Tag Archives: Illustration

Art of Play

“We collaborated with Art of Play, producers of some of the finest playing cards in the universe, to bring you one strange deck. These cards feature a completely custom design in typical Messymod fashion which can be described as minimal, modern, graphic, quirky, stylized, grotesque, delightful and just plain weird.

We designed this deck so that each card has its own presence and personality, making them ideal pieces of artwork that can stand on their own. Each card has patterns of suits within suits for endless fun.

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Packaged in a premium letterpress-printed tuck box both inside and out. Printed by the U.S. Playing Card Co. on Art of Play’s trademark thin-stock preferred by cardists.

Individual decks available on www.artofplay.com

A book a day

Oliver Jeffers announced he would be reading one of his books every day until people are able to leave their homes. Readings take place at 6pm UK time and are broadcast via Instagram Stories, meaning viewers in different time zones can tune in and watch any time within the following 24 hours. All broadcasts have been recorded and will also be added to Jeffers’ website.Image result for oliver jeffers

Mac Barnett – the author behind the Jack Book and KidSpy series – is also broadcasting live readings via Instagram at 12pm Pacific time, which are available to watch for 24 hours. In a post announcing the readings, Barnett said he had around a month’s worth of picture books – “and if we run out I might read some chapter books”, he wrote.Image result for Mac Barnett books

20 Wine bottles with a story

When we were asked to brand it and name it, it was that story-telling aspect of the wine that we wanted to bring to the surface. To do so, we decided to reinvent the bottle of wine so it could serve as a vessel for both a sophisticated liquid as well as for an engaging piece of literature. We named it Twenty Stories and created twenty unique labels with twenty unique stories, one for every year of LIDL in Greece.

The labels were printed on white, heavy, matte writing paper and were shredded on one side to give out the sensation of a real page that has been just ripped off a book. The front of each label has a free-hand illustration that hints the story in the back. The illustrative intention was to balance casual, everyday moments with their symbolic significance to a person’s life. The symbols were intensified by high contrast colors: Black and white for the book, red for the wine.

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Dan Reisinger

Dan Reisinger was born in Kanjiža, Yugoslavia, now Serbia in 1934. Much of his childhood was spent in hiding from the occupying Germans and having lost many family members in the Holocaust, including his father who died in a forced labour battalion of the Hungarian Army, in 1949 he and his mother immigrated to the nascent state of Israel.

Descended from four generations of painters and master-craftsmen, Reisinger soon found work as a housepainter. His sights, however, were set on acquiring a profession in the field of art and design. In 1950, former Bauhaus student Mordechai Ardon, Head of the New Bezalel School of Arts and Crafts, Jerusalem, accepted the eager 16 year-old into the school. Dan’s first poster for the national lottery was published in 1953, and a year later he won the Struck prize for the Bezalel’s most outstanding student.

Peace poster, 1968

Maccabiah Games poster, 1977

For 60 years, Reisinger’s memorable posters for the Habimah National Theatre, the Maccabiah Games, EL AL, the Israel Defence Force, and much more dominated Israel’s hoardings.

Poster for EL AL airlines, c. 1970

Poster for a performance of Julius Caesar, 1961

Always conscious of Bauhaus principles, Dan kept his work bold, straightforward and colourful. His three-dimensional and environmental designs were no exception. Israel’s Pavilion at Montreal’s Expo ’67, Tel Aviv’s seaside promenade, Bar Ilan university, medical schools, hospitals, buildings and industrial plants were given the brightly painted Reisinger treatment. His interactive calendars are masterpieces of paper engineering.

Poster for Israel Museum, 1976

Poster for the Post Office, 1965

Perpetual calendars for MoMA, 1987

VW waves goodbye to the Beetle

The spot, titled The Last Mile, is created by ad agency Johannes Leonardo and set to a version of Let It Be by The Beatles sung by a children’s choir. It is bathed in nostalgia for the Beetle, with references to its place in pop culture history included throughout.

It might seem odd for a brand to put so much emphasis on a product that is no longer available to buy, but the release of the ad forms part of an ongoing marketing push by VW to move on from the global diesel emissions scandal that severely damaged its reputation in 2015.

The new ad follows a previous campaign that aims to highlight its move into electric vehicles. As with The Last Mile, those ads also leverage the brand’s glorious past.

Electric vehicles are not mentioned explicitly in the Beetle spot though there is a lengthy scene that references environmentalism via wind power and the closing tagline – ‘Where one road ends, another begins’ – is an attempt to look to the future. The hope is clearly that the big love for Volkswagen that the world once had can be used to redeem its standing with consumers and allow both the brand – as well as its products – to move on from its difficult last few years.

Credits:
Agency: Johannes Leonardo
Production company: Nexus Studios
Director: Fx Goby

OKCupid

The dating app’s ads highlight the issues that matter most to its users – and tell us it’s OK to choose partners based on their political views.

OKCupid’s Ask Yourself campaign tackles the subject head on, with a series of ads that tell us it’s OK to select partners based on their political leanings, their attitudes towards gender or even their views on abortion. Outdoor posters feature lines such as ‘It’s OK not to date a man who won’t vote for a woman’ and ‘It’s OK to choose to only date someone who’s pro-choice’.

Featuring artwork by Xaviera López, it was created by Mekanism and follows Wieden+Kennedy’s witty DTF ads, which offered some surprising new takes on an acronym that has become ubiquitous on dating apps.

Thierry Noir

Noir’s practice has a strong emphasis on line and aims to simplify forms to their most basic elements. This simplicity reflected the necessity of painting quickly outdoors in a hazardous environment with very real risks to his personal safety. Noir reacted to his environment and his monsters are a metaphor for the Wall itself, each one relating to his experiences or feelings of what he calls a ‘killing machine’.

Freedom Boulevard Mural

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Shapes, Hackney Wick

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The Acton Giant

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Sunset Boulevard

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Gary Mayes

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Sometimes described as a Renaissance man, Gary Mayes focuses his creative talents on animation and motion graphics, enabling him to maximise his skillset while satisfying his creative muse. Clients love working with him because he embraces a variety of approaches and ideas, never deploying a one-size-fits-all style or technique.

Check out the full animation here.

The Testaments

It’s been 35 years since the release of Margaret Atwood’s seminal tome The Handmaid’s Tale. Shortlisted for the 1986 Booker Prize, the novel paints a vivid picture of a modern day America that has been transformed into the totalitarian state of Gilead: a patriarchial, Puritan society where fertile women are forced to produce offspring for childless couples.

There is one central element of The Testaments’ plot that is alluded to with its distinctive cover design by Noma Bar: two of the book’s narrators are believed to be Offred’s daughters (the first of which was snatched from her and raised by a Commander family, while the younger girl was born during the course of her escape from Gilead).

Bar’s brief from the publisher was to create a contrasting image of the two sisters seen on the front and back covers, playing up to the fact that they are in wholly different situations, locations and circumstances. While the front cover bears a generic resemblance to his design for The Handmaid’s Tale cover, featuring the handmaids’ distinctive cloak and bonnet, the back cover depicts a girl that would be recognisable to most of us today, wearing earrings and her hair tied up.

“The main thing I wanted to do was to show the parallel worlds and lives of the two girls by reflecting and mirroring the sisters,” says Bar. “We chose the design as a double cover as I wanted to highlight the two characters’ presence – it’s not about one sister, it’s about two worlds.”