Category Archives: VisCom

Take away your takeaway

Takeaway packaging is the third largest source of littering in cities across the world, according to recent research by the University of Cádiz in Spain.

As Norway’s largest takeaway restaurant chain, McDonald’s is a substantial part of the problem in Norwegian cities – and it doesn’t help that its iconic golden arches make its packaging very noticeable. But in a new campaign led by Nord DDB, the fast food chain is taking ownership of this role.

Leading with the message ‘take away your take away’, the campaign is all about showcasing the ugly side of McDonald’s packaging and encouraging fast food lovers to help the brand reduce littering.

Photos of McDonald’s trash lying around in the streets of Oslo have been artfully captured by photographer Jói Kjartans for print, social media, OOH displays and McDonald’s trays in order to reach as many customers as possible.

Trash cans have been placed next to OOH displays so that the golden arches can be used as a trash-guide, and the campaign also includes a commercial shown on TV and online. As for the longer term, the brand has initiated several measures to create long-term solutions.

Director Daniel Kwan releases a kid book with A24

After breaking into the world of book publishing several years ago, film production company A24 is expanding its focus to younger audiences. Earlier this year, it released its first children’s book project – a reprint of Star Child by Claire A Nivola, which, in a clever ploy, was quoted in another A24 enterprise, Mike Mills’ 2021 film, C’mon C’mon.

One of Kwan’s new books is called I’ll Get to the Bottom of This, beautifully illustrated by Sean Lewis. The story follows a dog detective investigating a car pile-up that leaves all of the characters (also dogs, which may explain the traffic accident) trapped in a tunnel. While everyone tries to work together to find a way out, the detective is more preoccupied with finding someone to blame.

The investigations take an even more obscure turn as his line of questioning extends to the main suspect’s organs, before he’s challenged to think beyond himself by a higher cosmic power.

A playful visual identity for plant-based milk brand KiddiWinks

The 100% plant-based milk reimagines a childhood staple with a formula comprising oat, chickpeas and chicory root, providing eight grams of plant-based protein and more than six grams of fibre.

Ahead of KiddiWinks’ launch in the US (it will roll out to other markets in the coming months), the team brought in New York-based Young Jerks to develop its branding and London creative agency Wildish & Co to lead on its website design.

The agencies started by asking themselves, what would a plant-based milk brand for kids look like? “KiddiWinks is a really interesting brand as it hits the intersection of sustainability and health, both key decision drivers in purchase decisions – especially for parents,” says Wildish & Co managing director, Sam Fresco.

Young Jerks opted for an illustration-led visual identity, which is full of youthful personality but also stylish enough for grownups. At its heart is a “gloopy and milky” hand-drawn logotype, says senior art director Kelly Thorn. Supporting fonts include Caspar by Flavor Type and Visby Round by Connary Fagen as the body copy, chosen thanks to its “soft serve” feel, she adds.

Ragged Edge rebrands Gaia, a startup offering the world’s first IVF insurance

Offering the world’s first IVF insurance, Gaia was created after its founder, Nader AlSalim, had a firsthand experience of what is a complex and expensive procedure. He was inspired to find a way of helping other families access IVF without succumbing to the financial hurdles that often make it impossible or unsustainable in the long-term.

Ragged Edge’s refreshed branding for Gaia counters these depictions, instead offering an inclusive, welcoming picture of the modern family, as well as a more empathetic and realistic understanding of the IVF journey. Using simple yet effective collaging techniques, it shows the many experiences one can go through during this process, as well as the different kinds of people that choose to use IVF.

This diversity is further embraced through Gaia’s new wordmark, which features both an uppercase and lowercase ‘a’ to represent the fact that no two families are the same. Meanwhile, an inspiring yet grounded colour palette aims to capture the difficulties of going through an IVF journey without compromising the optimism needed along the way.

As a whole, Gaia’s new identity is empathetic yet realistic. Unlike other organisations within the fertility industry, it does not shy away from the fact that the success of IVF is never guaranteed, and the process itself may not be an easy one. But nor does it make the treatment feel out of reach. Instead, it presents IVF as something that everyone should have access to, no matter their financial situation or the makeup of their family.

Magazine covers of the year 2022

Time, The Resilience of Ukraine

Valeriia also provided the inspiration for Time’s first cover addressing the war, created by JR – an artist known for his large-scale activist works. A drone was used to capture the powerful final cover image, which illustrates how a 45-metre tarp print of Valeriia’s photograph was unfurled and hoisted by more than 100 people outside Lviv’s National Opera.

New York, Who Becomes a “Murderer” in Post-Roe America?

The New York Times Magazine, The New York Issue

FT Weekend Magazine, Queen Elizabeth II 1926 – 2022

The world’s media was full of tributes to mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II in September. British Vogue paid its respects with a royal purple cover, free from any other adornment, which it had previously published to commemorate the loss of George V and George VI. For its weekend magazine supplement, the Financial Times commissioned Estonian illustrator Eiko Ojala to create a beautifully crafted memorial cover. The cut-out inspired design depicts the monarch through different periods of her life, repurposing the portrait that became synonymous with the longest-reigning monarch in British history.

New look for Wok to Walk

Wok to Walk began life in 2004 as a tiny restaurant in Amsterdam, inspired by the founders’ travels around Asia. Fast forward to today, and it’s a global food brand with over 100 sites in 20 countries.

Inspired by this ancient form of cooking, the new logo features a wok with a lightning bolt in the middle, which doubles as a signature W. Building on the dynamic mark, Without created a suite of patterns that sit across uniforms, takeaway bags and typographic posters.

A refreshed colour palette introduces new gradients inspired by the cinematography of Hong Kong director Wong Kar Wai. Meanwhile, a new photography style and art direction seek to translate the colours, flavours and emotion of Chinese street food, instead of falling back on tired clichés.

The brand’s renewed emphasis on copywriting also focuses on food quality, seasonal recipes and ingredients, rather than price or meal deals. In this vein, the chefs – who attend circus school as part of their training – have been renamed as Woksmiths to highlight their cooking credentials.

Christmas Ad 2022

Credits:
Agency: The&Partnership
Chief Creative Officer: Micky Tudor
ECD: Toby Allen
Creative Directors: Chris Clarke, Matthew Moreland
Production Company: MJZ
Director: Gary Freedman
DOP: Stéphane Fontaine

Credits:
Agency: adam&eveDDB
CCO: Richard Brim
Creatives: Edward Usher, Xander Hart, Richard McGrann, Andy Clough
Creative Directors: Matt Gay, Feargal Ballance
Design: King Henry
Designer: Dave Robinson
Head of Motion Graphics: Ed Christie
Motion Designer: Curtis Reeves
Production Company: Biscuit Filmworks UK
DOP: Daniel Landin
Production Designer: Jon Henson
VFX: nineteentwenty

Credits:
Creative Agency: Bartle Bogle Hegarty London
Lead Creative Team: Marc Rayson, Callum Prior
BBH Dublin Xreatives: Sam Caren, Aubrey O’Connell
Creative Directors: Christine Turner, Kevin Masters
Studio Leads: Andy Cooke, Anthony Jones, Rob Wilson
Creative Producer: Julian Cave
Global Chief Creative Officer: Alex Grieve
Production Company: MJZ
Director: Fredrik Bond

Credits:
Creative Agency: Accenture Song
Creative Lead: Victoria Foster
Design Lead: Michael Hirst
Chief Creative Officer: Nik Studzinski
Creative Directors: Luke Ramm, Joe Holt, Robert Amstell, Matthew Lancod
Production Company: Hungry Man
Director: David Kerr
DoP: Simon Chaudoir
AD: Phil Booth
Production Designer: Jacqueline Abrahams
Post Production: Rascal Post
ECD/VFS Supervisor/2D Lead Compositor: Andrew ’Barnsley’ Wood

Credits:
Creative Agency: Lucky Generals
Head of Global Creative: Jo Shoesmith
Director: Taika Waititi
Production Company: Hungry Man
DOP: Mike Berlucchi
VFX: Guillaume Weiss

Credits:
Agency: TBWA\Media Arts Lab
Director: Juan Cabral
Production Company: MJZ

Sainsbury’s festive fairytale ad

Credits:
Agency: Wieden + Kennedy London
Creative Directors: Freddy Taylor & Philippa Beaumont, Juan Sevilla & Joe de Souza
Executive Creative Director: Susan Hoffman
Agency Artworker: David Brodie
Design Directors: Phil Rosier, Alex Thursby-Pelham
Designer: Emma Cope
Production Company: Anonymous Content
Director: Tim Godsall
Editorial Company: Final Cut
VFX Company: Time Based Arts