Tag Archives: Typography

FACEBOOK rebrand

Facebook has launched a new company brand of the same name (this time in capitals) to differentiate the company from the app, which will continue using its current logo and branding.

The new branding aims to make Facebook’s ownership of other apps and products – including Instagram, Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, Oculus and Portal – clearer to users. This follows a decision made in June to add the tagline ‘from Facebook’ within all of Facebook’s apps and services.

The new identity includes a capitalised wordmark in a bespoke typeface and an ever-changing colour palette that will adapt depending on the product it appears on. It was carried out by Facebook’s internal design team in collaboration with UK-based type foundry Dalton Maag and brand consultants Saffron.

Facebook’s design team said the rebrand was built on three “design behaviours”: ‘clarity’, ’empathy’ and ‘creating space’. The aim – according to the team – was to create a brand that “simplifies and builds understanding”, is “respectful of context and environment” in which it operates and creates space for sharing people’s stories.

With its use of capital letters, a custom font and rounded corners, the word mark is designed to make a clear distinction between company and app, which uses a lower case word mark in a bold sans font.

“We designed the new company wordmark with clarity and openness in mind. It’s built on a stable structure through the use of consistent stroke width, harmonised capital letters and a horizontal emphasis. The generous spacing and open letterforms allow clarity at small sizes, and the subtle softening of corners and diagonals adds a sense of optimism,” said the team.

Fox’s rebrand

The Fox logo has undergone a subtle redesign, with a chunky new version also created for animations, which show the original logo morphing into the geometric version. According to Trollbäck+Company, the studio reduced the updated mark down to its core components, broke it apart, and then used the pieces as abstract shapes and patterns across the entire rebrand. These ‘broken letters’ will be used in patterns and ‘creative framing’, and play a role in everything from social media posts to huge billboards. The updated identity – which Fox is calling a ‘brand evolution – will now appear across the 17 stations owned by the entertainment company, as well as its 100+ affiliate stations.

According to Alex Moulton, Chief Creative Officer at Trollbäck+Company, the work is intended to position Fox as “an entertainment brand that’s forging culture”. The studio’s Executive Creative Director, Elliott Chaffer, adds, “The way the industry is today, the middle of the road is the best place to get run over. We needed to bring back and champion the brand’s ability to take big swings and bigger risks.”

Temple’s identity

Leeds’ new district visual identity has been designed by local studio Thompson Brand Partners and is named after its landmark Temple Works building, which features a distinctly Egyptian façade.

The long-abandoned, Grade I-listed building is the centrepiece of a regeneration project being led by developer CEG. The newly created district of Temple is set to be home to a host of offices, homes and leisure spaces.

Local studio Thompson Brand Partners was chosen to create the visual identity for the district, which needed to show that it “knows where it comes from”, according to ECD Ian Thompson.

The type-focused logo looks to reflect the façade of Temple Works, while ancient Egypt is also the inspiration for the colour palette, which includes yellow ochre and Egyptian blue.

yahoo! rebrand

They say that all publicity is good publicity, but Yahoo has been particularly prone to the bad kind in recent years. A series of data scandals combined with doubts over Yahoo’s relevance in the modern marketplace together paint a pretty sombre picture.

However, the brand is still looking to the future, which it’ll go into with a new visual identity created by Pentagram in a project led by New York-based Partner Michael Bierut. With the refresh comes a new logo that sees Yahoo do away with its former goofy typeface in place of a slick, lower case sans-serif.

The new logo is said to throw back to the original 1996 design, though the logo itself hadn’t changed radically over the subsequent 20 years, the tilted exclamation mark having been a staple of its logo throughout this time.

Today, the branding is decidedly sleeker and neatly ties all of Yahoo’s sprawling sub-brands under one identity. Meanwhile, the vibrant purple palette (comprising ‘grape jelly’, ‘malbec’ and ‘hulk pants’) packs a punch, while the overall simplicity does push the exclamation mark to centre stage. Images showing the new look splashed across billboards in a real-world context look significantly more pulled together and representative of a contemporary tech brand.

Bella Vida

After years of struggling with cystic acne, founder and CEO Erin Schmidt of luxury skincare line Bella Vida Santa Barbara decided to craft a line of products like cleansers and serums that could naturally help acne sufferers. Bella Vida means “Beautiful Life,” and on the company’s website, they tout that their passion is to help everyone feel beautiful and love themselves, a lofty goal that the cosmetic industry often ironically misses.

Editorial photograph

The font-focused logo for Bella Vida Santa Barbara went through three rounds of designs in-house by Schmidt, who was inspired by luxury designers Chanel, Gucci, Yves St. Laurent and Christian Dior. Schmidt tried several fonts she had on hand and went to a group of fellow entrepreneurs for feedback.Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Teach First rebrand

The charity has ditched its “corporate” identity in favour of an all-encompassing rebrand that reflects its mission to create fair education for all.

The update was almost two years in the making, and required Teach First to “take a hard look at their brand”, says Johnson Banks. The charity wanted to move away from its previous style and embrace something bolder that would reflect its focus on tackling inequality and helping children reach their potential, while also conveying a “grittier, more direct tone of voice”.

The studio says the refreshed identity also needed communicate with a “bewildering array” of people, from graduates, teachers and headmasters to people considering changing career as well as government departments and corporate sponsors.