Tag Archives: Typography

SOAC

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Brand identity for SOAC, calming eye drops for irritated eyes. Rasmus und Christin created a colorful brand identity including a functional packaging and sonorous naming. The logotype’s strong contrast of the letters point out the product’s main feature – immediate relief of visual disturbance.

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Women’s ad

Its latest campaign also addresses the topic, using a print ad in the new issue of Vanity Fair to illustrate the recurring pattern of coercive control behaviours often carried out by abusers. Created by Engine, the striking ad takes the form of a colourful, patterned graphic, which on closer inspection reveals hidden messages of abuse.

“In this difficult time awareness of the work Women’s Aid does is even more crucial, especially as some people will now be forced into isolation with their abusers,” says Engine creative director, Chris Ringsell. “This creative execution highlights the menacing form of abuse that is coercive control, a pattern of repeated, controlling and abusive behaviour.”

Climate change has no borders

Ahead of the UN’s pivotal climate change conference in Glasgow this year, Johnson Banks has designed a fluid, colourful identity that makes climate change everyone’s problem.

New COP26 identity by Johnson Banks

The identity is centred around the earth – a simple icon, but not without its differences. Deep blues and greens are traded for a purple, white and lime palette, while borders are all but effaced by a beautiful marbling effect evocative of swirled paint. The image of the earth is also used as part of an eye which, for some, may bring to mind Monsters, Inc, but does neatly bolster the claim that “the world is watching”.

COP26 identity by Johnson BanksAn image of the COP26 identity by Johnson Banks

“The swirling coloured globe illustrates that the climate has no borders, alludes to currents and weather systems – and is intentionally beautiful,” reads a statement on the project. “It deliberately avoids directly using recognisable country shapes and is designed to fascinate people, wake them up and compel them to take urgent action to save our precious planet.”

The adapted colour scheme was chosen to complement the more “metaphorical” approach. “Just using traditional blues and green seemed a bit obvious, so by using brighter, more RGB colours we can show that this is a new take on traditional ‘world’ imagery,” explains founder and creative director Michael Johnson.The main design for the COP26 identity by Johnson BanksCOP26 identity by Johnson Banks

“We looked at a range of design approaches, from ‘neutral’ to ‘agit’ and it quickly became clear that for the Cabinet Office (our client) something that was hectoring or ‘angry’ might prove counter-productive,” Johnson told us. “As we developed three routes, the swirling globe became a clear favourite because we could use quite strident language with it, whilst we could all imagine it slowly turning throughout a three-day conference without driving anyone crazy!

Dash’s the coffee brand

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Dassyras is a family-owned coffee roaster founded in 1987 to produce artisan Greek and filter coffee. As the second generation entered the business, they began crafting a unique espresso blend of several different specialty coffee beans. Its distinctively rich taste and impressive aroma paved the way for the product to gradually become a bestseller in the wholesale market. But it was literally a no name brand. Yet every great product deserves a great name, logo and packaging! The name needed to be short, good-sounding, easy to remember and somehow connected to the family business name. So the name “dash” fulfilled all three criteria and sounded a lot like “Dassyras”. Most importantly though, the word brings to mind moments of pause and relaxation.

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Dash was placed in between two dashes to indicate a pause/break. Just like em dashes, which are used to indicate a break in sentence. Meanwhile a coffee drop stands still, creating the impression that it will fall any minute. To convey the brand’s authentic and micro-roasting personality, we designed and printed their business cards on brown kraft paper. Following the same handmade logic, we made by hand, one by one, Dash’s wood labels with the logo wood-burned into them.

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Minimalism McDonald’s

It can be risky to go minimalist in an ad campaign: what if your audience miss the point entirely and don’t realise who the ad is for? Yet McDonald’s has created a series of outdoor ads in recent years that have boldly expressed just how deeply the fast food brand is embedded in our collective consciousness.

Joining these are a new series of posters from Leo Burnett for McDonald’s UK, which abandon photographs of juicy burgers or crisp fries and instead simply opt for words. Surely an ad creative’s delight to work on, the posters prove that we need no more than text to get us feeling peckish. The campaign was created in collaboration with renowned typographer David Schwen, and clearly hark back to Schwen’s earlier series titled Type Sandwiches.

Penagram’s new identity for Fisher-Price

Created by Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity sits alongside a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy featuring the simple tagline: Let’s be kids.

Developed by Pentagram partner Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity coincides with a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy, which includes the mission statement “put the fun back into functional” and the “play back into playtime”. This is accompanied by a simple but effective new tagline: Let’s be kids.

The new identity centres on a simplified version of the brand’s historic red ‘awning’ mark, in which its four scalloped edges have been reduced to three. The logotype has been redrawn in all lowercase, with letterforms that are slightly more refined but still quirky. The hyphen between the names is now a semicircle, echoing the scalloped edge of the awning, as well as resembling a smile.

Working with type designer Jeremy Mickel, Oberman introduced a custom, semi sans serif typeface called Let’s Be Glyphs, which is partly inspired by the historic typeface Cheltenham, widely used in the toy maker’s early advertising and packaging.

An alternative typeface has also been developed called Let’s Be Glyphs Bouncy, which features rotated characters and an uneven baseline, while sans serif font Maax will be used as a secondary typeface.

Moa Hunter honey packaging

Makuna honey, a variety of honey found in New Zealand and highly sought the world over, has been harvested by the Maori since ancient times. That history is reflected in the branding and packaging by agency Kallan & Co for Moa Hunter Prue Makuna HoneyEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

Each box is hand made, with Manuka oil brushed into the base, allowing for the aroma of the Manuka bushes to enhance the experience of opening the package. Each jar of honey is assembled by the family, with a hand-woven string and is then finished with a wax seal of the Moa Hunter logomark.

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Netherlands new identity.

As part of the country’s new identity, Studio Dumbar has designed a new wordmark for the Netherlands which gives a subtle nod to the national flower.

The wordmark combines the country acronym, NL and the tulip, the national flower. “The tulip is the most famous symbol of the Netherlands,” says Tom Dorresteijn, strategy director at Studio Dumbar. “But we wanted to steer clear of an obvious literal tulip as the symbol is too much connected to tourism and souvenirs.” Instead the team created a subtle silhouette of tulip petals between the N and the L letterforms.The typeface used in ‘the Netherlands’ element of the logo is Nitti Grotesk, designed by the Dutch type foundry Bold Monday. “This idiosyncratic typeface has warmth and humanity. The long ascenders give this font its particular character, which works really well with the logo,” explains Dorresteijn. “For us [the logo] expresses simplicity, smartness and clarity,” he adds, and will be in use from January (in eight possible language variations).