Tag Archives: Advertising

McDonald’s ads promote home delivery service

The posters are the latest in a long running series of ads from McDonald’s that have taken a simple, minimalist approach, making clever visual use of its iconic branding or its products to send a message to its audience.

In this set of images, one half of the golden arches logo is shown beaming into homes, with the simple statement ‘We Deliver’ below. The houses featured include a range of architectural styles from modern tower blocks to a Victorian terraced house.

The new campaign appears the week that a rebrand of McDonald’s’ packaging was released, which also uses a simple, illustrative approach. Both the rebrand and these minimalist ads reveal a confidence in just how well known its branding is to both its regular customers and the wider world, and that McDonald’s is not afraid to use these assets in a powerful and striking way.

Credits:
Agency: Leo Burnett London
CCO: Chaka Sobhani
ECD: Mark Elwood
Creative directors: Andrew Long, James Millers
Creatives: Andrew Long, James Millers, Will Rees
Designer: Sam Kallen

Hand Sanitiser ads

Thanks to coronavirus, a new creative category is on the rise – hand sanitiser advertising. As more and more of us stash bottles in our bags, brands are going to be under increasing pressure to get noticed in a crowded category. So it makes sense that both Dettol and Lifebuoy have invested in major ad campaigns, but it’s interesting to note the different directions each has taken.

Lifebuoy’s Bish, Bash, Bosh campaign , which comprises a flm and outdoor ads with illustrations by Dan Woodger.

It’s fun, and God knows we all need some of that after months of frightening news and warning notices about social distancing. Making hand sanitiser playful and engaging must have been a tough brief, but Mullenlowe and Woodger have pulled it off in impressive fashion.

The illustrations are punchy, and work as well as static outdoor ads as they do in a gross-out animation that reminds us why we all need sanitiser in the first place.

Spotify 2020 wrapped campaign

With its annual campaign, Spotify recognises and celebrates the stories from the artists, creators and listeners who helped us make it through this year.

The music industry has been hit especially hard by the pandemic this year, with strings of cancelled gigs, venues struggling to stay open and live performances having to adapt to the virtual world

For 2020, Spotify’s flagship annual Wrapped campaign aims to honour this struggle, and “recognise and celebrate the human stories of the year”. From artists to podcasters, families to frontline workers, plus the playlist creators who’ve beavered away, this year Wrapped is all about gratitude and resilience, with a little bit of its trademark humour thrown in too.

As well as the personal rundowns of most-listened tracks and stats that individual users can tap into, Spotify is splashing the campaign across social and outdoor advertising to find “beauty in the chaos” and say thank you to those who made it happen. The campaign’s visuals include a salute to Cardi B’s “invaluable wisdom and philosophies” for her track WAP with Megan Thee Stallion, as well as billboard placements in artists’ hometowns, like Glasgow where Lewis Capaldi’s Someone You Loved was streamed over 706,000 times. 

Ikea Christmas ad

Traditionally a time of extravagance, more people are beginning to consider the balance between indulgence and wastefulness as they celebrate the festive season.

Ikea Russia is tackling the issue head on this year with its new campaign, as it encourages a more considered approach to Christmas consumption.

Directed by Ilya Naishuller, the film starts out innocently enough with a typical Christmassy scene of a young boy playing in the snow, soundtracked by festive classic Carol of the Bells.

Ikea sleep ads

The posters follow the brand’s recent ad, which provided a prequel to the classic tale of the tortoise and the hare, and continue its message of the value of a good night’s sleep

Credits:
Creative: Mother
Production company: The Miss Jones Agency
Photographer: Amy Currell
Stylist: Amy Friend
Modelmaking: Andy Knight Ltd

McDonald’s ad for Moving Day

Moving house is hard work, with one of the main goals being the moment when you’ve finally got inside your new property and can enjoy a takeaway meal to celebrate. This will be a familiar feeling the world over, but is particularly pertinent in Quebec, Canada, where traditionally most residential leases come to an end on the same day, July 1.

This means an average of over 100K households in the province pack their belongings and move into their new homes on what Quebecers refer to as ‘Moving Day’. Tapping into this event was a recent campaign from McDonald’s Canada, created by Cossette ad agency, which repurposes the contents of moving vans to look like McDonald’s meals, which can be ordered via McDelivery.

The posters also aim to tell different Moving Day stories, which helped define the objects that were featured: The fries execution was inspired by a young man moving into his first apartment in a trendy Montreal neighborhood; the Big Mac execution featured a family with kids moving into a suburban home; and the Egg McMuffin spot highlighted a young couple moving into their first home.

Witty Snickers ad

Snickers is the latest brand to release an ad that would have made zero sense to us a year ago, but is likely to raise a much needed grin in our weird new existence.

The spot highlights some of the habits we might have got into in our Zoom-heavy set up, and why it pays to be cautious as we emerge blinking into a more social world again.

Credits:
Agency: BBDO New York
CCO: David Lubars
ECDs: Gianfranco Arena, Peter Kain
Creative directors: Scott Mahoney, Dan Oliva
Production company: O Positive
Director: Jess Coulter

BECO Steal our staff

Having staff poached is typically a brand’s worst nightmare, yet toiletries brand Beco welcomed it with open arms in its provocative #StealOurStaff campaign.

The campaign was created by TBWA\London, which had already been working with Beco on getting its products stocked in leading retailers such as Boots, Waitrose and Sainsbury’s. The brand includes organic, paraben-free and plastic-free toiletries in its range, but it is the people that make Beco what it is. With 80% of its workforce disabled, disadvantaged or visually impaired, the social enterprise is gunning for change when it comes to the disability employment gap sustained by the biased hiring practices of many businesses. It’s a widespread issue that seems missing from wider discourse, which is what #StealOurStaff set out to change.

At the heart of the project’s concept was its packaging design, which features CVs of Beco employees. “It’s like an upside-down recruitment campaign,” TBWA\London chief creative officer Andy Jex says. The packaging takeover was joined by tweets sent to business leaders, a website-turned-recruitment portal that also contained advice for employers interested in hiring people with disabilities, and an accompanying spot on Channel 4. Made in collaboration with production company Hoi Polloi, the film stars real Beco employees contradicting the less-than-adequate audio description (AD) voiceover.

The film concept emerged from encounters with Beco staff working at the factory – particularly one team member who ridiculed Netflix’s questionable AD. It soon evolved into a tongue-in-cheek testament to the fact that people with disabilities are not short on humour. The aim was to be more lighthearted and less worthy, with the approach highlighting just how misleading media representations of disabled people can be – “particularly in advertising”, Jex notes.

Love Wellness redesign

So Bosworth decided to consult the experts and invent a better approach—and in 2016 she launched Love Wellness, a line of curated body-positive health products for women.

The brand has had a couple different identities over the years, but hit its stride with its latest look, created by Lobster Phone and released this spring.

The San Francisco–based design firm delivered a new identity, website, packaging and creative strategy.

As Lobster Phone writes, “Inspiration for the logo was found in a late 1930s Art Deco type specimen; it felt playful, chunky and expressive. We used this as the basis for creating custom letterforms that are both clear and iconic. As illustrations are foundational to the larger brand, we made the ‘V’ of the logo into a face with lips that kiss and talk. Each product has its own quirky name, corresponding illustration and color combination that provide a not-so off-the-shelf look. The illustrations play off the style of the logo’s lips—an almost Japanese pop aesthetic—clearly demonstrating the benefits of the product in a dynamic way.”

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