Category Archives: VisCom

Fuse coffee

Fuse coffee’s branding system utilizes red, blue, and black dots to create it’s identity system. These dots overlap and meld together, bringing a playful element to the name “FUSE.” The branding exercise proves that the design is unique, playful, and innovative. Fuse your morning with this coffee for a day that is sure to be a success. Editorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

Love Wellness redesign

So Bosworth decided to consult the experts and invent a better approach—and in 2016 she launched Love Wellness, a line of curated body-positive health products for women.

The brand has had a couple different identities over the years, but hit its stride with its latest look, created by Lobster Phone and released this spring.

The San Francisco–based design firm delivered a new identity, website, packaging and creative strategy.

As Lobster Phone writes, “Inspiration for the logo was found in a late 1930s Art Deco type specimen; it felt playful, chunky and expressive. We used this as the basis for creating custom letterforms that are both clear and iconic. As illustrations are foundational to the larger brand, we made the ‘V’ of the logo into a face with lips that kiss and talk. Each product has its own quirky name, corresponding illustration and color combination that provide a not-so off-the-shelf look. The illustrations play off the style of the logo’s lips—an almost Japanese pop aesthetic—clearly demonstrating the benefits of the product in a dynamic way.”

Love_GoodToGlow.jpgLove_PackagingLineup.jpgLove_BizCards.jpgLove_WildPosting.jpg

THC PHYX

Editorial photographEditorial photographPHYX’s branding and visual identity, developed with help from agency FuseboxWest, are designed to appeal to the modern cannabis consumer who is more interested in cannabis’ effect on wellness, with a contemporary and luxe bottle design that is stylish and shows little sign of it being an infused drink. This gives the impression that Phyx is a premium bottled water.Editorial photographEditorial photograph

“VOSS bottles have a distinctive shape with brand equity that consumers associate with higher quality than traditional water bottles,” says Dan Gardenswartz, Chief Financial Officer of Spherex. “By choosing a similar shape and look, we wanted to leverage the feelings of quality already associated with VOSS to show the consumer this product is different.”

“The product design is more similar to wellness-focused CPG than typical cannabis fare,” Dan adds. “We wanted the packaging to be unlike any other product a consumer would see in a cannabis dispensary. Whether it is just a single bottle or [it’s] one of our four-pack boxes, when PHYX is standing next to other cannabis-infused beverages, it stands out.”Editorial photograph

Midol redesign

In 1938, Bayer began to market the over-the-counter medication for relieving period discomfort, and Midol’s brand identity evolved along with women’s place in society. In recent years, however, the brand surmised that women were well aware of their products; it leads sales in its category, but after further analysis, they found that consumers didn’t know Midol’s values, nor could they recall the color of their packaging.

So, they knew it was time for a brand refresh.

Martha Seidner, design manager at Bayer’s American Pain and Cardio business, told Adweek that that research validated the decision to go ahead with a redesign.Editorial photograph

The new look, crafted with help from design agency GoDutch and advertising shop Oliver, breathes modernity into the brand, ditching the old monochromatic approach with something bolder. A bright, yellow background ties together the Midol range of products, with a different saturated hue for each formulation. The new wordmark does away with serifs and both standout while also reflecting strength, something intended to be more reflective and appeal to millennials and Gen Z women.

Midol’s brand refresh comes as millennials approach and reaches its peak purchasing influence with Gen Z not far behind, bringing along different and evolving attitudes towards womanhood and women’s health.

Raissa Pardini typographical face to music

Raissa Pardini always knew what she wanted to be when she was little – but perhaps more importantly, she always knew what she didn’t want to be. “I wanted to produce art but I didn’t want to be an artist, and that’s when I realised that design could give me all the art I needed in my life without [becoming] an artist.”

These projects have become her playground for bending conventions and pushing the envelope as much as she can within the confines of the brief. “I like playing with rules. I love having to deal with letters, spacing, colours, messages, briefs. It’s challenging to me,” she says. While “an artist creates their own rules”, she feels she’s better at breaking pre-existing ones.

For Pardini’s own line of work, she enjoys playing with this dynamic. “Pushing my creativity to the limit of legibility but at the same time don’t over kill it as the message needs to be delivered – that’s my favourite challenge,” she says. Pardini has applied this approach to a range of designs for music gigs, tours and other events, working across posters and music videos for bands such as Snapped Ankles, Pond, Houseplants, Awesome Tapes from Africa, and hit band Idles. “Those are all graphical compositions made out of only letters and colours,” she says. “I want to push the typography until letters becoming the real artwork feature.”

Working predominantly in tandem with the music industry can pose challenges. “The music industry can be tricky, and working with other artists (and their managers) can be really awkward at times. I feel lucky to be approached to work with someone because of my own style, and bands usually trust me to deliver the best piece of work I think would suit them. But it isn’t always like that and it can get frustrating,” she says.

Pentagram rebrand Jane Austen

According to Pentagram, the rebrand was a chance to avoid the “now-cliched iconography” that’s often associated with the writer.

A capital A, found in one of Austen’s handwritten letters, formed the basis for the museum’s new wordmark, while a secondary logo echoes the distinctive 12-sided desk the author sat at to write.

The colour palette is based on original wallpaper samples from the home, and Pentagram chose a pair of typefaces for the identity – Caslons Egyptian, which was released in 1816, and Caslon Doric, designed by Commercial Type.

Cadbury rebrand

In its newly unveiled brand identity, the company attempts to tread the fine line between heritage and modernity, retaining its signature purple hue but introducing a redrawn wordmark, new iconography and a fresh approach to typography.

Created by design agency Bulletproof, the refreshed Cadbury wordmark is a contemporary take on the signature of the company’s founder, John Cadbury.

Meanwhile, the agency reimagined the Dairy Milk Glass and a Half logo so that it links directly with the brand’s chocolate chunk symbol, and developed a new pattern for the chocolate based on its original packaging from 1905.Nick Rees, global creative director at Bulletproof, says: “We wanted to recapture the very spirit of Cadbury, so part of the research process involved digging into the Cadbury archives to reinterpret its iconic visual cues to create a modern and playful identity that still has a clear recognition for consumers.”The new brand identity was kicking off in Australia in May, followed by South Africa and Malaysia later in the year, and will be rolled out to other markets including the UK and Ireland at the beginning of 2021.

Pier 70 new identity

dn&co delved into Pier 70’s industrial past to create the new identity, which references the 50-foot steel frame that’s been turned into a new gateway for the area. The architecture also informs a series of linear patterns that cut through posters and adverts. According to the studio, the tagline, Made of San Francisco, is an effort to root the area in the heart of the community, after dn&co interviewed locals and found that many feel the city is losing its soul.

Brand colours reference the story of the pier as well as its surroundings, using bright orange, blue and pink alongside greys and browns that nod to Pier 70’s history. It takes Druk as its display typeface, using its solid letterforms as another reference to the area’s industrial heritage.

Liberty new identity

Founded in 1934 in response to police attempts to stop peaceful protests during the Hunger Marches. While Liberty’s values have remained the same throughout its history, its branding had become dated over the years, and the organisation brought in design studio North to reimagine its visual identity for today’s landscape.

The double L and I character in the new logotype is intended to be a “rallying cry” to its membership base, says North, adding: “Our civil rights are dependent on the effort of individuals, and so challenge us to be responsible. The special L and I character expresses the dichotomy between the organisation and the individual.”

Bureau Grot was chosen as the main font family for its “bold” appearance and “approachable quality”, says North, while the core colour palette eschews politically charged colours such as red and blue for green, and was inspired by the coloured hankerchiefs of the Argentinian women’s rights and pro-choice movement Pañuelazo.liberty's new logo represents ordinary people standing up to power, designed by north

The studio also worked on a brand campagin to go with the visual identity, which uses the logotype to highlight some of the key cases Liberty has worked on over the years, which have ranged from fighting fascism to exposing the dark side of mass surveillance.

liberty's new logo represents ordinary people standing up to power, designed by north designboom