Tag Archives: Photography

Haarala Hamilton photography

Haarala Hamilton logo design by LanternAward-winning photographers Liz and Max Haarala Hamilton are well known for their portrait, food, travel and editorial creative. They have featured in various publications globally, including Huck Magazine, Boat Magazine, The Observer Magazine and Observer Food Monthly.

The simple branding system showcases Liz and Max’s greatest works across applications including business cards and portfolio brochures. Alongside photography, a suite of creative headlines play on the ‘Haa Ha’ wordmark, bringing life to conventionally mundane collateral including invoices and packing tape.

Haarala Hamilton brand marketing materialsHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton web design by Lantern

Created by Lantern

San Francisco Civic Music Association Brand

The San Francisco Civic Symphony wanted to grow as an organization and experiment with new genres, while fostering their legacy within San Francisco. We performed a brand audit leading to a full rebrand, messaging, and campaign to launch their new name and look at the 2018 Gala event. The rebrand injected creativity and imagination to represent the unique diversity of the organization. We paired modern letterforms in a non-linear sequence to represent notes on the scale. The new logo became the centerpiece for all collateral, helping to establish the brand in the community and build equity around the new identity.

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The results have attracted new participants, increased the number of musicians in the association and ultimately opened up more musical variety to a the San Francisco community.

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Find more here.

Studio Dumbar remands Brugge’s

Local football clubs have also been working to raise the profile of women’s football and attract new players to the sport. This week, Club Brugge’s women’s team revealed a new name and a slick visual identity created by Studio Dumbar (part of design agency Dept) and independent art director Ludovic Beun.

The rebrand sees the club renamed as Club YLA in honour of Yvonne Lahousse, a Brugge local and diehard fan. “[Lahousse] died in 2006 at the age of 91. She was the ‘mother of the Spionkop’ – the part of the stadium with the most loyal supporters. Her fanaticism was legendary; mere days before giving birth she could still be found behind the goal to cheer on the team,” says Studio Dumbar.

The design aims to reflect Lahousse’s “dynamic, passionate and energetic” spirit, and will be applied to merchandise as well as outdoor ads and digital communications. With its bold black-and-white colour palette, angular typeface and striking photography by Stig de Block, it’s a fresh and contemporary look – one that feels closer to campaigns from the likes of Nike and Adidas than it does to traditional football branding.

The logotype is used alongside Klim Type Foundry’s typeface, Söhne Breit, in communications: “We specifically choose Söhne to contrast the hard-edged logotype and layouts and create more tension. It’s contemporary and functional with clear letter forms,” adds Enebeis.

Photography, meanwhile, aims to reflect the club’s “down to earth attitude” and urban location, while the colour palette reflects the team’s core colours of black, white and blue.

Lockdown postcards

Art Director Victoria Rosselli and Creative Robyn Frost are asking people around the world to share photos from out of their windows, in a bid to reframe how we see our homes under quarantine.

Images are then given a custom type treatment and repurposed as holiday postcards – something that, for many of us, are now a dim memory. So far the pair have received images from Edinburgh, Dubai and Honolulu which, with a bit of typographic help, have taken on a new lease of life.

It’s an uplifting project that reminds us that people around the world are all stuck in the same situation.

It’s also encouraging to see design being put to use to cheer us all up – and maybe even help us realise that however boring the view from our homes might seem, it still has its own unique charm.

Tweet your photo to @robynhfrost or @vctriarsslli to be part of the Greetings from Lockdown project

Can mouldy food sell food?

In a bid to emphasise its fresh food credentials, Burger King is showing the world exactly what happens when a Whopper is left to age for over a month.Moldy Burger King ad

Between the growing market for vegan, unprocessed or organic foods and the increased backlash in the face of the obesity crisis, it’s safe to say fast food chains are facing an uphill battle. While brands in this space have shown inventive responses to such quandaries, Burger King US has taken an unexpected punt at demonstrating its credentials as a producer of ‘real’ food. The move comes as the chain begins to remove preservatives from its recipes, apparently steering away from the additive-laden products most have come to expect from burger chains.

Built around the tagline ‘The beauty of no artificial preservatives’, the new campaign centres on a time lapse that begins with a meticulously assembled Whopper burger, staged M&S-style against a dramatic black backdrop. Before long, however, we see what happens to the burger as the days and weeks go by – insert mould, fluff and all manners of scuzz – to the tune of Aretha Franklin’s What A Difference A Day Makes.

The accompanying print ads follow a similar format, capturing the state of the Whopper on different days late into the decomposing process. The campaign was the creation of three agencies – David Miami, Publicis, and INGO Stockholm.

An image of a moldy burgerAn image from Burger King's new ad campaign

LSO Campaign

Superunion has been working with LSO since 2017, when it launched a new brand identity for the orchestra inspired by the movement of conductor Sir Simon Rattle’s baton. Previous campaigns have featured CG artwork based on Rattle’s hand gestures, but for LSO’s 2020/21 season, Superunion opted for a different approach, teaming up with Found Studio and dancer Ella Robson Guilfoyle to create a dramatic live-action dance film.

The campaign takes inspiration from the theme of LSO’s upcoming programme, ‘Dancing on the edge of a volcano’, which will see the orchestra perform work created in Europe in the first half of the 20th century. According to Rattle, the phrase was used by Austrian composer Alban Berg to describe the atmosphere in 1930s Germany and captures the mood of an era that produced “some of the darkest music possible”.

For the first shoot, Superunion filmed Robson Guilfoyle performing a series of short dance sequences based on Rattle’s movements (which were recorded using motion capture) while wearing colourful clothing. Footage was captured from above at 50 frames per second using 5K cameras. Guilfoyle then performed a series of movements with flares, sparkles, smoke grenades and chalk dust, which was filmed at 100 frames per second.

Teach First rebrand

The charity has ditched its “corporate” identity in favour of an all-encompassing rebrand that reflects its mission to create fair education for all.

The update was almost two years in the making, and required Teach First to “take a hard look at their brand”, says Johnson Banks. The charity wanted to move away from its previous style and embrace something bolder that would reflect its focus on tackling inequality and helping children reach their potential, while also conveying a “grittier, more direct tone of voice”.

The studio says the refreshed identity also needed communicate with a “bewildering array” of people, from graduates, teachers and headmasters to people considering changing career as well as government departments and corporate sponsors.

Jake Newbury

Jake Newbury’s interests are broad, though it’s clear he’s naturally inclined towards underground scenes. Having recently graduated from the Design for Publishing course at Norwich University of the Arts – where he specialised in editorial design and illustration – the designer has created eye-catching spreads based on streetwear brands like Carhartt WIP and Stone Island, as well as experimental producer Aphex Twin.

Newbury’s penchant for distressed visuals comes through in these projects, but his wider portfolio demonstrates an eye for sleeker styles.