Tag Archives: Typography

12 day of Chocolate: A Designer Collection

Now this is something I want for Christmas?

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Every year Chase Design Group creates a holiday gift to share with clients. For 2013, they hit upon the idea of doing a chocolate gift. A humorous riff on the “12 Days of Christmas” seemed like the perfect way to feature Chase’s inventive design and Clear Image’s outstanding printing.

Each wrapper features a different aspect of the design process from frayed nerves to a perfect proof. Every designer at Chase got a chance to design their own wrapper both inside and out (please view below each individual design credits). Each design uniquely conveys the hectic and often humorous experience of working as a designer.1_7_13_12DaysofChocolate_2.jpg1_7_13_12DaysofChocolate_5.jpg1_7_13_12DaysofChocolate_9.jpg

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This is me, Full Stop.

Written by Here Design’s Philip Cowell and designed by the studio’s co-founder Caz Hildebrand, This Is Me, Full Stop gives voice to 12 everyday punctuation marks and has them explain the jobs they do in helping us to communicate. 

Alongside the writing, the marks are used illustratively across most of the pages, while at other times they form the basis for a range of patterns and designs using a wide variety of typefaces (these are listed at the end of the book).

Despite its sparse text, the book also manages to cover a bit of grammatical history, too: from the Ancient Greeks’ aobve-the-line use of the full stop, for example, to the theory that it was a monk who designed the first question mark after copying the shape of a cat’s tail.

This Is Me, Full Stop is a fun celebration of how a handful of little marks have been helping us to communicate with each other for hundreds of years – and a reminder that each one is a beguiling piece of design in its own right.

Typefaces of London

New type foundry launches with twelve fonts inspired by the capital, its buildings, language and traditions

Its first collection features fonts designed by the founders and a London Dingbat set by designer Peter Grundy. The set combines famous London landmarks, iconic designs and symbols with a set of London door numbers (added by Harpin).

Other fonts include London CircleLine, which Harpin says was inspired by the Post Office Double Line typeface designed by John Miles (who Harpin used to work for), the London Underground Roundel and Nancy Wyman’s designs for the Mexico Olympics in 1968.
London CircleLine by Paul Harpin
London Hoxton Square by Paul Harpin
London Fatface by Paul Harpin
London Modern by Paul Harpin
London Bloomsbury Old style by Paul & Patricia Hickson
London Belgravia Pro by Paul Hickson

Smoke free Britain

In the 1970s and 80s, artist and designer Biman Mullick distributed thousands of posters highlighting the harmful impacts of smoking and passive smoking. With his work featured in a new exhibition at the Wellcome Collection.

Anti-smoking poster by Biman Mullick / Cleanair. Images courtesy of the Wellcome CollectionIn the 1970s, Biman Mullick was teaching at an art school in England when he became concerned about the dangers of passive smoking. At the time, smoking indoors was commonplace and almost half (45%) of the UK’s adult population were cigarette smokers. Doctors had already established a link between smoking and lung cancer but little was known about the consequences of inhaling second-hand smoke.

Mullick was not a smoker but became concerned that if smoking was bad for you, then passive smoking might be too – so he created a set of posters asking students not to light up in his classrooms. He printed them out in black and white and put them up around the college but was quickly asked to remove them by the prinicipal. “There was no law against smoking in the classroom … and he said that smoking was a part of British culture,” says Mullick.

He sent his posters to newspapers and public health authorities, who immediately took notice. “Health operatives had started noticing that smoking should not be permitted in hospitals and health buildings, and they started buying my posters,” explains Mullick. Within a few years, his posters were in use throughout the country and by 1984, he had distributed 186,000 of them.

Most were distributed in hospitals, schools and colleges. They also appeared in the background in several TV shows.

Mullick’s designs are striking: the influence of Indian visual culture is evident in his work and his posters combine bold colours with hard-hitting phrases and playful illustrations. One reads ‘smoking is slow motion suicide’ and features an image of a deceased turtle with a cigarette in its mouth while another warns that ‘passive smoking kills’.

Poetry typography

Pentagram has brought a new typographic look to the Poetry Foundation and its long-established magazine, Poetry, which explores the visual possibilities of this unique written form.In a project that unites the look of the Foundation, Poetry magazine and the organisation’s online presence, Pentagram New York designed a new grid-based identity which allows for the name to be displayed in myriad different ways and emphasises the place of graphic design and type in shaping our appreciation of this written form.‘We considered a number of different directions, but this was the only direction where the focus was on visual treatments of the word ‘Poetry’. We found ourselves thinking of everything from the radical Futurist poetry of Marinetti to the idiosyncratic punctuation of Emily Dickinson and e.e. cummings. From that we took license to divide up the word into its 2 x 3 grid and to experiment with different kinds of letterforms and mark-making.’ Michael Bierut

Top Girl Studio

Graphic designer Anna Potter addresses female empowerment, internet culture and our obsession with social media through witty Instagram posts and zines. Her iGIRL project – described as “the burn book of Instagram” – captures the millennial’s quest for the perfect feed with a series of statements inspired by real-life comments on the platform.Potter studied graphic design at Central Saint Martins. She is based in Bournemouth and has been working under the name Top Girl Studio since graduating in 2015. Explaining her decision to go freelance, she says: “After finishing uni, I realised I didn’t want to end up producing work that I wasn’t in love with or vaguely interested in.” She set up an Instagram feed and began sharing self-initiated projects – a strategy which led to commissions from Nike and Missguided.Potter recently collaborated with Nike and fashion blogger Girl on Kicks to create a series of images promoting Air Max Day. She also created a limited edition poster celebrating International Women’s Day for Riposte magazine. Potter was one of six female artists asked to create a poster – along with Lakwena Maciver, Tracey Ma, Paula Scher, Lynnie Zulu and Sonya Dyakova – and proceeds were donated to humanitarian organisation Women for Women.Nike x GIRLONAIR

Potter’s Instagram feed is carefully curated. She sees the platform as an opportunity to promote not just her work but herself and her interests, with photos of her favourite brands alongside recent work and images of things, people and places that have inspired her. “I’m a designer, but I also look at myself as a brand. I don’t want people to just buy into the product or idea I create, I want people to buy into me,” she says.

She hopes her account – and the success she has had with it so far – will inspire others to forge their own route into the industry. “I really do believe that social media gives us a unique opportunity where there are no rules to abide by. You don’t have to ‘do that’ or ‘do this’ because it’s normal or what everyone else does. Do what you love, show the world what you’re good at and make money doing something you’re passionate about. Take Instagram seriously. Follow everyone and start the conversation,” she says.

I just love typography as the main element of brand design. LOVE has just designed packaging for LA fashionista and socialite, Peri Arenas.With a new fashion boutique opening on California’s Robertson Boulevard, Peri briefed LOVE to design packaging that would create standout and match her ballsy personality.

Taking cues from the playful fashion labels Peri loves – as well as her straight-talking style – LOVE developed the PERI.A brand identity and rolled it out on the packaging. Brought to life with punchy copy and attention grabbing type, PERI. A sets out to shake up the American fashion-scape which Peri felt had become “boring and safe”.

Chris Myers, senior creative director, who headed up the project explains how LOVE was approached: “It’s not often that you’re recommended to a client in a Beverley Hills hair salon – but that’s how we ended up on a call with Peri.

if you like this, here a brand I created using type. Design Museum Rebrand