Tag Archives: Advertising

Elf the movie or Asda Christmas ad?

By far my favourite Christmas ad of all time!

Credits:
Creative Agency: Havas London
Chief Creative Officer: Vicki Maguire
Creative Directors: Dan Cole, Andy Garnett
Associate Creative Directors: Rob Greaves, Sam Daly
Senior Art Director: Richard Gorton-Lee (Chunky)
Senior Copywriter: Mark Wilson
Senior Designer: Sam Kallen
Production Company: Rattling Stick
Director: Daniel Kleinman
Post production and VFX: Framestore
Creative Director: Kamen Markov
VFX Supervisor: Jules Janaud

TK Maxx Christmas ad

The Christmas campaign season is playing out differently this year. Ads are arriving earlier to avoid media clashes with the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, which starts late November. And of course, there’s the small matter of a cost-of-living crisis to contend with.

The message here is fun, from the soundtrack – Cerrone’s 1977 disco classic Supernature – to the colourful setting of the ad, which was filmed in Poland. It seems to strike the right tone for TK Maxx, whose USP is all about surprising finds at low prices, and steers clear of the worthiness we’re bound to see this year.

Credits:
Agency: Wieden+Kennedy London
ECD: Susan Hoffman
Creative directors: Paddy Treacy, Hannah Smit
Creatives: Georgina Brisby, Marcelo Duarte
Director: Max Siedentopf
Production company: Riff Raff

British Airways’ new campaign celebrates the myriad reasons we travel

The campaign, entitled A British Original, plays on the ‘what is the purpose of your visit?’ question travellers face on landing, delving into the stories that lie behind such a deceptively simple statement.

The ads themselves are extremely minimal in design, making the copywriting the star of the show. Uncommon has written 500 individual lines for the campaign, which range from the mundane – ‘Because this weather sucks’ – to the moving – ‘I’ve had a ring in my pocket for long enough’.

According to Lucy Jameson, co-founder of Uncommon Creative Studio, it’s part of a move to focus on people instead of planes, in particular “British originality”. The airline is also currently working on a new safety video starring BA staff as well as some famous British faces.

Ikea Norway promises to buy back unwanted furniture 

Following the Trash Collection 2021, a campaign and initiative that spotlighted Ikea furniture which had been salvaged from the rubbish and re-sold at its second-hand stores, the Swedish retailer has announced the launch of the Life Collection 2022.

In a similar spirit to last year’s initiative, this one attempts to save and repurpose old furniture that is no longer needed. However, this time around, the furniture is not coming from the trash, but directly from people’s homes, with Ikea buying items back from owners.

As suggested by the title of the campaign, Ikea understands that buyers often don’t want to keep every piece of furniture forever and, given that life is a rollercoaster, these items can become unwanted due to a variety of reasons. In the short campaign film, directed by Kavar Singh and Niels Windfeldt, these reasons include death, sobriety, separation, childbirth, or simply because a significant other finds it “too tacky”.

The Life Collection 2022 marks another step towards sustainability for the brand, as it continues to address the widespread issue of waste. As one of the world’s biggest buyers of wood, it has faced criticism in the past for unsustainable logging practices, and as such, has worked hard in recent years to improve its credentials.

Credits: 
Agency: Try
Creatives: Caroline Riis, Eirik Sørensen
Designers: Jeppe Gjesti, Mats Mæland, Magnus Snickars, Dennis Magnus-Andresen, Tommy Lybekk, Marthe Solli, Elise Eik Ismar
Directors: Kavar Singh, Niels Windfeldt
DOP: Oskar Dalsbakken

Opening Up the Outdoors (OUTO)

There has been a huge cultural shift in the way we view the great outdoors in recent years, particularly in the wake of the pandemic and our increased desire to spend time in nature for both our physical and mental health.

Couple that with technical outdoor retailers’ newfound appeal to style-conscious consumers (see the North Face x Gucci collab that broke the internet), and it’s unsurprising that business is booming.

“Spending quality time in the great outdoors is a right everyone should be able to enjoy, but ever since I began hiking, mountain biking and skiing I’ve often been one of the only Black or brown faces on the trail (or piste),” says journalist and filmmaker Keme Nzerem.

Recognising the power of brands to enact change, new non-profit Opening Up the Outdoors (OUTO) has been spun out off It’s Great Out There with a commitment to equity and inclusion. Founding members include leading outdoor brands the North Face, Arc’teryx, Adidas Terrex, Patagonia, and Vivobarefoot.

The organisation’s launch is accompanied by an eye-catching visual identity led by Amsterdam agency We Are Pi. The hand generated logo and illustrations evoke a DIY aesthetic, and are balanced with a utilitarian type system which nods to the design language of manuals and maps.

“The design approach goes against the established aesthetic of the outdoors, and feels like a true celebration of the new outdoor culture Black and brown communities are creating,” says the design team.

Credits:
Agency: We Are Pi
Design Director: Seth Josephs
Senior designer: Gemma Stoner
Motion Designer/Illustration: Nick Fatouris
Creative Director: Taylor Black
Creative Director: Daan van Dam
Copywriter: Maya Halilovic

Burger King’s minmal ad campaign

The creative centres on the fast food brand’s trademark flame grill lines, which are emphasised in a series of minimal graphic images that continue the vintage flavour of Burger King’s 2021 rebrand.

A series of accompanying taglines – woven into the stripy grill marks of the burgers – mock fast food competitors, with outdoor ads strategically placed near Mcdonald’s, KFC and Subway restaurants. The campaign’s echoed in limited edition Whopper wrappers, also emblazoned with grill lines, and BK employees at London’s Leicester Square restaurant will be decked out in stripy shirts.

While it might seem that Burger King is following where McDonald’s has led, it’s all part of a wider trend of simplified branding, with businesses in all areas adopting more stripped back approaches, in part to make imagery and logos work better in digital. It’s yet to be seen if the pendulum will, at some point, swing back towards maximalism.

Credits:
Ad Agency: BBH
CCO: Alex Grieve
ECD: Helen Rhodes
Deputy ECD: Felipe Serradourada Guimaraes
Copywriter: Marcy Rayson
Art Director: Callum Prior
Designer: Christian Kolodziejski

Least favourite fish gets a rebrand

Ever heard of Patagonian toothfish? Slimehead? Peekytoe crab? All of these none-too-delicious-sounding fish have been the subjects of successful rebranding campaigns, becoming Chilean sea bass, Orange roughy, and mud crab, in a bid to get people eating them.

Chicago-based practice Span Studio is hoping it can work some similar magic on Asian Carp – an invented, catch-all name for various types of carp which escaped from fish farm retention ponds in the 1970s, and have since taken over the Illinois River. The fish have impacted biodiversity and ecosystems, and there are fears they will go on to damage America’s Great Lakes.

The logo appears on a set of concept packaging designs, which envision how Copi might be sold – all emphasising the locally caught aspect. The ‘Eat well, do good’ tagline is the final element, with the rebrand designed to get people buying the fish at the supermarket, or ordering it from restaurant menus.