Tag Archives: Advertising

Love Wellness redesign

So Bosworth decided to consult the experts and invent a better approach—and in 2016 she launched Love Wellness, a line of curated body-positive health products for women.

The brand has had a couple different identities over the years, but hit its stride with its latest look, created by Lobster Phone and released this spring.

The San Francisco–based design firm delivered a new identity, website, packaging and creative strategy.

As Lobster Phone writes, “Inspiration for the logo was found in a late 1930s Art Deco type specimen; it felt playful, chunky and expressive. We used this as the basis for creating custom letterforms that are both clear and iconic. As illustrations are foundational to the larger brand, we made the ‘V’ of the logo into a face with lips that kiss and talk. Each product has its own quirky name, corresponding illustration and color combination that provide a not-so off-the-shelf look. The illustrations play off the style of the logo’s lips—an almost Japanese pop aesthetic—clearly demonstrating the benefits of the product in a dynamic way.”

Love_GoodToGlow.jpgLove_PackagingLineup.jpgLove_BizCards.jpgLove_WildPosting.jpg

Pentagram uplifting brand for mental health

Created by Paula Scher and her team, the identity focuses on a ‘square peg in a round hole’ icon that signifies there is no normal when it comes to mental health.

“Cole’s hope was that everyone sometimes has emotional issues and that everyone needs to be able to feel like it’s OK to feel that way and to talk about it and get help if they need it,” Scher explains. “I equated that feeling of not being emotionally stable to feeling like a square peg in a round hole. I wanted to create a symbol and system that could be universally recognised and take away the sanitarium aspect of mental health.”

The icon illustrates that there is no ‘normal’ when it comes to mental health and that everyone fits despite how it might feel. Set in the typeface Druk by Commercial Type, the chunky black letterforms are set against a rainbow of colours, which has been applied to business cards, stationery, the website and a set of posters which feature powerful phrases.

The Druk typeface is used again here to signal its connection to the Coalition. Likewise a bright but slightly more varied colour palette has been applied to represent the broad spectrum of mental health conditions, while also capturing a sense of optimism and hope.

For Scher, she felt it was her and her team’s responsibility to create an engaging but safe space. “I think the graphics have to be powerful and accessible, not timid or sedate, and allow people to feel like it’s OK to come into the site and participate,” she says.

These days will pass

The Your Space Or Mine project gives artists and creatives a platform on the street, and Titchner’s colourful, typographic piece, titled Please Believe These Days Will Pass, is a “rallying cry for hope” and a bid to boost morale. With many of us still only leaving the house for essential food shops and daily exercise, the piece aims to be a welcome break from the “monotony of our current situation”.

“When the words ‘Please Believe These Days Will Pass’ first came to me in 2012 who could imagine the ‘days’ that we find ourselves in now? My thinking at the time was a message to help one endure through difficult times, but also a reminder to cherish what is good in the here and now,” explains Titchner. “It’s what is good, such as the bravery of those working so hard on our behalf in the NHS or the safety of our loved ones, that will get us through when the endurance runs low. I’m very thankful of the opportunity to share these words again in sites across the UK and hope as we all do these days will pass before too long.”

Burger King quarantine whooper

Yet Burger King France has given it a go with its Le Whopper de la Quarantaine poster campaign, aka the Quarantine Whopper, which shows a poster of neatly organised, shop-bought ingredients that fans can use to imitate BK’s Whopper at home. While it doesn’t reveal how to cook and put all of these ingredients together, the image-focused ad is a nod of solidarity to the country, which has been under lockdown since March 17.

Created by Paris ad agency Buzzman, the ad was tweeted out on Burger King France’s official channeland received a wave of support and recreations with nearly 4,000 retweets and over 17,000 likes at the time of writing. As part of the campaign, Buzzman has also created similar iterations for its Le Steakhouse, Le Big Fish, and Le Big King burgers.

Can mouldy food sell food?

In a bid to emphasise its fresh food credentials, Burger King is showing the world exactly what happens when a Whopper is left to age for over a month.Moldy Burger King ad

Between the growing market for vegan, unprocessed or organic foods and the increased backlash in the face of the obesity crisis, it’s safe to say fast food chains are facing an uphill battle. While brands in this space have shown inventive responses to such quandaries, Burger King US has taken an unexpected punt at demonstrating its credentials as a producer of ‘real’ food. The move comes as the chain begins to remove preservatives from its recipes, apparently steering away from the additive-laden products most have come to expect from burger chains.

Built around the tagline ‘The beauty of no artificial preservatives’, the new campaign centres on a time lapse that begins with a meticulously assembled Whopper burger, staged M&S-style against a dramatic black backdrop. Before long, however, we see what happens to the burger as the days and weeks go by – insert mould, fluff and all manners of scuzz – to the tune of Aretha Franklin’s What A Difference A Day Makes.

The accompanying print ads follow a similar format, capturing the state of the Whopper on different days late into the decomposing process. The campaign was the creation of three agencies – David Miami, Publicis, and INGO Stockholm.

An image of a moldy burgerAn image from Burger King's new ad campaign

LSO Campaign

Superunion has been working with LSO since 2017, when it launched a new brand identity for the orchestra inspired by the movement of conductor Sir Simon Rattle’s baton. Previous campaigns have featured CG artwork based on Rattle’s hand gestures, but for LSO’s 2020/21 season, Superunion opted for a different approach, teaming up with Found Studio and dancer Ella Robson Guilfoyle to create a dramatic live-action dance film.

The campaign takes inspiration from the theme of LSO’s upcoming programme, ‘Dancing on the edge of a volcano’, which will see the orchestra perform work created in Europe in the first half of the 20th century. According to Rattle, the phrase was used by Austrian composer Alban Berg to describe the atmosphere in 1930s Germany and captures the mood of an era that produced “some of the darkest music possible”.

For the first shoot, Superunion filmed Robson Guilfoyle performing a series of short dance sequences based on Rattle’s movements (which were recorded using motion capture) while wearing colourful clothing. Footage was captured from above at 50 frames per second using 5K cameras. Guilfoyle then performed a series of movements with flares, sparkles, smoke grenades and chalk dust, which was filmed at 100 frames per second.

Totm redesign

Editorial photograph

TOTM wanted to be a disruptive femcare brand that stops you dead in your tracks when you see them on the shelf. So, for their redesign, they turned to Marsden/Mee to pump up the volume with these gloriously executed patterns.

“TOTM makes awesome, organic sanitary products for women. Right from the start, TOTM set out to be a disruptive brand, aiming to change the attitudes and behaviors of its target audience. We were initially brought on board to undertake a brand review and look at how the overall identity could better represent the mission and values at the heart of the brand.

The TOTM packaging instantly communicates the key aspects of the TOTM brand proposition: organic, bold, proud. It challenges conventional stereotypes of what an organic brand should look like, using vibrant color combinations and contrasting patterns inspired by shapes and patterns found in nature. Individually, each product is distinctive, and, as a collection, it has stand-out shelf-appeal. The packaging is designed to drive new online dialogue between TOTM and its customers, intentionally bold, and suited to social sharing, making a powerful statement about the values and attitude of the person sharing it.”Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Sephora power of beauty

French beauty chain Sephora has launched a new campaign called The Unlimited Power of Beauty, which signifies a shift in its brand positioning. “The Unlimited Power of Beauty is a new, powerful campaign that is deliberately different from previous years,” explains Olivier Vigneaux, the CEO for BETC Digital. “It is both universal in its casting and intimate in its tone and imagery, allowing viewers to see themselves in the story and discover the potential of their own beauty.”

The three-minute ad, directed by German creative Jonas Lindstroem, tells the story of a woman’s relationship with her reflection throughout her life. Tender and intimate, we follow the lead character from childhood to adulthood and are taken through relatable moments of both doubt and strength.

From experimenting with vivid makeup as a young girl to using it as an adult as a confidence boost after a hard day, the ad aims to highlight how the same person can explore the many facets of beauty in a lifetime, and even in just one day.

The campaign signifies a more grounded approach to the way we use makeup and beauty products, taking us away from the more theatrical. It acknowledges the ways in which beauty has evolved, going beyond catwalks and magazines, and how it can now be presented to us through friends’ selfies or uploads from influencers.

 

Minimalism McDonald’s

It can be risky to go minimalist in an ad campaign: what if your audience miss the point entirely and don’t realise who the ad is for? Yet McDonald’s has created a series of outdoor ads in recent years that have boldly expressed just how deeply the fast food brand is embedded in our collective consciousness.

Joining these are a new series of posters from Leo Burnett for McDonald’s UK, which abandon photographs of juicy burgers or crisp fries and instead simply opt for words. Surely an ad creative’s delight to work on, the posters prove that we need no more than text to get us feeling peckish. The campaign was created in collaboration with renowned typographer David Schwen, and clearly hark back to Schwen’s earlier series titled Type Sandwiches.

National Trust 125th anniversary ad

Credits:
Agency: Wieden+Kennedy London
Creative Director: Flo Heiss
Creatives: Derek Lui, Harry Ingrams
Executive Creative Directors: Tony Davidson, Iain Tait
Production Company: All Mighty Pictures
Director/DOP: Anthony Dickenson
Executive Producer/Creative Director: Mark Harbour
Design Director: Karen Jane
Lead Designer: Alex Thursby- Pelham
Designer: Xueling Wang