Tag Archives: Typography

moonlit

Working with the Creative Director and in-house creative team at Moonpig, Ian Styles team have completely overhauled the brand. Most of the work was done with our team embedded directly within the creative department, which was crucial to understanding the culture, customers, and vision for the business. 

Building on their new positioning our idea was a simple one; create a whole new world for Moonpig, one where we imagine that we live life on the moon, where the normal rules don’t apply.

We seek to capture people in our new world’s gravity, pulling them towards us for a moment, offering an escape, where boring is banished, the obvious avoided and where life, is more fun and lighthearted.

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Kaibosh new identity

Eyes before guys, y’all. Snask developed a new, hip brand identity for an eyewear company in Norway, Kaibosh. Combined, the text, color palette, and copy give Kaboish a young and fun personality, instantly making the experience of going to get your eyes checked—which is pretty boring—way better. The approach also allows the frames to truly stand out in the store, helping consumers find stylish frames that suit them perfectly.

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“We got contacted by the Norwegian eyewear company Kaibosh. They felt that they had become too boring as opposed to what they should be, a trendy and bold eyewear brand. They felt their identity was too clean and they wanted to be more expressive and outgoing. The fashionable contender would finally get a fitting dress as well as a lovely new voice. We got the assignment to start out with keeping their existing logotype and from that develop their new brand ranging from signs, ads, packaging, bags, posters as well as create their entire flagship store.”

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Vasava uses hand-drawn type to reimagine children’s classics

Barcelona-based agency Vasava takes a trip down memory lane by reimagining classic children’s book covers in a bid to encourage a new generation of readers.

Some of the titles Vasava has renewed, such as Treasure Island and Around the World in 80 Days, are books less popular with kids today, so the agency adopted an eye-catching concept. “We incorporated illustrations into the lettering, creating vignettes, which would act as a visual synopsis for each novel,” says the studio. “The comic book style was paired with bright colour palettes to create a happy and inviting collection of books that any kid would proudly display on their bookshelf.”

Cover for Alice in Wonderland

Each title has its own lettering which hints towards the story within, such as Peter Pan’s flowing type that makes the reader think of pirate flags and Wendy’s old-fashioned nighty. To really bring the covers to life though, Vasava took a detailed approach when deciding what the illustrations should contain and they started by highlighting the key characters, locations and objects from each of the novels. 

Cover for Peter Pan

The collection of covers pop with vibrant, clashing colours and are crammed with intricate illustrations. What ties the whole series together is the vintage treatment of each title, reinforcing the idea of the books as literary classics.

Cover for Jungle Book
Cover for The Wizard of Oz

Liberty rebrand

The luxury department store has unveiled new branding by Pentagram’s Harry Pearce that borrows cues from the historic sign that first hung over the door.

Liberty logo by Pentagram

The new logo puts the name of the store front and centre, dropping the reference to its London home and instead moving it to additional brand assets alongside a redesigned crest. The iconic deep purple hue remains intact across the packaging design, while the gold seen across the lettering has been “refined”.

Liberty logo evolution

The new branding draws upon Liberty’s lengthy history, in particular the original sign used at its Great Malborough Street location, though the historic link may appear subtle to casual onlookers thanks to the identity’s decidedly sleeker look.

The connection to the past is established in smaller details like the full-stop, which has been reinstated on the wordmark as per the original sign. Meanwhile, the angular serifs have been dropped from the logotype in favour of a new sans-serif typeface similarly rooted in the original design.

“The process of rebranding Liberty has been one of craft, archaeology and refinement,” says Pearce. “The logotype itself hails from the lettering in the original sign above the Great Marlborough Street front door, carefully redrawn to make it the most authentic logotype in Liberty’s history.”

OneFootball

DesignStudio has created vibrant new branding for the football app, including an updated logo, a visual generator and a content strategy built around the idea of a ‘vibesmith’

“[OneFootball] needed a brand that adapted to Generation Z,” explains Vinay Mistry, design director at DesignStudio. “Generation Z is a generation of contrasts: they’re constantly adapting, they’re constantly changing, and football’s actually very similar. The rhythm of the game changes constantly as well. It made us think, actually there’s some lovely synergy there – can we define a personality for OneFootball that represents that?”

OneFootball identity by Design Studio

At the core of the project was the creation of a new logo. While researching the existing logo, the design team noticed its resemblance to the pictogramsdeveloped for the 1972 Olympic Games held in Munich, and also felt it was too similar to WhatsApp’s logo.

However, the team didn’t scrap the old logo altogether. Instead, they broke it down to its key parts – legs and football – and repurposed these elements into a new graphic forming a number one and a football in reference to the brand name. The new design is immediately more contemporary, partly because it does away with the gendered implications of the old logo.

OneFootball identity by Design Studio

Heinz new look

The identity covers all of Heinz’s products around the world, bringing them under the same visual umbrella. The redesign arrived on shelves earlier this year, and prominently features the brand’s ‘keystone’ symbol – so shaped for the Keystone State, Pennsylvania, where the company was founded.

JKR’s work makes good use of the mark, tapping into its familiarity, and using it as a playful framing device, with spaghetti hoops, saucy beans and plump tomatoes all interacting with it.

It’s accompanied by a pair of brand typefaces, Heinz Label – which has letterforms that mimic the Heinz logo – and Intro, which offers a range of styles including inline caps and script. A new colour palette includes the requisite Heinz Red, alongside green, yellow, blue and white.JKR Managing Director Jonny Spindler says the masterbrand celebrates Heinz’s “simple greatness”, and creates “brand unification” across the various parts of its business.

Branding an Olympic athlete

While gymnastics is Tulloch’s main focus, he is also keen to build a platform beyond competitive sport – whether through mentoring young athletes and working with youth groups or launching his own range of clothing and merchandise. For someone who grew up looking up to athletes like Cristiano Ronaldo, Roger Federer and Michael Jordan, success isn’t just about winning medals or standing on the podium – it’s also about using your platform to inspire and motivate others and having a wider cultural impact.

“It’s always been my dream and my goal to have a brand,” he tells CR. “I look at people like Ronaldo and Jordan and their brand and what they have … and they’re more than an athlete or a sportsperson,” he tells CR. “I love inspiring people, I’m into fashion, I’ve got a lot more that I want to do outside of gymnastics as well, so that’s something I’ve always wanted.”

Thanks to a collaboration with branding agency JKR, Tulloch now has his own visual identity, and a soon-to-be-released clothing range featuring upbeat phrases inspired by his attitude to sport. The identity launched earlier this year, and Tulloch hopes it will help him build his profile and reach a wider audience outside of gymnastics.

Haarala Hamilton photography

Haarala Hamilton logo design by LanternAward-winning photographers Liz and Max Haarala Hamilton are well known for their portrait, food, travel and editorial creative. They have featured in various publications globally, including Huck Magazine, Boat Magazine, The Observer Magazine and Observer Food Monthly.

The simple branding system showcases Liz and Max’s greatest works across applications including business cards and portfolio brochures. Alongside photography, a suite of creative headlines play on the ‘Haa Ha’ wordmark, bringing life to conventionally mundane collateral including invoices and packing tape.

Haarala Hamilton brand marketing materialsHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton web design by Lantern

Created by Lantern

Futr rebrand by Lantern

The identity revolves around Futr’s new winking face logo, which will also appear as the friendly avatar alongside messages exchanged with the company’s chatbots. Futr allows companies to have AI-powered conversations with customers – automatically answering queries where it can, and passing anything else onto a real person.

Lantern’s identity is intended to step away from the “abstract shapes and chat bubbles” that are found across the tech sector. According to the studio, the palette of yellow, pink and green is a deliberately optimistic choice, that helps set Futr apart from the “corporate teal” of its competitors. The sans serif font is Telegraf, from Pangram Pangram Foundry.

San Francisco Civic Music Association Brand

The San Francisco Civic Symphony wanted to grow as an organization and experiment with new genres, while fostering their legacy within San Francisco. We performed a brand audit leading to a full rebrand, messaging, and campaign to launch their new name and look at the 2018 Gala event. The rebrand injected creativity and imagination to represent the unique diversity of the organization. We paired modern letterforms in a non-linear sequence to represent notes on the scale. The new logo became the centerpiece for all collateral, helping to establish the brand in the community and build equity around the new identity.

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The results have attracted new participants, increased the number of musicians in the association and ultimately opened up more musical variety to a the San Francisco community.

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Find more here.