Tag Archives: Typography

Hand Sanitiser ads

Thanks to coronavirus, a new creative category is on the rise – hand sanitiser advertising. As more and more of us stash bottles in our bags, brands are going to be under increasing pressure to get noticed in a crowded category. So it makes sense that both Dettol and Lifebuoy have invested in major ad campaigns, but it’s interesting to note the different directions each has taken.

Lifebuoy’s Bish, Bash, Bosh campaign , which comprises a flm and outdoor ads with illustrations by Dan Woodger.

It’s fun, and God knows we all need some of that after months of frightening news and warning notices about social distancing. Making hand sanitiser playful and engaging must have been a tough brief, but Mullenlowe and Woodger have pulled it off in impressive fashion.

The illustrations are punchy, and work as well as static outdoor ads as they do in a gross-out animation that reminds us why we all need sanitiser in the first place.

The Body Coach

Joe Wicks became the nation’s PE teacher during those early months of national lockdown. And as a second lockdown descended upon England last month, again Wicks was there not only with his daily 30 minute PE sessions, but he also released a new YouTube series to get us exercising. The Body Coach brand has carved out a space of unrelenting energy and positivity, and it’s continued to flourish during a time where moving and exercising has, for many, been the only light in a very dark year. 

To help bring the app to life, Nikki enlisted the help of design and tech studio Ustwo and design agency Koto, who’d already worked on the rebrand of the Body Coach earlier in the year. “It was vital the work we did captured [Joe’s] infectious energy, the positivity which makes Joe the success he is,” says creative director and founder of Koto, James Greenfield on the key features of the rebrand. “So we took the bright colours the brand already used and then added a graphic layer built around this, with every element feeling like it moved. From a logo that is active, warm and approachable to a graphic language that utilises ‘hites’ (the active lines used in animation and comics to denote movement) to typography that isn’t just a standard cold typeface.” 

Fuchs says the project was more than the product for them as it was also about establishing a sense of longevity. “We worked to shape a business model and proposition both for now and the future, we created the back-end system for ‘support heroes’ to manage subscriptions and a website to communicate the mission and vision,” she says. “Alongside this we are helping Joe build his digital capability.”  

“I love some of the features in the app, but for me the design has been so important in making this product feel fun and accessible,” says Nikki. “The rebrand work that Koto did for us really captured Joe’s energy perfectly, and Ustwo has done such an incredible job of bringing it all to life in the digital experience. We can’t wait to share it with the world.”  

Pentagram identity for a new craft platform

Maker Mile by Pentagram

Astrid Stavro’s team at Pentagram have unveiled the new typographic identity created for Maker Mile, which launched as part of Venice Design Week 2020. The new platform (not to be confused with the east London initiative of the same name) aims to promote the tradition and development of craft in the platform’s home city of Venice, with subsequent editions set to spotlight cities around the world.

Although the identity appears simplistic at first glance, the execution is quietly playful. The horizontal bar of the L is dramatically elongated, cleverly containing linear detailing within the wordmark itself that stretches along posters, signage, book spines and even adds an enticing spin to wayfinding.

The concept is brought to life in animations, where the L is stretched out like a tape measure, shunting the E along to the edge of the image. Another variation sees the horizontal bar form the outline of various objects that allude to the platform’s spirit of all things craft.

Expanding the wordmark evokes the idea of forward-thinking direction, while also creating the sense that, like a physical strip or ‘mile’ in many cities around the world, the platform is a destination worth visiting.

Maker Mile posters

New Identity for wine connoisseurs SommSelect

While the world of wine, and particular sommeliers, has traditionally been characterised by stuffiness and exclusivity, SommSelect is making it more accessible via its subscription service and an ever-evolving online wine shop.

The rebrand comes off the back of huge growth amid the pandemic and the forced closure of bars and restaurants, with SommSelect’s wine club subscriptions up by 300% in the last six months alone.

Saks brought in Deva Pardue, formerly of Pentagram and The Wing, to lead the rebrand and draw in a new generation of more adventurous wine drinkers.

The refreshed visual identity nods to the sophistication of the sommelier experience, while also looking to elevate it to a more modern and approachable place.

A new logomark leverages the prominence of the letter ‘S’ in the company’s name to create an elegant, corkscrew-like letterform.

The wordmark is based on a customised version of the primary brand typeface, Canela by Commercial Type.

Virgin Money rebrand

There has been a movement among traditional financial institutions to adopt a more human persona in recent years – largely thanks to younger, cooler challenger banks like Monzoand Starling snapping at their heels.

Virgin Money approached Pentagram’s Luke Powell, Jody Hudson-Powell and Domenic Lippa to create a fresh look to go with its new proposition, as a brand that shares Virgin’s core values but happens to be in banking, as opposed to a financial brand that happens to be part of Virgin.

The new identity looks to move the brand firmly away from the often faceless, corporate look favoured by many financial services companies, and reflect a customer-focused approach to banking.

The design team created a bespoke mono-linear wordmark, with the wider Virgin Money headline font family being built from this geometric logo.

“The overall construction is a balance of geometric curves, nuanced humanist forms, and hard edges and angles, creating a visual form that references Virgin Money’s functional and pragmatic side while embodying its people-centred approach,” says Pentagram.

The instantly recognisable Virgin red is used as the brand’s primary colour, alongside a secondary colour palette of bright blue, purple and white.

A new book is celebrating Norman Ives’ deconstructed designs

Ives experimented with forms, techniques and materials ranging from painting and silk screen prints to murals, sculpture and bas-reliefs. His personal work also encompassed fascinating collage work, and he was a “graphic pioneer” of layering according to Heller.

Ives died in 1978 before the “the wall separating applied from pure art disciplines” had “cracked and shattered in as many places as they have today”, according to Steven Heller, who writes the book’s foreword. He believes that, had Ives lived longer into the 80s and 90s, his work may have been recognised more so along the lines of well-known artists whose practice is closely linked to type and lettering such as Barbara Kruger.

Among Ives’ commercial graphic design work featured in the book are various creations that demonstrate his curious eye for slotting letterforms into complex geometric forms, whether his labyrinthine logomark for BT: Bank, or a densely layered cover design for AIGA journal in the early 70s.

The book’s section on graphic design opens with an excerpt from an essay written by Ives himself in a 1960 volume of Industrial Design journal, where he muses on the limitations imposed on graphic designers, saying that these pave the way for ingenuity: “Restrictions are present wherever products are mass-produced – and they are necessary and desirable. It takes an ingenious and dedicated designer to overcome them or use them to advantage”.

Norman Ives: Constructions and Reconstructions is published by PowerHouse Books, priced $65; powerhousebooks.com

Wayfinding in Moscow’s Gorky Park

Gorky Park Moscow

The park recently accumulated more grounds to include the Muzeon Park of Arts, Neskuchny Garden and the green hills of Vorobyovy Gory. However many visitors weren’t exploring beyond the original confines of the Gorky Park grounds, so Russian design firm Art Lebedev Studio was brought in to help visitors expand their horizons and discover what else Gorky Park has to offer.

Gorky Park wayfinding

The signage serves a more practical function during the day. By night, however, the signs transform into art objects thanks to backlighting, which showcases eye-catching graphics, animations, moving image works and even film clips, making for a surprising twist that demonstrates how form and function can coexist in harmony.

Australian Centre for the Moving Image rebrand

As the Australian Centre for the Moving Image enters a new era, the museum has revealed a fresh look created by design studio North.

When the museum reopens in early 2021, it will have a fresh look devised by UK design agency North, which will complete ACMI’s transformation from its beginnings as a local film centre in the 1940s to the most visited museum of its kind.

ACMI branding by North

At the heart of the identity is a distinctive new wordmark, which is squared off at the edges for an impactful boxy effect that lends itself well to a grid system. The ‘m’ subtly calls to mind the shape of a video cassette, and makes for a far more memorable logotype than its somewhat corporate predecessor. A new typeface, Px Grotesk, has also been introduced to the suite to be used across all touchpoints.

North worked closely with ACMI’s in-house design team on the identity, which features a streamlined colour palette that enhances the vibrant imagery used across the museum’s cultural programme. The update comes with revamped signage, merchandise and campaign assets, as well as a new website created by Liquorice and internal wayfinding by Büro North.

Hylo sports branding

London agency Otherway has designed the branding, which is intended to live between the worlds of sport and sustainability. It’s noticeably minimalist, sporting a sans serif logo and accompanying typeface, and a bolt-shaped motif that Otherway says represents the power of nature, as well as the speed and lightness of Hylo’s first shoe.

“We had conversations early on about colour or detailing, especially around branding,” Otherway founder Jono Holt. “To get that pop of colour we’d have to use an artificial dye. That extra piece of detailing needs a different supply chain. They ended up being stripped back because the design has to be simple for the supply chain to be simple, for the sustainability and responsibility of the product.”