All posts by batchelorl

Having grown up and lived in Belfast all my life, I graduated as a Graphic Designer in 2015. I have a love for all things typography, branding, adverting and print design. I love solving all kinds of briefs big or small. During my studies I worked with a creative team in Belfast gaining valuable industry experience.

Sephora power of beauty

French beauty chain Sephora has launched a new campaign called The Unlimited Power of Beauty, which signifies a shift in its brand positioning. “The Unlimited Power of Beauty is a new, powerful campaign that is deliberately different from previous years,” explains Olivier Vigneaux, the CEO for BETC Digital. “It is both universal in its casting and intimate in its tone and imagery, allowing viewers to see themselves in the story and discover the potential of their own beauty.”

The three-minute ad, directed by German creative Jonas Lindstroem, tells the story of a woman’s relationship with her reflection throughout her life. Tender and intimate, we follow the lead character from childhood to adulthood and are taken through relatable moments of both doubt and strength.

From experimenting with vivid makeup as a young girl to using it as an adult as a confidence boost after a hard day, the ad aims to highlight how the same person can explore the many facets of beauty in a lifetime, and even in just one day.

The campaign signifies a more grounded approach to the way we use makeup and beauty products, taking us away from the more theatrical. It acknowledges the ways in which beauty has evolved, going beyond catwalks and magazines, and how it can now be presented to us through friends’ selfies or uploads from influencers.

 

Making something beautiful out of Covid 19

Editorial photographInstead of a wall of red dots and complex charts, users can now easily parse confirmed and recovered cases, alongside total deaths. Not only is this more neutral, but it allows for a broader range of information to be processed and, more importantly, absorbed by the user. Now, color is working in tandem with the data to support transparent and effective communication.

Freelance Designers and Donates To WHO COVID-19 Solidarity Fund

Editorial photographEditorial photographEliqs, makers of custom and personalized craft beer cans, typically for special events, has made available for sale custom vessels aimed at supporting the fight against COVID-19 while also providing financial support to freelance designers. Proceeds from the sales of the specially designed cans go to the WHO COVID-19 Solidarity Fund, and sales featuring designs by contributing freelancers get split between the WHO fund and the artist.Editorial photographEditorial photographAll nine available designs feature recommendations made by experts, such as practicing social distancing, washing hands, or how to recognize symptoms. Besides promoting coronavirus-fighting tips, the labels share little in common visually, reflecting a diverse range of styles, such as Eric Hinkley’s can which found inspiration in early 20th-century morale posters, or Cody Brown’s design mixing patterns and line work with fun type. Editorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

DK new identity

The brand overhaul was done by Angus Hyland and his team at the Pentagram London office, and according to the design studio is an attempt to reconnect with existing readers, as well as find those all-important new ones.

Hyland has kept the the open book shape that people will be familiar with, but reduced some of the detail – allowing it to work more effectively at different sizes and in different environments. The serif typeface is now gone, replaced by a bespoke serif.

While many of us might have had a soft spot for the old logo, this is undoubtedly an improvement. There was always a hint of clip art about the previous motif, and it very much felt like the symbol of an educational company rather than a publisher.

Pentagram’s work brings it up to date, but also transforms it into a surprisingly elegant mark. It’s easy to imagine it embossed on books of all kinds.

The agency have also introduced a new tagline – For the curious – which reflects the diversity of content DK publishes.

Women’s ad

Its latest campaign also addresses the topic, using a print ad in the new issue of Vanity Fair to illustrate the recurring pattern of coercive control behaviours often carried out by abusers. Created by Engine, the striking ad takes the form of a colourful, patterned graphic, which on closer inspection reveals hidden messages of abuse.

“In this difficult time awareness of the work Women’s Aid does is even more crucial, especially as some people will now be forced into isolation with their abusers,” says Engine creative director, Chris Ringsell. “This creative execution highlights the menacing form of abuse that is coercive control, a pattern of repeated, controlling and abusive behaviour.”

Art of Play

“We collaborated with Art of Play, producers of some of the finest playing cards in the universe, to bring you one strange deck. These cards feature a completely custom design in typical Messymod fashion which can be described as minimal, modern, graphic, quirky, stylized, grotesque, delightful and just plain weird.

We designed this deck so that each card has its own presence and personality, making them ideal pieces of artwork that can stand on their own. Each card has patterns of suits within suits for endless fun.

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Packaged in a premium letterpress-printed tuck box both inside and out. Printed by the U.S. Playing Card Co. on Art of Play’s trademark thin-stock preferred by cardists.

Individual decks available on www.artofplay.com

A book a day

Oliver Jeffers announced he would be reading one of his books every day until people are able to leave their homes. Readings take place at 6pm UK time and are broadcast via Instagram Stories, meaning viewers in different time zones can tune in and watch any time within the following 24 hours. All broadcasts have been recorded and will also be added to Jeffers’ website.Image result for oliver jeffers

Mac Barnett – the author behind the Jack Book and KidSpy series – is also broadcasting live readings via Instagram at 12pm Pacific time, which are available to watch for 24 hours. In a post announcing the readings, Barnett said he had around a month’s worth of picture books – “and if we run out I might read some chapter books”, he wrote.Image result for Mac Barnett books

Climate change has no borders

Ahead of the UN’s pivotal climate change conference in Glasgow this year, Johnson Banks has designed a fluid, colourful identity that makes climate change everyone’s problem.

New COP26 identity by Johnson Banks

The identity is centred around the earth – a simple icon, but not without its differences. Deep blues and greens are traded for a purple, white and lime palette, while borders are all but effaced by a beautiful marbling effect evocative of swirled paint. The image of the earth is also used as part of an eye which, for some, may bring to mind Monsters, Inc, but does neatly bolster the claim that “the world is watching”.

COP26 identity by Johnson BanksAn image of the COP26 identity by Johnson Banks

“The swirling coloured globe illustrates that the climate has no borders, alludes to currents and weather systems – and is intentionally beautiful,” reads a statement on the project. “It deliberately avoids directly using recognisable country shapes and is designed to fascinate people, wake them up and compel them to take urgent action to save our precious planet.”

The adapted colour scheme was chosen to complement the more “metaphorical” approach. “Just using traditional blues and green seemed a bit obvious, so by using brighter, more RGB colours we can show that this is a new take on traditional ‘world’ imagery,” explains founder and creative director Michael Johnson.The main design for the COP26 identity by Johnson BanksCOP26 identity by Johnson Banks

“We looked at a range of design approaches, from ‘neutral’ to ‘agit’ and it quickly became clear that for the Cabinet Office (our client) something that was hectoring or ‘angry’ might prove counter-productive,” Johnson told us. “As we developed three routes, the swirling globe became a clear favourite because we could use quite strident language with it, whilst we could all imagine it slowly turning throughout a three-day conference without driving anyone crazy!