Tag Archives: Advertising

Sephora power of beauty

French beauty chain Sephora has launched a new campaign called The Unlimited Power of Beauty, which signifies a shift in its brand positioning. “The Unlimited Power of Beauty is a new, powerful campaign that is deliberately different from previous years,” explains Olivier Vigneaux, the CEO for BETC Digital. “It is both universal in its casting and intimate in its tone and imagery, allowing viewers to see themselves in the story and discover the potential of their own beauty.”

The three-minute ad, directed by German creative Jonas Lindstroem, tells the story of a woman’s relationship with her reflection throughout her life. Tender and intimate, we follow the lead character from childhood to adulthood and are taken through relatable moments of both doubt and strength.

From experimenting with vivid makeup as a young girl to using it as an adult as a confidence boost after a hard day, the ad aims to highlight how the same person can explore the many facets of beauty in a lifetime, and even in just one day.

The campaign signifies a more grounded approach to the way we use makeup and beauty products, taking us away from the more theatrical. It acknowledges the ways in which beauty has evolved, going beyond catwalks and magazines, and how it can now be presented to us through friends’ selfies or uploads from influencers.

 

Minimalism McDonald’s

It can be risky to go minimalist in an ad campaign: what if your audience miss the point entirely and don’t realise who the ad is for? Yet McDonald’s has created a series of outdoor ads in recent years that have boldly expressed just how deeply the fast food brand is embedded in our collective consciousness.

Joining these are a new series of posters from Leo Burnett for McDonald’s UK, which abandon photographs of juicy burgers or crisp fries and instead simply opt for words. Surely an ad creative’s delight to work on, the posters prove that we need no more than text to get us feeling peckish. The campaign was created in collaboration with renowned typographer David Schwen, and clearly hark back to Schwen’s earlier series titled Type Sandwiches.

National Trust 125th anniversary ad

Credits:
Agency: Wieden+Kennedy London
Creative Director: Flo Heiss
Creatives: Derek Lui, Harry Ingrams
Executive Creative Directors: Tony Davidson, Iain Tait
Production Company: All Mighty Pictures
Director/DOP: Anthony Dickenson
Executive Producer/Creative Director: Mark Harbour
Design Director: Karen Jane
Lead Designer: Alex Thursby- Pelham
Designer: Xueling Wang

VW waves goodbye to the Beetle

The spot, titled The Last Mile, is created by ad agency Johannes Leonardo and set to a version of Let It Be by The Beatles sung by a children’s choir. It is bathed in nostalgia for the Beetle, with references to its place in pop culture history included throughout.

It might seem odd for a brand to put so much emphasis on a product that is no longer available to buy, but the release of the ad forms part of an ongoing marketing push by VW to move on from the global diesel emissions scandal that severely damaged its reputation in 2015.

The new ad follows a previous campaign that aims to highlight its move into electric vehicles. As with The Last Mile, those ads also leverage the brand’s glorious past.

Electric vehicles are not mentioned explicitly in the Beetle spot though there is a lengthy scene that references environmentalism via wind power and the closing tagline – ‘Where one road ends, another begins’ – is an attempt to look to the future. The hope is clearly that the big love for Volkswagen that the world once had can be used to redeem its standing with consumers and allow both the brand – as well as its products – to move on from its difficult last few years.

Credits:
Agency: Johannes Leonardo
Production company: Nexus Studios
Director: Fx Goby

OKCupid

The dating app’s ads highlight the issues that matter most to its users – and tell us it’s OK to choose partners based on their political views.

OKCupid’s Ask Yourself campaign tackles the subject head on, with a series of ads that tell us it’s OK to select partners based on their political leanings, their attitudes towards gender or even their views on abortion. Outdoor posters feature lines such as ‘It’s OK not to date a man who won’t vote for a woman’ and ‘It’s OK to choose to only date someone who’s pro-choice’.

Featuring artwork by Xaviera López, it was created by Mekanism and follows Wieden+Kennedy’s witty DTF ads, which offered some surprising new takes on an acronym that has become ubiquitous on dating apps.

Boots Christmas Campaign

Themed ‘Bootiques’ will be popping up across the UK to help you make the right purchase for your loved one, whether it’s the moody tweenager or the person who loves working out almost as much as they love talking about working out.

In a welcome departure from its more sentimental efforts from the last couple of years, the retailer is going big on experiential this time around, launching hundreds of pop-up Bootiques (geddit?) both in-store and online, which are themed around the personalities of its tricky-to-buy-for customers.

A number of these personalities are the focal point of an accompanying campaign film created by WPP’s Team WBA, which includes Ogilvy UK, Mediacom, Geometry and Bookmark, who have also worked with True Story.

Agencies: Ogilvy UK, Mediacom, Geometry, Bookmark
CCO: Dede Laurentino
Creative Consultant: Dan Fisher
Chief ECD: Jules Chalkley
ECD: Sam Cartmell
Experiential ECD – Elspeth Lynn
Creatives: Tom Madden & Morgan Hinds–Shorland, Naomi Nicholl & Lily James, Tony Malcolm & Marc Bennett
Design Director: Sian Hughes
Design: Taylor Bates, Rob Hare
Production Company: Academy
Director: Si&Ad

Apple’s Christmas ad is a festive tearjerker

It’s not often advertising is genuinely moving but The Surprise really tugs at the heartstrings, and you could be forgiven if you well up slightly watching it. The background music, borrowed from the equally heart-wrenching film Up, only adds to the emotion.

The ad – which was created by Apple’s agency TBWA\Media Arts Lab, and directed by Mark Molloy – isn’t the first time the tech giant has shown a more relatable side to phones and tablets.