Tag Archives: Typography

San Diego Zoo & Safari Park brand

Pentagram partner Michael Bierut has brought all of the organisation’s work under a single brand, which is now known as the San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance.

Today, the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park are two of the largest zoos in the world, and Rex the lion lives on in the form of the Rex’s Roar statue that greets visitors at its entrance.

Together, the zoo and safari park are home to more than 15,000 rare and endangered animals, are part of a non-profit conservation organisation that is committed to saving species worldwide, and boast one of the largest zoological membership associations in the world, with more than half a million members.

Last updated over a decade ago, the zoo’s previous identity treated its non-profit arm San Diego Zoo Global, the San Diego Zoo and the San Diego Zoo Safari Park as separate brands with their own visual systems.

Pentagram’s Michael Bierut and his team were briefed to create a new brand identity that could connect with the broadest audience possible – from the families who visit and support the zoo and safari park to the scientific community who contribute to its research.

Creating a new name for the zoo was the first step in a two-year collaboration between Pentagram and the parent organisation, which has been rebranded as the San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance (SDZWA).

The reimagined mark brings together three animals that are important to the history of the SDZWA: Rex the lion; a California condor, a species brought back from the brink of extinction in a signature achievement by the organisation; and a white rhino, which is currently undergoing one of most successful managed breeding programmes in the world.

Combined as part of one singular circular mark, the three individual animal images play with positive and negative space as a nod to the interdependence of all living things on the planet.

Continuing with this theme, the use of positive-negative space hints at the ongoing threat of extinction in a series of Saving Species Worldwide posters, which feature animal illustrations in silhouette.

The identity also extends to a system of sub-brands for the various components of the organisation, which are further differentiated by an animal-themed colour palette. This includes Habitat Green for the main alliance brand, along with Bumblebee Yellow, Macaw Red and Elephant Gray.

Otta rebrand

Founded in 2019 by Sam Franklin, Theo Margolius and Xav Kearney – all of whom previously worked at estate agency Nested – Otta offers a decidedly different take on the drudgery of job hunting.

Rather than displaying users long lists of jobs, it tailors recommendations according to what people are actually searching for – taking into account desired salary, size of company, industry and so on. Otta also offers extra details about companies actively recruiting including a profile, the amount of funding they’ve received, company values and benefits.

“We wanted these to be really bold, expressive and exaggerated, and have that sense of being warm, soft and enveloping but also bright and a bit lairy. We wanted to get people’s attention and send a signal that this was something that was the complete opposite of some of the other experiences.” Ragged Edge

Vegan skincare brand

Scottish vegan skincare is a genuine thing! With bold typography and the warmed fuzzies of the gradient, this brand designed by Too Gallus will give you a sentimental kick in the face every morning.

Too Gallus was enlisted to bring to life the brand identity in a way the reflected its bold and playful approach. With an audience of skin-care savvy Gen-xers it was essential that the product come to market swinging and instantly stood out as a name to watch in the beauty and skincare industry. The brand had to be exciting, and fun yet still carry its self with all of the weight and authority of a major player. We were conscious not to make the brand to novel and were aware that all through the process although the aim was to target a younger audience that the professionalism of the brand must never be lost.

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When it came to packaging we knew we had hard competition in the current world of beauty and cosmetics, we needed to craft a product that not only had shelf appeal but was fun and interesting to receive when posted out through director to consumer commerce. We opted for a material focused approach. crafting holographic foil box outers with an embossed white gloss finish, channelling early y2k aesthetic. Our research presented us with futuristic materials, fun bold type and an ever shifting colour palette. paired with a minimal inner containers – using a screen printed logo type on the glassware. The result was a stunning, tactile product which harks older generations back to their formative years and serves Gen-X that tough of 2000s culture they love so much.

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San Francisco Symphony’s new identity brings classical music up to date.

For many years, classical music has suffered from an ongoing PR problem, which portrays it as unchanging, old-world and elitist, and therefore unable to appeal to new audiences.

San Francisco Symphony decided to tackle these preconceptions head on with its recent diversity- and inclusion-focused organisational overhaul, following the appointment of conductor and composer Esa-Pekka Salonen as its new music director.

“It’s true that the origins of classical music are hundreds of years old, if not more, but the general population doesn’t tend to realise that it has been in a constant state of flux since its inception,” says Collins creative director, Louis Mikolay.

“It has been defining and redefining itself with each generation – even woven into movie scores, video games, and beyond. Classical music has an incredible amount to offer all of us, especially in such a stressful time. We have been honoured to work with the multi-talented teams at The San Francisco Symphony to help broaden its relevance in the modern world.”

Reverting to Type exhibition features protest posters.

The online exhibition features a mix of famous names and less-heard voices, who all use letterpress techniques to express their feelings on a range of contemporary issues.

Fakt/Fake by Erik Spiekermann
Boris_Johnson by New North Press and Stewart Lee
We Got Brexit Dumb by John Christopher, Flowers & Fleurons

“Our idea was to unite everyone in a letterpress show where the emphasis was on the message of the work, rather than just the technique,” continues Ardagh. “The special collaborative print editions we produced were our way of making sure that the voices we were representing were diverse. This had begun early last year when we worked with a talented group of adults with learning disabilities who had clear ideas about the issues they wanted to communicate. We wanted to do something similar with a group from the local homeless community but the virus made that impossible. We did manage to connect with a Senegalese asylum seeker and produce a poster based on their sketches but didn’t manage to broaden this out as being associated with speaking out put their application at great risk.

Fairness by New North Press and Extinction Rebellion Art Group / Paris68redux
Ladies! Being Singled Out by Gender vs. Ability is a Confidence Boost! by Jennifer Farrell, Starshaped Press
No Safe Place by Anthony Burrill
Our Solidarity by Dave Darcy, One Strong Arm
What a mess by Dafi Kühne, babyinktwice

Reverting to Type can be viewed online at revertingtotype.comnew-north-press.co.uk

Anthony Burrill 7-storey-high mural for Leeds

Burrill worked together with multidisciplinary studio Bread Collective, street art initiative In Good Companyand property business King & Co to bring the mural to life. The first ideas for the piece came in mid-2019, though In Good Company founder and curator Laura Wellington says the design “couldn’t feel more relevant for the current time”.

“From the start, the plan was that this piece will be here for the people of Leeds for centuries, but I think it’s the perfect message of unity to start 2021 – a year when continued connection and community will be so vital,” she explains.

Burrill studied graphic design in Leeds, and says the city left a “powerful imprint” on him and his artistic practice – something he’s been able to pay back with the piece. Its big type and simple message is characteristic of the artist’s work, but does feel particularly resonant in a time when togetherness can feel like a distant concept.

Veganly Is SO Adorable

SO Veganly is a natural delight. Utilizing a slim and sophisticated typeface for it’s logo, this Texas-based eatery appeals to a millennial audience. The hand drawn illustrations that adorn the bottles and boxes have an abstract look that feels fresh. Celebrating eating well with So Veganly with an earthly color pallate and a minimal design that speaks to how fresh their food is. 

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The concept of the re-brand was to embody the holistic nature and approach of the business with a fresh, intriguing and vibrant brand identity, incorporating hand-drawn illustrations and patterns that tell a story through design. SO Veganly is a place for everyone to come together to experience and explore nutritious vegan food, in way that that feels like home-cooked food, taking not short cuts in creating fulfilling meals in a space that celebrates nature’s finest ingredients.

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Burger King rebrand

The fast food giant is showing no signs of slowing down as we enter a new year, however, having just unveiled its first major rebrand in over two decades.

At the heart of the rebrand is a reimagined version of its existing logo, which ditches the reflective burger bun for a more stripped back design.

“The main difference now is that we adjusted the colour to make it more vibrant and more like the colours of food. And we adjusted the proportions of the bun to look more like the products that we sell.”

Meanwhile, a more in-your-face photography style using dramatic close-ups to communicate the fast food chain’s recent emphasis on its fresh food credentials, plus a new illustration style, adds a playful touch to the overall look.

% Chocolate

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“The percentage of cocoa in chocolate is a pretty reliable indicator of where it sits on the sweet to bitter scale, more so than descriptions such as milk, semisweet, or bittersweet. It’s how most customers navigate through the craft chocolate scene, hence why we have seen brands plaster their packaging with percentages. Percentage Chocolate explores how this can be done elegantly in keeping with the essence of craft chocolate.  

The answer? A circle. 

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Circles are a common occurrence in nature- the rings of a tree, nuts, oranges, mushrooms, and peppercorns-all of these flavor profiles are also found in chocolate. Chocolate has over 600 flavor compounds, and letting it melt uncovers these hidden complexities, flavors, and aromas.

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Percentage chocolate creates a range of chocolate from creamy milk chocolate to dark. Milk and dark are differentiated by the use of silver foil instead of gold and a lighter selection of colors. The colors are earthy, and we toned down the vibrancy for more of a soothing effect. Purple in consumers’ minds means chocolate, so, of course, we honored that color in our line up.

Hand Sanitiser ads

Thanks to coronavirus, a new creative category is on the rise – hand sanitiser advertising. As more and more of us stash bottles in our bags, brands are going to be under increasing pressure to get noticed in a crowded category. So it makes sense that both Dettol and Lifebuoy have invested in major ad campaigns, but it’s interesting to note the different directions each has taken.

Lifebuoy’s Bish, Bash, Bosh campaign , which comprises a flm and outdoor ads with illustrations by Dan Woodger.

It’s fun, and God knows we all need some of that after months of frightening news and warning notices about social distancing. Making hand sanitiser playful and engaging must have been a tough brief, but Mullenlowe and Woodger have pulled it off in impressive fashion.

The illustrations are punchy, and work as well as static outdoor ads as they do in a gross-out animation that reminds us why we all need sanitiser in the first place.