All posts by batchelorl

Having grown up and lived in Belfast all my life, I graduated as a Graphic Designer in 2015. I have a love for all things typography, branding, adverting and print design. I love solving all kinds of briefs big or small. During my studies I worked with a creative team in Belfast gaining valuable industry experience.

Skincare Yepoda focuses on clean rebrand

Kepoda’s skincare packaging, designed by OWLSOME STUDIO, introduces consumers to the ingredients inspired by accessible skincare. The packaging is simple, focusing on a clean and sophisticated design, highlighting a vertical logo that brings the user’s eye from top to bottom. Additionally, the color palette across the line is refreshing yet playful.

Over Easy

Over Easy is launching into the breakfast category with a line of simple, nutritious, and better-for-you breakfast bars in four morning-inspired flavors – Apple Cinnamon, Banana Nut, Peanut Butter, and Vanilla Matcha – with a bold, colorful look and message to match.

CNET’s new identity

Since launching in 1994, US media brand CNET (an abbreviation of Computer Network) has become a trusted source for reporting and advice on all things related to technology and digital culture.

As tech has evolved over the last two decades to influence almost every aspect our lives, the media company decided to expand its coverage and advice to what matters most in modern life – including money, home, wellness, culture and climate.

Collins’ brief was to turn CNET from a tech review site into an editorial-first brand known for its useful information and expertise, putting it alongside the raft of other news organisations that are placing renewed emphasis on trust, including the New York Times and the Guardian.

The new visual identity swaps the lower case sans serif logo that CNET had used for the past 30 years in favour of a more trim, custom serif wordmark inspired by editorial design from the so-called golden era of journalism.

In marketing CNET’s new approach, the studio leaned into bold surrealism with a series of striking artworks by Kentucky-based illustrator Robert Beatty. It has also introduced a slab serif typeface, Sentinel, and a new brand voice that seeks to make talking about the news more enjoyable.

ARC branding

ARC is a real estate partner geared towards organisations and institutions specialising in science and innovation. These companies are brought together in place-based groups, or Advanced Research Clusters, positioned in and around cities like London and Oxford.

To help put a new spin on the category, dn&co worked across ARC’s brand strategy, narrative, positioning, identity, and the name itself. The visual identity centres on the ‘cluster’ concept and draws on mathematical graph theory to represent people, places and relationships.

The individual radial symbols might have gaps, but when layered they form a perfect ring, which “represents the assembled strength” of the different campuses within a network, says creative director Patrick Eley. It is complemented by chunky, condensed typography designed to “reflect the power of the cluster ecosystem”.

B&Q poster campaign

Shot by photographer James Day, who is known for his work for the New York Times, New Yorker and Wallpaper, the new B&Q ads are simple yet beautiful.

Each features a mobile phone with a B&Q product bursting from it, including paint, a roll of wallpaper and a bloom of flowers. The only text accompanying this is the brand’s web address, which alongside the image of the phone is enough to send home the message that you can order all these products digitally.

McDonalds BIN IT

This campaign is Belgium’s take on the theme, created by TBWA, which puts bins centre stage. “We want to make trash bins as popular as the burgers,” says Jeremie Goldwasser, creative director at TBWA.

The campaign, which will run on posters, social and in McDonald’s restaurants across Belgium, puts the spotlight on rubbish bins, bathing them in light and pairing them with witty copy.

“We asked Studio Wauters – McDonald’s’ permanent food photographer – to photograph the trash bins,” continues Goldwasser. “The challenge? Making bins look just as attractive and tempting as their burgers. We then applied the typical copywriting and design expertise to the bins, resulting in appetising design and quirky names such as the Big Bin, the Bin Deluxe and the Bin Royal.”

JKR redesigns Magnolia Bakery

First set up on Bleeker Street in New York’s West Village in 1996, Magnolia Bakery played a significant role in the boom in popularity for cupcakes in the 90s, which has endured pretty much ever since.

After experiencing a pop culture moment when Carrie and Miranda were shown chatting about their love lives over cupcakes from the store in season three of Sex in the City, the brand has expanded to other sites across the city, and the world, and now plans further growth as well as giving greater focus to its direct-to-consumer business.

To mark these developments, JKR has created a new brand identity, which draws on Magnolia Bakery’s original, somewhat whimsical styling though refines it for more coherence, especially in digital.

“The new logo is inspired by the bakeshop’s trademarked cupcake swirl – which takes up to 40 hours to perfect! – and the live theatre of the bakery; mixers spinning vanilla cake batter, cupcakes being iced and banana pudding being scooped.” says JB Hartford, group creative director at JKR.

The updated core brand colour is inspired by the iconic green of the bakery’s walls, while other colours are drawn from its desserts and colourful sprinkles. 

The brand’s West Village roots are still firmly evident in illustrations, though the wider system allows the brand to grow across different channels, particularly digital. Magnolia Bakery will roll out the new design elements over the coming months, beginning with its digital platforms, followed up by packaging and store refreshes. The brand will also continue to add new products to the D2C channel in the coming months.

Viva water feel more like a treat

Viva Mineral Water’s packaging represents the distinct past of the resource of the beverage. Each bottle showcases the “four elements of nature” through a beautifully etched pattern on the glass bottle. Created by Prompt Design, the water’s packaging is sleek and refined, adding an element of surprise to a drink we know is vital to our lives.

Our design intention is to present the distinctiveness of mineral water resource through the “four elements of nature” concept by depicting the symbolic expression the “four elements of nature” as different patterns on the bottle surface. The embossing helps enhance the attractiveness and water purity reflection of the bottle as well as its luxury, high class and uniqueness in design.

Everyone loves Chocolate

Chocolate is a truly miraculous thing. The indulgent treat made from cocoa pods becomes a delicious food when mixed with other ingredients, such as sugar, fruit, or nuts. Unfortunately, most chocolate bars are made with refined sugars and stick to conventional ingredients.

Spring & Mulberry is a chocolate brand founded by Kathryn Shah and Sarah Bell to share more complex flavors beyond sweet, adding organic fruit, pollens, nuts, and spices, all sweetened with dates, a purportedly healthier alternative to refined sugars. Spring & Mulberry also uses organic ingredients whenever possible, and the bars are vegan save for lavender, bee pollen, and rose petal since it contains animal-derived pollen.

“The brief was to take the client’s product— date-sweetened chocolate—and build a brand supporting the concept of ‘exploring a world of sweet beyond sugar,’” said Allison Henry Aver, owner and creative director at Letter A, the agency behind Spring & Mulberry’s packaging. “We created the ‘land of Spring & Mulberry,’ where food and friends and feasts are abundant, good looking, and good-for-you. The land is showered in dappled light and dreamy sunsets, and from this, we took inspiration for our color palette, packaging, prints, and photography.”

The design is elegant, with fanciful and striking typography. The logo also makes tasteful use of Meek Display, with Brick DisplayClifton, and Nexus playing supporting roles. The mix of varying widths, round, and sharp edges shows complexity and craftwork, signaling a premium experience and product.

Baskin-Robbins

Baskin-Robbins has had a bit of an identity crisis the last few years. They’re still all about the ice cream they scoop up, ice cream cakes, sundaes, and shakes, but Baskin Robbins’ logo and branding haven’t delighted as much as its sweet, frozen treats. At the end of 2020, Baskin-Robbins introduced a new visual identity, replacing its maligned logo with a JKR-designed look, a definite step forward and inspired by “Living Flavorfully.”

Now, Baskin-Robbins has unveiled another logo and visual identity system, this time by creative agency ChangeUp (though, according to Baskin-Robbins, it hasn’t undergone a “major” brand refresh in decades). Time flies, supposedly, and recent events have likely distorted our perception of its passing, but the early 2021 refresh also included a new logo, visual system, and bespoke typeface.

“Baskin-Robbins is one of those brands with the unique potential to transcend generations. They wanted the branding to deliver the quality and creativity they’ve always offered but weren’t getting credit for,” explained Ryan Brazelton, ChangeUp CCO. “They needed to create a visual identity system that was exciting for people who grew up with them and future audiences as well.”

The new Baskin-Robbins logo turns to the brand’s visual history as inspiration for the new design. The brown and pink color combination is back, which sounds as gross as chocolate orange mayonnaise, but it works. The new logo keeps the oh-so-clever “31,” first introduced in 2006’s logo ( and held over in 2021). The type has a bit of the original’s circus feel, and the perfect circle shapes also recall the logo first introduced in 1947. Secondary typography is much more subdued in this refresh. Gone are the sharp angles, and the new type is less child-like and more mature, adding some soft lines that keep the new visual presentation casual and comfortable.