Tag Archives: Typography

Park Lane Hotel’s new identity

Park Lane, the luxury hotel in New York City, has launched a new identity designed to emerge from a “sea of old-world sameness” according to Mother Design, which was behind the new look.

“The previous branding, rooted in 70s luxury design, was in dire need of an update; not only from a visual perspective, but also to feel more inclusive,” Mother Design says. “We brought seasonality into the design, a super rich colour palette, and most of all brand language that’s both elevated and invitational; the poetic language entices locals as well as travellers.”

These ideas are central to the updated Park Lane wordmark, which taps into the appetite for Art Nouveau lettering at the moment. It features straight, architectural lines set against swooping, ornate curves designed to evoke “wandering paths” or “botanical tendrils”, according to the agency. The new wordmark has been condensed down into an icon (so far used minimally) in which the initials P and L are stacked on top of one another, the softness accentuated with ribbon-like detailing.

Macy’s

Macy’s is synonymous with the Holidays as an average of 50 million people tune in to watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. In addition to the parade, Macy’s delivers a series of Holiday programs across the country to celebrate the season. We worked with Macy’s to develop a promotional campaign with strong illustrations and custom typography that conveys the magic of the season.

“We believe that illustration can be a powerful tool for communicating strong ideas, connectingemotionally with users, and creating an experience that feels truly unique. Our collaboration with Carpenter Collective has proven to do just that.”— Gregory Dibisceglie, Macy’s Senior Creative Manager

From me to you Merry Christmas

Find out more https://carpentercollective.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/CarpenterCollective_MacysHoliday2016_09-877×1024.jpg

Starbucks Christmas cups

“For the start of our campaign, we typically come up with a mood board that centers every piece of the creative for the full season, and so this year, we came up with the centering point around gifting and the elements that surround it, as well as elements that are really celebratory,” said Suzie Reecer, associate creative director at Starbucks.

Throughout each of the four holiday cup designs, these factors of wrapping and celebration can be seen visually throughout the entire campaign. From commercial to coffee bags to—obviously—the holiday cups, every aspect gets centered around celebration and the celebration of gifting. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

For example, the first design found inspiration in a perfectly wrapped gift, featuring a circular pattern in holiday hues. The next cup features delicate ribbons encircling the cup, creating a joyful dancing movement, and it’s a design near and dear to Suzie. “It really makes me think of when I wrapped presents with my mom, and you finish all the wrapping, and you look down, and there are ribbons all over the place in the most beautiful way,” Suzie added. 

The other designs are more typographically based yet still tie into the gift-giving motifs through ribbons, stripes, sparkles, and, of course, the classical holiday hues. 

And while each of these cups is innovative and refreshing from the past cups, there’s a new design element that, quite literally, wraps up the entire design. “We do have a major change and shift in our design system this year, in the best way, which is bringing forward a gift tag on each of our cups,” Suzie said. Baristas will now have a dedicated spot to write customers’ names or even a note so that each drink sincerely feels like a specially gifted treat. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Zagat rebranded

In the late 70s, two Americans living in Paris found themselves wishing for a restaurant resource that reflected the opinions of their foodie friends rather than those of professional critics or mystery reviewers.

The couple, Nina and Tim Zagat, ended up creating the guide they’d always wanted themselves. The subsequent success of what became the Zagat Restaurant Guide introduced people to the idea of user-generated content and helped to democratise restaurant criticism forever.

The Zagat team brought in Brooklyn-based studio Franklyn to create a new brand system and campaign assets that would better represent the review site’s history while also feeling contemporary.

Franklyn started by giving the brand’s existing wordmark a typographic polish, shifting from Helvetica, which was used for its original 1979 iteration, to a more modern and digital-friendly cut of Neue Haas Grotesk by the Commercial Type foundry.Video Player.

While the new logo has a modernist sensibility rooted in the late 1970s with its strong grids, clear hierarchies and simple compositions, the studio introduced more flexibility in the rest of the brand system.

Key design elements include a digital-forward approach to colour, iconography, hierarchy and animation, along with a more fluid typographic palette featuring Avant Garde, Cheltenham and Tungsten.

London Olympia complex

Originally opened in 1886, Olympia London is undergoing a major redevelopment designed by Heatherwick Studio and SPPARC Architects, which aims to position the new area (known simply as Olympia) as a hub for creative arts in west London.

On top of the existing Olympia London events and exhibition spaces, there will be seven new buildings, including a new theatre, a live music arena, office and studio spaces, eateries and two hotels. The development is due to open to the public in 2024.

The branding for the area has been led by the London arm of SomeOne, with a brand strategy built around the idea that “it’s showtime”.

The Olympia wordmark, developed in collaboration with Miles Newlyn, follows a curve that draws on the arches of the historic Olympia Exhibition Halls. The primary typeface is Right Grotesk by Montreal-based foundry Pangram Pangram, and appears in various styles and weights as a nod to the venue’s vintage exhibition posters.

Meanwhile the letter ‘O’ has inspired a ring-shaped motif that appears across accompanying visuals. The circular band is made up of elements alluding to the area’s future attractions – musical instruments, office tables, food and drink – rendered in CG with the help of weareseventeen and 3D artist Ingrid Tsy. While reminiscent of the BBC One circle idents, the circle works nicely as a framing device, particularly when animated.

Express yourself

Marta Veludo Studio is based in Amsterdam and often pulls influences from folk art, pop culture, bright color, and inspiring movements into her designs. In her most recent creation, Marta Veludo created the visual identity and packaging for Golden Apple’s new makeup line. The products infuse classic design elements with stereotypically GenZ inspiration, making for a line that inspires consumers to tap into new ways of expressing themselves. Each product is packaged uniquely but makes up a cohesive set with bold typography and punchy colors.

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Science you can eat

Originally published in 1972, this Vicki Cobb classic was due for an update and redesign. This 256-page hands-on book of edible experiments makes it easy for kids to have fun with science. We were responsible for the design and illustration of the book from the typography system, the structure and layout of the experiments, to the informative technical illustrations, to the colorful chapter openers. We used a limited 2-color palette paired with modern, icon-driven illustrations to help take this book to a new generation of readers.

Find out more https://carpentercollective.com/project/science-experiment-book/

Tad Carpenter Sunday Sun

The American designer has spent the last six years drawing, painting, stitching or sculpting a sun every Sunday – and his work is collected in a book dedicated to his ongoing experiment.

“As a human, I was feeling overwhelmed, anxious, depressed, off, all of the emotional catchphrases you can think of, insert them here,” he remembers. “All was going great, yet I was not feeling like myself and I didn’t know why exactly.”

After an especially long week, one Sunday morning Carpenter says he couldn’t get to sleep and went to his studio to watch the sun come up. He started thinking about all the times, as a child, he was sent off to go and play – whether colouring in, building a fort or reading a book – and decided to designate a specific time each week to “just play”.

He knew he needed some kind of structure, and after deciding to take the sun as a recurring motif for the project has since designed dozens of different kinds – from stitched pennants and papier maché helmets, to typographic expressions and hand-drawn illustrations.

Sunday Suns, which is published by Counter-Print, brings together his efforts, placing them alongside essays written by Carpenter exploring his thoughts on creativity and life as a designer.

“It has thoroughly given me a sense of clarity. However, maybe the most important and unexpected aspect of this self-reflective experiment is how these little suns have provided hope to others.”

Sunday Suns is published by Counter-Print; counter-print.co.ukcarpentercollective.com

And

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And emerged in response to the question “How might we create a gender neutral brand identity for a line of period products?” Through extensive market research and brand discovery process, the identity of And began to take shape as an inclusive, high quality product line committed to meeting the needs of people with periods and disrupting outdated gender norms in the industry. And, inspired by the word ‘androgynous,’ is for him and her and them and you—And is for all of us. 

Gender dysphoria is defined as distress caused by a discrepancy between a person’s gender identity and their anatomy. For some trans, non-binary, and gender-nonconforming people, the experience of menstruation can trigger intense feelings of gender dysphoria, as many associate menstruation with femininity. This association perpetuates harm, as not all women menstruate and not all people who menstruate identify as women. The menstrual care industry plays an important role in redefining gender norms by exemplifying inclusive representation.

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Breeze rebranded

Leeds City Council has run Breeze for the past 20 years, offering activities, events and discounts to under 19 year-olds across the city. To coincide with the launch of a new membership app, it commissioned Kiss Branding to refresh the identity of the platform, to take in a diverse audience of toddlers, kids and teens plus also parents and tourists in the city.

Kiss Branding created a contemporary campaign featuring bright and bold typography and illustration, created in-house. “We landed on the concept of ‘Freedom’s a Breeze’ as a core brand idea,” says Poonam Saini, creative director at Kiss. “Breeze makes finding activities and discounts in Leeds ‘easy breezy’ so it was important that our new brand embodies this sense of simplicity and contentment.

“The swooping logo and typography, playful yet refined colour palette along with contemporary, inclusive illustrations come together to create a brand worthy of the Breeze offering – a world away from the typical ‘town council’ identity they had previously.”