Tag Archives: Advertising

B&Q poster campaign

Shot by photographer James Day, who is known for his work for the New York Times, New Yorker and Wallpaper, the new B&Q ads are simple yet beautiful.

Each features a mobile phone with a B&Q product bursting from it, including paint, a roll of wallpaper and a bloom of flowers. The only text accompanying this is the brand’s web address, which alongside the image of the phone is enough to send home the message that you can order all these products digitally.

McDonalds BIN IT

This campaign is Belgium’s take on the theme, created by TBWA, which puts bins centre stage. “We want to make trash bins as popular as the burgers,” says Jeremie Goldwasser, creative director at TBWA.

The campaign, which will run on posters, social and in McDonald’s restaurants across Belgium, puts the spotlight on rubbish bins, bathing them in light and pairing them with witty copy.

“We asked Studio Wauters – McDonald’s’ permanent food photographer – to photograph the trash bins,” continues Goldwasser. “The challenge? Making bins look just as attractive and tempting as their burgers. We then applied the typical copywriting and design expertise to the bins, resulting in appetising design and quirky names such as the Big Bin, the Bin Deluxe and the Bin Royal.”

A tale of two halves

Founded in 1936, electrical appliances brand Morphy Richards has been a staple of many British homes for the best part of 100 years. Yet its brand vision hadn’t necessarily translated as it expanded around the world.

“Morphy Richards is historically a British brand that over the years has grown globally. As this growth happened, the meaning of the brand became inconsistent across markets. From the UK, to China, to Australia, what Morphy Richards stood for became diluted and as a result there was no longer a clear and consistent message,” explains Otherway founder Jono Holt.

Tasked with helping the business “see fundamental change”, Otherway set about identifying the brand’s point of view on the world and making it relevant to a new generation of consumers.

“The new wordmark is designed to capture the positive tension that has always sat at the heart of the business,” Holt explains. “The engineer and the salesman. The right brain and the left brain. The rational and the emotional. This juxtaposition of two personalities is represented in the differentiated fonts but somehow work in harmony.”

As our homes are set to remain a place of both work and play for many people, balancing feeling and functionality seems like a proposition that’s fit for the future.

Moniker rebrands crypto platform Coinbase

San Francisco-based agency Moniker has rebranded cryptocurrency platform Coinbase, aiming to reach a wider audience outside the “crypto crowd”.

Moniker was initially brought in to create a new logo, but it was soon apparent that there was “a larger need and opportunity for the visual identity system”, says Moniker creative director and founder Brent Couchman.

The rebrand was initiated at a time when Coinbase was experiencing massive growth, and according to Couchman, had become “the most trusted and easiest-to-use platform for the cryptoeconomy”, but its former identity didn’t match that position.

Coinbase briefed Moniker to create a new visual identity that would balance “the excitement and energy of this new financial world” while communicating trust and security. “To reach a wider audience, not just the typical crypto crowd, they needed a visual identity that built recognition for the brand but also allowed for a really wide range of expression to speak to new users,” says Couchman.

The designers looked to the idea of wayfinding and transit signage systems for inspiration, since the team’s early conversations had unearthed the idea of Coinbase being a ‘bridge’ between traditional finance and the cryptoeconomy. “This was really the core driver early on and gave us a shared language and set of filters to think about each piece of the identity,” says Couchman. Another key concept behind the new identity was the idea that crypto is no longer a futuristic entity, but something tangible and real that can be used right now. “This also fed into the wayfinding concept, that the system needed to be immediate and grounded — not something too abstract that could potentially get in the way for users who were new to the space,” he adds.

The new icon is instantly recognisable as a ‘C’ and a coin, again conveying simplicity and accessibility. “We didn’t want people to have to work to get it, just like using the product,” says Couchman. The blue colour palette of the previous identity was retained to aid identifiability and the brand’s equity; and Moniker introduced a secondary palette to give the branding more flexibility as it grows into new markets and introduces new sub brands.

Here’s comes the Sun

Created by Base Design, the new campaign for the eyewear brand Ace & Tate puts the emphasis on why you need sunglasses, rather than what they look like.

It’s a bold move for an eyewear business to create an ad campaign featuring absolutely no specs or shades, but the campaign is surprisingly evocative. It features pleasingly unretouched portraits of people screwing up their eyes as they’re caught in a beam of sunlight, accompanied by a simple tagline: Bring on the sun.

Base Design’s partner and ECD Thierry Brunfaut says the posters embrace a “universal feeling” of being dazzled by the sun. According to him, the campaign is the next stage in Ace & Tate’s ‘brand evolution’, as the eight-year-old business faces up to an influx of new competitors.

That’s not to say its personality-free, however. “The visuals speak for themselves; they embody a sunny spirit and cheerful mood,” says Brunfaut. “The brand strikes that ‘Dutch Design’ balance: be thorough and serious about what you do, but stay offbeat.”

And Base Design’s approach seems to be paying off, with the campaign widely praised on social media, and also apparently winning Ace & Tate its second best sales day the weekend after launch.

If Alexa could read minds!

The ad could be read as a more extreme take on our general paranoia that Alexa, and other voice-activated assistants, are constantly listening in on our lives, and harvesting them for commercial opportunities. 

The spot doesn’t really do anything to allay that possibility, instead just ramps it up to the point of ridiculousness, as Alexa is shown revealing Johansson and Jost’s embarrassing inner thoughts. Happily nothing too cringeworthy comes out, of course – instead it’s all light-hearted fun and the spot will no doubt rack up the views online.

Credits:
Agency: Lucky Generals
Production Company: Hungryman LA
Director: Wayne McClammy

Macy’s

Macy’s is synonymous with the Holidays as an average of 50 million people tune in to watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. In addition to the parade, Macy’s delivers a series of Holiday programs across the country to celebrate the season. We worked with Macy’s to develop a promotional campaign with strong illustrations and custom typography that conveys the magic of the season.

“We believe that illustration can be a powerful tool for communicating strong ideas, connectingemotionally with users, and creating an experience that feels truly unique. Our collaboration with Carpenter Collective has proven to do just that.”— Gregory Dibisceglie, Macy’s Senior Creative Manager

From me to you Merry Christmas

Find out more https://carpentercollective.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/CarpenterCollective_MacysHoliday2016_09-877×1024.jpg

BBC Christmas ad

“As we know, all families are unique and in many ways that’s what the BBC’s Christmas film is all about – how we are united by our differences,” says Paul Jordan, ECD at BBC Creative. “The BBC is a unifying theme that runs through the heart of the film, bringing us together, and if you look carefully, you’ll notice it’s always there, like a golden thread of tinsel running right through our Christmas.” 

Credits:
Agency: BBC Creative
ECDs: Paul Jordan, Helen Rhodes
Creative Director: Susan Ayton
Creatives: Jules Middleton, Andy Parkman
Director: James Rouse
Production Company: Outsider

Driving home for Christmas

The ad by Anomaly is inspired by Rea’s journey back home to Middlesborough in 1978 after he got stuck in London on Christmas Eve and his wife drove 250 miles to collect him in their black Mini. The song prompted by this trip is now firmly on the UK’s recurring collection of classic Christmas songs and its words are likely known by everyone in the nation (whether they want to know them or not).

Credits:
Creative Agency: Anomaly
Production Company: Riff-Raff
Director: Ed Morris

Great big Christmas ad

Aldi takes on Dickens’ Christmas Carol, with Kevin the Carrot playing the Spirit of Christmas alongside Ebanana Scrooge. Marcus Rashford does a star turn as Marcus Radishford.

Clearly heavily influenced by John Lewis, this spot features a charming imaginary pet monster, but bears little connection to McDonald’s’ wider branding.

Heavy on the product shots, Lidl still manages to have fun with time travel (and Lidl-themed Christmas jumpers) in this humorous spot.

Amazon picks up on the popular theme of kindness in its cinematic global spot, which is soundtracked by Adele and references the impact of the pandemic on our lives.

Featuring an array of cameos from Little Simz to Jadon Sancho, JD Sports has delivered the coolest Christmas ad by some distance.

Disney tugs on the heartstrings with this animated short which sees a stepdad bonding with his new family at Christmas.