Tag Archives: Advertising

Ikea sleep ads

The posters follow the brand’s recent ad, which provided a prequel to the classic tale of the tortoise and the hare, and continue its message of the value of a good night’s sleep

Credits:
Creative: Mother
Production company: The Miss Jones Agency
Photographer: Amy Currell
Stylist: Amy Friend
Modelmaking: Andy Knight Ltd

McDonald’s ad for Moving Day

Moving house is hard work, with one of the main goals being the moment when you’ve finally got inside your new property and can enjoy a takeaway meal to celebrate. This will be a familiar feeling the world over, but is particularly pertinent in Quebec, Canada, where traditionally most residential leases come to an end on the same day, July 1.

This means an average of over 100K households in the province pack their belongings and move into their new homes on what Quebecers refer to as ‘Moving Day’. Tapping into this event was a recent campaign from McDonald’s Canada, created by Cossette ad agency, which repurposes the contents of moving vans to look like McDonald’s meals, which can be ordered via McDelivery.

The posters also aim to tell different Moving Day stories, which helped define the objects that were featured: The fries execution was inspired by a young man moving into his first apartment in a trendy Montreal neighborhood; the Big Mac execution featured a family with kids moving into a suburban home; and the Egg McMuffin spot highlighted a young couple moving into their first home.

Witty Snickers ad

Snickers is the latest brand to release an ad that would have made zero sense to us a year ago, but is likely to raise a much needed grin in our weird new existence.

The spot highlights some of the habits we might have got into in our Zoom-heavy set up, and why it pays to be cautious as we emerge blinking into a more social world again.

Credits:
Agency: BBDO New York
CCO: David Lubars
ECDs: Gianfranco Arena, Peter Kain
Creative directors: Scott Mahoney, Dan Oliva
Production company: O Positive
Director: Jess Coulter

BECO Steal our staff

Having staff poached is typically a brand’s worst nightmare, yet toiletries brand Beco welcomed it with open arms in its provocative #StealOurStaff campaign.

The campaign was created by TBWA\London, which had already been working with Beco on getting its products stocked in leading retailers such as Boots, Waitrose and Sainsbury’s. The brand includes organic, paraben-free and plastic-free toiletries in its range, but it is the people that make Beco what it is. With 80% of its workforce disabled, disadvantaged or visually impaired, the social enterprise is gunning for change when it comes to the disability employment gap sustained by the biased hiring practices of many businesses. It’s a widespread issue that seems missing from wider discourse, which is what #StealOurStaff set out to change.

At the heart of the project’s concept was its packaging design, which features CVs of Beco employees. “It’s like an upside-down recruitment campaign,” TBWA\London chief creative officer Andy Jex says. The packaging takeover was joined by tweets sent to business leaders, a website-turned-recruitment portal that also contained advice for employers interested in hiring people with disabilities, and an accompanying spot on Channel 4. Made in collaboration with production company Hoi Polloi, the film stars real Beco employees contradicting the less-than-adequate audio description (AD) voiceover.

The film concept emerged from encounters with Beco staff working at the factory – particularly one team member who ridiculed Netflix’s questionable AD. It soon evolved into a tongue-in-cheek testament to the fact that people with disabilities are not short on humour. The aim was to be more lighthearted and less worthy, with the approach highlighting just how misleading media representations of disabled people can be – “particularly in advertising”, Jex notes.

Love Wellness redesign

So Bosworth decided to consult the experts and invent a better approach—and in 2016 she launched Love Wellness, a line of curated body-positive health products for women.

The brand has had a couple different identities over the years, but hit its stride with its latest look, created by Lobster Phone and released this spring.

The San Francisco–based design firm delivered a new identity, website, packaging and creative strategy.

As Lobster Phone writes, “Inspiration for the logo was found in a late 1930s Art Deco type specimen; it felt playful, chunky and expressive. We used this as the basis for creating custom letterforms that are both clear and iconic. As illustrations are foundational to the larger brand, we made the ‘V’ of the logo into a face with lips that kiss and talk. Each product has its own quirky name, corresponding illustration and color combination that provide a not-so off-the-shelf look. The illustrations play off the style of the logo’s lips—an almost Japanese pop aesthetic—clearly demonstrating the benefits of the product in a dynamic way.”

Love_GoodToGlow.jpgLove_PackagingLineup.jpgLove_BizCards.jpgLove_WildPosting.jpg

Pentagram uplifting brand for mental health

Created by Paula Scher and her team, the identity focuses on a ‘square peg in a round hole’ icon that signifies there is no normal when it comes to mental health.

“Cole’s hope was that everyone sometimes has emotional issues and that everyone needs to be able to feel like it’s OK to feel that way and to talk about it and get help if they need it,” Scher explains. “I equated that feeling of not being emotionally stable to feeling like a square peg in a round hole. I wanted to create a symbol and system that could be universally recognised and take away the sanitarium aspect of mental health.”

The icon illustrates that there is no ‘normal’ when it comes to mental health and that everyone fits despite how it might feel. Set in the typeface Druk by Commercial Type, the chunky black letterforms are set against a rainbow of colours, which has been applied to business cards, stationery, the website and a set of posters which feature powerful phrases.

The Druk typeface is used again here to signal its connection to the Coalition. Likewise a bright but slightly more varied colour palette has been applied to represent the broad spectrum of mental health conditions, while also capturing a sense of optimism and hope.

For Scher, she felt it was her and her team’s responsibility to create an engaging but safe space. “I think the graphics have to be powerful and accessible, not timid or sedate, and allow people to feel like it’s OK to come into the site and participate,” she says.

These days will pass

The Your Space Or Mine project gives artists and creatives a platform on the street, and Titchner’s colourful, typographic piece, titled Please Believe These Days Will Pass, is a “rallying cry for hope” and a bid to boost morale. With many of us still only leaving the house for essential food shops and daily exercise, the piece aims to be a welcome break from the “monotony of our current situation”.

“When the words ‘Please Believe These Days Will Pass’ first came to me in 2012 who could imagine the ‘days’ that we find ourselves in now? My thinking at the time was a message to help one endure through difficult times, but also a reminder to cherish what is good in the here and now,” explains Titchner. “It’s what is good, such as the bravery of those working so hard on our behalf in the NHS or the safety of our loved ones, that will get us through when the endurance runs low. I’m very thankful of the opportunity to share these words again in sites across the UK and hope as we all do these days will pass before too long.”

Burger King quarantine whooper

Yet Burger King France has given it a go with its Le Whopper de la Quarantaine poster campaign, aka the Quarantine Whopper, which shows a poster of neatly organised, shop-bought ingredients that fans can use to imitate BK’s Whopper at home. While it doesn’t reveal how to cook and put all of these ingredients together, the image-focused ad is a nod of solidarity to the country, which has been under lockdown since March 17.

Created by Paris ad agency Buzzman, the ad was tweeted out on Burger King France’s official channeland received a wave of support and recreations with nearly 4,000 retweets and over 17,000 likes at the time of writing. As part of the campaign, Buzzman has also created similar iterations for its Le Steakhouse, Le Big Fish, and Le Big King burgers.

Can mouldy food sell food?

In a bid to emphasise its fresh food credentials, Burger King is showing the world exactly what happens when a Whopper is left to age for over a month.Moldy Burger King ad

Between the growing market for vegan, unprocessed or organic foods and the increased backlash in the face of the obesity crisis, it’s safe to say fast food chains are facing an uphill battle. While brands in this space have shown inventive responses to such quandaries, Burger King US has taken an unexpected punt at demonstrating its credentials as a producer of ‘real’ food. The move comes as the chain begins to remove preservatives from its recipes, apparently steering away from the additive-laden products most have come to expect from burger chains.

Built around the tagline ‘The beauty of no artificial preservatives’, the new campaign centres on a time lapse that begins with a meticulously assembled Whopper burger, staged M&S-style against a dramatic black backdrop. Before long, however, we see what happens to the burger as the days and weeks go by – insert mould, fluff and all manners of scuzz – to the tune of Aretha Franklin’s What A Difference A Day Makes.

The accompanying print ads follow a similar format, capturing the state of the Whopper on different days late into the decomposing process. The campaign was the creation of three agencies – David Miami, Publicis, and INGO Stockholm.

An image of a moldy burgerAn image from Burger King's new ad campaign

LSO Campaign

Superunion has been working with LSO since 2017, when it launched a new brand identity for the orchestra inspired by the movement of conductor Sir Simon Rattle’s baton. Previous campaigns have featured CG artwork based on Rattle’s hand gestures, but for LSO’s 2020/21 season, Superunion opted for a different approach, teaming up with Found Studio and dancer Ella Robson Guilfoyle to create a dramatic live-action dance film.

The campaign takes inspiration from the theme of LSO’s upcoming programme, ‘Dancing on the edge of a volcano’, which will see the orchestra perform work created in Europe in the first half of the 20th century. According to Rattle, the phrase was used by Austrian composer Alban Berg to describe the atmosphere in 1930s Germany and captures the mood of an era that produced “some of the darkest music possible”.

For the first shoot, Superunion filmed Robson Guilfoyle performing a series of short dance sequences based on Rattle’s movements (which were recorded using motion capture) while wearing colourful clothing. Footage was captured from above at 50 frames per second using 5K cameras. Guilfoyle then performed a series of movements with flares, sparkles, smoke grenades and chalk dust, which was filmed at 100 frames per second.