Tag Archives: Typography

Spyscape brand

On New York’s 8th Avenue, a new museum rich with interactive experiences promises that the visitor will “see yourself and the world around you more clearly through the lens of spying”. We look at how a team of creative talent brought this ambitious new experience to life.

Led by Walter, SomeOne were appointed to work on the brand, developing the Question Everything tagline. Working with type designer Gareth Hague of Alias, SomeOne devised a visual identity scheme in which a bespoke typeface with three cuts plays with the notion of concealment, privacy and cryptography. “The typeface is unusual as it consists of three cuts that can be connected,” says Emily James, Project Lead Designer at SomeOne. “Two ‘redacted’ cuts show only part of the letterform, but often enough to distinguish what character it is. The third cut is a complete letterform that can either be used to hint at the remaining stroke, or used in its entirety for total clarity.”


Why do Google, Airbnb and Pinterest all have similar logos?

Why Do Google, Airbnb, And Pinterest All Have Such Similar Logos?

Why do so many tech companies’ logos look the same? From Google and Airbnb to Spotify and Pinterest, these companies have gradually shifted their branding from idiosyncratic typefaces to remarkably similar sans-serif fonts. This month,a viral tweet from the type studio Oh No Type Co compared those four companies’ former and current logos, demonstrating how alike each company’s current branding looks.


“My theory is they want to integrate their look and feel from a logo standpoint with their UI. They’re looking for a really cohesive identity, a cohesive experience and look and feel. As they look at their UI for their apps, for their website, or their interface, they’re trying to simplify it. As you simplify, you move away from some of the quirkier and more unique logotypes that these companies originally launched with.” –Howard Belk, co-CEO and chief creative officer at Siegel+Gale

“The amount of visuals the consumer is bombarded by every day is tremendous–in the street, on a laptop, or a smartphone. A visual chaos that makes it hard to navigate into. Impact and, most of all, clarity, have become keywords for all brands. All these bold and neutral logos are telling the consumer the same message: Our brand and our services are simple, straight-forward, and clear. And extremely readable.” –Thierry Brunfaut, creative director and founding partner at Base Design


“I see this as a natural step for brands to take as they grow from scrappy startups into established brands. Your goals have shifted from making noise and standing out to being a trusted, dependable part of people’s everyday lives. That heartfelt personality and idiosyncrasy that defined you as you started out, and won over your early adopters, can be a limitation as you aim for broad appeal (and bigger revenue).

“There is an equal danger that we think brand equals color/type/logo, but this avoids the world that brands are now thriving in. More established tech brands deliver their personality through their service, their content, their voice, the way they sound and behave. They can afford to make their personality more present and alive than a startup with one app or one site can ever be–viewed like this, the friendly corporate typefaces of the world aren’t much of an issue.” –Andy Harvey, creative director at Moving Brands


“People at the head of these powerful digital brands, as any strong brand, know very well they are not defined by their logo anymore but by the product or service they provide. They are strong, thanks to what they allow you to do with them. Before, logo designers would look for a ‘concept’ when designing a logo. That is obviously not needed anymore: The brand is the concept. Their logos may look similar, but what they offer is totally different and effective, and that’s what finally counts for the consumer. They are 100% recognizable.

“These brands are now so good at what they do and so widely used they have become part of our everyday life and culture. That’s why they do not need logos anymore, as they become words (or even better, verbs) in our daily language. Sayings like “I will just google this” is the best example. Becoming words, these brands will be articulated in sentences and texts more and more. To reinforce that, most of those brands now spend on designing custom typefaces instead of logos: a custom typeface becoming their recognizable voice on every platform or device.” –Thierry Brunfaut, creative director and founding partner at Base Design

“I think another trend right now is that the logo is not doing all the work. It’s doing a lot less work in terms of defining the identity. So much of the identity now is defined by a lot of elements and experiences that surround the logo, that are supporting it. My metaphor is, think about the logo as the keystone in the bridge. It’s central but there’s a whole bunch of other things around it that keep that bridge intact and get you from one side of the river to another. It has to fit with a lot of other component parts.” –Howard Belk, co-CEO and chief creative officer at Siegel+Gale


“Since the great rejection of skeuomorphism in 2007, the tech sector has been endlessly repeating the same ‘flat’ design style chiefly because we don’t need metaphors in UX like we did in the early days of popular tech, and because it just works faster and better on small-screen smartphones. Tech typography has been influenced by this to such an extent that it’s all becoming quite stale and straight-out-of-the-box predictable. But it’s no different to many other categories where visual codes become so entrenched, to see anything else would invite rejection.

“I think if you look across many categories (but not all) you can see the same thing happening. Perhaps not with exactly the same fonts, but certainly a category style. For example, if you look at luxury brands they can be very conformist, as can categories like Scottish whiskey or pain relief. They all have their familiar codes, tropes, and clichés.

“So we’re probably stuck with it for a while yet, until someone blows it all up again. And to that I say, bring it on.” –Nick Clark, executive creative director at Superunion New York

Penguin modern series

Penguin Books launches its new Penguin Modern series of editions retailing at £1 each. Echoing its Little Black Books range of 2015, the new covers again rely on a typographic treatment – this time showing off the inventiveness of Avant GardeThe Penguin Modern series launches on February 22. Editions will retail at £1 each. See penguinmodern.com

Does dose organic juice

 Akufen Atelier Créatif has “hipsterized” Dose’s line of organic juices. Bottled in clear plastic, each beverage is titled in bold graphic type according to its color. The design is minimal, catering to the trending market for juicing. With the play on words, inspired by abbreviated text messages, Dose targets a more youthful audience. 

“Dose is a Montreal based organic / raw juice company that makes delicious healthy juices every morning and then delivers them to your work place ! We created a brand and package that is as simple and colorful as the products themselves.”

Introducing TCCC Unity

TCCCUnity.jpgThe Coca-Cola Company has been around for over a century, but they just experienced a first: Brody Associates unveiled a bespoke typeface inspired by the brand itself. The typeface—called TCCC Unity, which stands for The Coca-Cola Company Unity—is described by vice president of global design, James Sommerville, as “encapsulating elements from Coca-Cola’s past and its American Modernist heritage.”

Brody Associates produced a variety of weights and styles, giving it maximum flexibility to be used, to grow, and to evolve. It feels modern and versatile—easily able to roll out in all touchpoints. There’s also an app, TCCC Unity, in which the creators tell how the typeface’s personality came from the company’s visual heritage. It offers a unique peek at the process for creating it and even includes a selection from Coca-Cola’s archives to show what was used for inspiration.

University of Bergen rebrand

The mark took the whole (rather long and unwieldy) name of the institution and, in its most extreme form, compressed it together to form a jumble of letters that nonetheless was distinctive and memorable. In other executions, however, the name extended into a more immediately readable form.

Uniform‘s identity for the Fakultet for kunst, musikk og design, UiB at the University of Bergen.

12 day of Chocolate: A Designer Collection

Now this is something I want for Christmas?


Every year Chase Design Group creates a holiday gift to share with clients. For 2013, they hit upon the idea of doing a chocolate gift. A humorous riff on the “12 Days of Christmas” seemed like the perfect way to feature Chase’s inventive design and Clear Image’s outstanding printing.

Each wrapper features a different aspect of the design process from frayed nerves to a perfect proof. Every designer at Chase got a chance to design their own wrapper both inside and out (please view below each individual design credits). Each design uniquely conveys the hectic and often humorous experience of working as a designer.1_7_13_12DaysofChocolate_2.jpg1_7_13_12DaysofChocolate_5.jpg1_7_13_12DaysofChocolate_9.jpg

This is me, Full Stop.

Written by Here Design’s Philip Cowell and designed by the studio’s co-founder Caz Hildebrand, This Is Me, Full Stop gives voice to 12 everyday punctuation marks and has them explain the jobs they do in helping us to communicate. 

Alongside the writing, the marks are used illustratively across most of the pages, while at other times they form the basis for a range of patterns and designs using a wide variety of typefaces (these are listed at the end of the book).

Despite its sparse text, the book also manages to cover a bit of grammatical history, too: from the Ancient Greeks’ aobve-the-line use of the full stop, for example, to the theory that it was a monk who designed the first question mark after copying the shape of a cat’s tail.

This Is Me, Full Stop is a fun celebration of how a handful of little marks have been helping us to communicate with each other for hundreds of years – and a reminder that each one is a beguiling piece of design in its own right.