and bonnet, the back cover depicts a girl that would be recognisable to most of us today, wearing earrings and her hair tied up.

“The main thing I wanted to do was to show the parallel worlds and lives of the two girls by reflecting and mirroring the sisters,” says Bar. “We chose the design as a double cover as I wanted to highlight the two characters’ presence – it’s not about one sister, it’s about two worlds.”

 

Meet Alan

As part of a brand refresh for healthcare company Alan, DesignStudio has created a fluffy digital mascot that’s designed to make people feel good.

The company currently offers health insurance in France, but has plans to expand across Europe. According to DesignStudio, the updated identity is meant to convey a warmer and friendlier personality that will stand out in the healthcare marketplace.The end result is well executed and certainly feels unexpected, but there’s a question mark around whether it’s all just a little bit too warm and fuzzy.

Phoebe McCughley

“Basically, it’s 25 frames per second and it’s a very insane way of doing things, really,” says Phoebe McCaughley of her painstakingly crafted animations. Working with scraps of fabric and leftover packaging – which she uses to build her characters – McCaughley has found an innate talent for recreating natural movement. She’s also shown a deft hand for dealing with the big topics such as motherhood and mental health, which she manages to explore with an element of light-heartedness.

Not only is her work charming and relatable, it’s a reminder of just how enjoyable stop motion can be, when it’s done right.

Naomi Anderson-Subryan

Naomi Anderson-Subryan would spend a year trying to make it as an actor and another four years working in retail before realising that her calling was in the art world. After doing an art foundation at Camberwell College of Arts she decided to stay on to do a degree in illustration.

What is immediately clear from looking through the illustrator’s work is that she doesn’t take herself too seriously. Her ceramics experiments are brilliantly bonkers, in particular the three-part ‘play’ she created for her degree show, where characters including a ceramic piggy bank, Siamese cat and cowboy on horseback took to the stage.

Hollie Fuller

“I’ve loved to draw for as long as I can remember, so it makes sense that I ended up falling into illustration,” says Hollie Fuller. She started out studying fine art and photography at A-Level and delved into a bit of everything while on a foundation course before returning to her main love when she joined the Illustration course at Leeds Arts University.

Fuller’s pastel-hued illustrations have a knack of transforming everyday acts, such as using public transport, into scenes that are full of character, and have so far earned her commissions from the likes of art gallery The Hepworth Wakefield.