Tag Archives: Typography

Bella Vida

After years of struggling with cystic acne, founder and CEO Erin Schmidt of luxury skincare line Bella Vida Santa Barbara decided to craft a line of products like cleansers and serums that could naturally help acne sufferers. Bella Vida means “Beautiful Life,” and on the company’s website, they tout that their passion is to help everyone feel beautiful and love themselves, a lofty goal that the cosmetic industry often ironically misses.

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The font-focused logo for Bella Vida Santa Barbara went through three rounds of designs in-house by Schmidt, who was inspired by luxury designers Chanel, Gucci, Yves St. Laurent and Christian Dior. Schmidt tried several fonts she had on hand and went to a group of fellow entrepreneurs for feedback.Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Teach First rebrand

The charity has ditched its “corporate” identity in favour of an all-encompassing rebrand that reflects its mission to create fair education for all.

The update was almost two years in the making, and required Teach First to “take a hard look at their brand”, says Johnson Banks. The charity wanted to move away from its previous style and embrace something bolder that would reflect its focus on tackling inequality and helping children reach their potential, while also conveying a “grittier, more direct tone of voice”.

The studio says the refreshed identity also needed communicate with a “bewildering array” of people, from graduates, teachers and headmasters to people considering changing career as well as government departments and corporate sponsors.

Let’s get talking again

A new ITV print campaign, created by Uncommon, continues a campaign that asks us all to tune back in – but to our own living rooms instead of the TV.

The ads remind readers of the value of stopping to check in on someone, ask how they are, and take a moment to have a chat – even if this means pausing the football to do so. It’s surprising to see a broadcaster encouraging viewers to take their eyes off the TV, but it’s all part of ITV’s Britain Get Talking initiative, which hopes to persuade people to communicate more and improve their mental wellbeing. It follows on from a series of TV adverts showing well-known ITV presenters offering a moment of quiet, in which viewers can turn to one another and chat instead.

Jake Newbury

Jake Newbury’s interests are broad, though it’s clear he’s naturally inclined towards underground scenes. Having recently graduated from the Design for Publishing course at Norwich University of the Arts – where he specialised in editorial design and illustration – the designer has created eye-catching spreads based on streetwear brands like Carhartt WIP and Stone Island, as well as experimental producer Aphex Twin.

Newbury’s penchant for distressed visuals comes through in these projects, but his wider portfolio demonstrates an eye for sleeker styles.

Hope is power

Creative agency Uncommon worked with the Guardian on its first brand campaign in seven years, which aims to highlight its reporting as a positive force for change.

The ad campaign centres around a butterfly, a symbol of both freedom and transformation. Bold, bright and stark, the posters place the focus on words and language, in an attempt to reinforce the sense of clarity and transparency that the Guardian aims to provide. Meanwhile, phrases like ‘Confused? Overwhelmed? Misled? That’s how they want you’, demonstrate an inevitably political slant, referencing other media outlets as well as politicians.

The butterfly allegory is brought to life in the accompanying campaign film by James Marsh, the Oscar-winning director behind The Theory of Everything. Here, the butterfly tirelessly bangs against a glass window in an attempt to escape to the outside world. As the lyrics of Anais Mitchell’s Nothing Changes solemnly sound out, the butterfly eventually bursts through the glass, where it joins a legion of others in freedom.

Anthony Burrill shows support for Extinction Rebellion

The designer has created a series of posters and graphics to support XR’s protests in central London, also joining supporters at a live printing workshop in Trafalgar Square.

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Designer Anthony Burrill has created a series of graphics and slogans to support this week’s action. He has also joined in with the protests, taking part in a live print workshop at Trafalgar Square on Wednesday.

His designs aim to encourage others to think about their own carbon footprint and the steps they can take to reduce their impact on the environment. “I was thinking about change and those small changes we can make to our lives that have a bigger effect when we all do them,” he explains.

With his use of bold type and bright colours, Burrill’s aesthetic feels like a natural fit with Extinction Rebellion’s visual identity. The group has become known for its striking graphics, posters and props, which draw inspiration from protest movements of the 50s and 60s.

Athru new identity by JKR’s

After a difficult few decades, it seems Irish whiskey is having a moment. The number of distilleries in the country has grown from four to 24 in the past six years and sales are booming: Over 10.5 million cases were sold in 2018 (the highest figure since the pre-Prohibition era) and over 900,000 people visited distilleries for tours and tasting sessions.

One of the latest arrivals on the scene is Athru: a premium brand founded by Irish entrepreneur David Raethorne, who has spent the past five years turning a former video tape factory in Sligo into the Lough Gill Distillery.

JKR worked closely with Raethorne and his team to create the Athru brand. As the project is a long-term endeavour, JKR took inspiration from the idea of “an unfinished picture”, cutting the corners off letters and splicing together images of the local landscape.
It’s a striking approach – and one that stands out among a sea of brands using scripted typefaces and vintage logos. Sean Thomas, Creative Director at JKR, says the agency wanted to create something unique and looked to art galleries, museums and disruptor brands such as Aesop instead of Athru’s rivals for inspiration.

Gaddum rebrand

True North has stripped back Gaddum’s branding to the bare bones, basing the charity’s new tone and identity on the idea of a supportive friend.

Despite being one of the oldest charities operating in the Greater Manchester area, The Gaddum Centre’s rebrand is anything but traditional.

Established in 1833, the charity provides health and wellbeing support to the local people, primarily dealing with therapy, advocacy and advisory services.

The new branding, conceived by Manchester-based agency True North, resembles the simplistic, type-based design that currently prevails in tech start-ups. Here, it aims to give Gaddum a friendly, approachable demeanour, reflected in both its clean aesthetic and the choice of pastel hues.