Tag Archives: rebrand

Love Wellness redesign

So Bosworth decided to consult the experts and invent a better approach—and in 2016 she launched Love Wellness, a line of curated body-positive health products for women.

The brand has had a couple different identities over the years, but hit its stride with its latest look, created by Lobster Phone and released this spring.

The San Francisco–based design firm delivered a new identity, website, packaging and creative strategy.

As Lobster Phone writes, “Inspiration for the logo was found in a late 1930s Art Deco type specimen; it felt playful, chunky and expressive. We used this as the basis for creating custom letterforms that are both clear and iconic. As illustrations are foundational to the larger brand, we made the ‘V’ of the logo into a face with lips that kiss and talk. Each product has its own quirky name, corresponding illustration and color combination that provide a not-so off-the-shelf look. The illustrations play off the style of the logo’s lips—an almost Japanese pop aesthetic—clearly demonstrating the benefits of the product in a dynamic way.”

Love_GoodToGlow.jpgLove_PackagingLineup.jpgLove_BizCards.jpgLove_WildPosting.jpg

Pentagram rebrand Jane Austen

According to Pentagram, the rebrand was a chance to avoid the “now-cliched iconography” that’s often associated with the writer.

A capital A, found in one of Austen’s handwritten letters, formed the basis for the museum’s new wordmark, while a secondary logo echoes the distinctive 12-sided desk the author sat at to write.

The colour palette is based on original wallpaper samples from the home, and Pentagram chose a pair of typefaces for the identity – Caslons Egyptian, which was released in 1816, and Caslon Doric, designed by Commercial Type.

Cadbury rebrand

In its newly unveiled brand identity, the company attempts to tread the fine line between heritage and modernity, retaining its signature purple hue but introducing a redrawn wordmark, new iconography and a fresh approach to typography.

Created by design agency Bulletproof, the refreshed Cadbury wordmark is a contemporary take on the signature of the company’s founder, John Cadbury.

Meanwhile, the agency reimagined the Dairy Milk Glass and a Half logo so that it links directly with the brand’s chocolate chunk symbol, and developed a new pattern for the chocolate based on its original packaging from 1905.Nick Rees, global creative director at Bulletproof, says: “We wanted to recapture the very spirit of Cadbury, so part of the research process involved digging into the Cadbury archives to reinterpret its iconic visual cues to create a modern and playful identity that still has a clear recognition for consumers.”The new brand identity was kicking off in Australia in May, followed by South Africa and Malaysia later in the year, and will be rolled out to other markets including the UK and Ireland at the beginning of 2021.

Studio Dumbar remands Brugge’s

Local football clubs have also been working to raise the profile of women’s football and attract new players to the sport. This week, Club Brugge’s women’s team revealed a new name and a slick visual identity created by Studio Dumbar (part of design agency Dept) and independent art director Ludovic Beun.

The rebrand sees the club renamed as Club YLA in honour of Yvonne Lahousse, a Brugge local and diehard fan. “[Lahousse] died in 2006 at the age of 91. She was the ‘mother of the Spionkop’ – the part of the stadium with the most loyal supporters. Her fanaticism was legendary; mere days before giving birth she could still be found behind the goal to cheer on the team,” says Studio Dumbar.

The design aims to reflect Lahousse’s “dynamic, passionate and energetic” spirit, and will be applied to merchandise as well as outdoor ads and digital communications. With its bold black-and-white colour palette, angular typeface and striking photography by Stig de Block, it’s a fresh and contemporary look – one that feels closer to campaigns from the likes of Nike and Adidas than it does to traditional football branding.

The logotype is used alongside Klim Type Foundry’s typeface, Söhne Breit, in communications: “We specifically choose Söhne to contrast the hard-edged logotype and layouts and create more tension. It’s contemporary and functional with clear letter forms,” adds Enebeis.

Photography, meanwhile, aims to reflect the club’s “down to earth attitude” and urban location, while the colour palette reflects the team’s core colours of black, white and blue.

Ashmolean’s rebrand

As part of a strategy overhaul, the museum enlisted design studio Blast to create a new identity that would help to improve brand awareness and ultimately expand the museum’s reach – in terms of both the size and diversity of its audience.Ashmolean museumWarhol poster

First and foremost was the logo redesign, which is now represented by a crisp, geometric serif A complete with an extended crossbar, “inspired by the concept of a timeline”. The new logo is designed to create a “bold, recognisable symbol for the Ashmolean, a distinctive shorthand mark, recognisable at small sizes and from distance,” Tunnicliffe says.

“The logo is designed to form the cornerstone for typographiclayouts, signposting information, dates, events, art or artefacts,” he adds. The new logo was formed with flexibility in mind, giving freedom to adopt a range of layouts and, crucially, hitting the right notes across digital touchpoints – whether the Ashmolean’s online platforms or the information screens within the museum. Blast also developed a new tagline for the institution: ‘Inspiring minds, since 1683’.Ashmolean logoAshmolean exhibition postersBeyond the logo, the aspect of the overhaul that arguably jumps out most is the colour palette, which now welcomes flashes of colour akin to those seen in Pop Art. “We wanted a vibrant palette to keep communication fresh and engaging,” Tunnicliffe says. But it wasn’t a case of throwing away the history books altogether; hidden amongst the grabby colours are subtle allusions to the Ashmolean’s rich heritage. “The brand colour palette is inspired by the vibrant colours of the museum’s galleries, paired with the more subtle colours of the exterior stonework.”MerchandiseAshmolean identity in use across catalogues

7 Brothers Brewing

Today, Seven Brothers (stylised as Seven Bro7hers) has taken its unusual business formation and run with it in terms of the concept behind its zingy new branding. The refresh was led by Manchester-based creative branding agency Creative Spark, and centres around the idea of the lucky number seven.

Creative Spark wanted to ensure that the cans stand out on the shelves, and key to this was a vibrant colour palette that helps to distinguish them from other brands. “We did some initial research with [insights agency] Humanise into what new and current customers wanted from the Seven Brothers brand,” Marra says.

The insights informed the brighter approach to the palette, though the brand still maintains its original core colours of black, white and yellow too. “Crucially the colour combos had to stand out on the shelf, and the colours also make the flavours recognisable to the customer while enabling us to have some fun with packaging.”

Key to developing recognisability was the prominent use of the number seven, which is presented in different yet uniformly punchy 3D typefaces across the product variants. “The unique sevens we created allow each can to have its own look, but will still be recognisable as a Seven Brothers can,” says Marra.

It’s an unusual approach to alter what is essentially a logo across a product range, particularly for a nascent brand. However, it certainly feels as though the seven is locked down as a core emblem, giving the brand room to breathe in terms of the type choices.New cans designed for Seven Brothers breweryBrand guidelines for Seven Brothers brewing co.Seven Brothers beer brand update

Maggie’s

The organisation provides free cancer support and information for people with cancer and their family and friends from support specialists, psychologists, nutritionists, therapists and benefits advisors in centres across the UK and online.

“Maggie’s was looking for a brand identity that was more visible than before, and would help them stretch from just campaigning to caring and supporting,” says Willer. “They needed to express their point of difference more clearly from lots of other voices in the charity world.”

The team started the identity project by “helping define or articulate the unique perspective a client brings to the world” – in Maggie’s case, being the “everyone’s home of cancer care”, says Willer. It then helped Maggie’s to create a new website and explored how the brand could work across multiple platforms – from print to social media and internal touch points.

“The colours are inspired by the spaces themselves,” says Willer. “Instead of the clinical lighting or materials that are often found in a clinical environment, the centres have very warm natural colours, tending towards tones of orange. In the same way that the new house logo has multiple shapes, we felt that a range of warm colours was more suitable to represent a family of spaces than just one. Each centre is quite individual, but all are extremely welcoming and ‘home-like.’”

A bespoke typeface was created, along with a “human and practical wordmark” set in entirely in upper case to resemble an architect’s handwriting (and avoid any possible confusion with the charity’s founder’s personal signature). Pentagram also redesigned Maggie’s magazine to give it a more lifestyle-like feel – and avoid the “institutional and unappealing” feel of many charity publications. The redesign extended to communications for hospital noticeboards and Maggie’s centres, which are again designed to feel human – rather than cold, clinical or impersonal.

DK new identity

The brand overhaul was done by Angus Hyland and his team at the Pentagram London office, and according to the design studio is an attempt to reconnect with existing readers, as well as find those all-important new ones.

Hyland has kept the the open book shape that people will be familiar with, but reduced some of the detail – allowing it to work more effectively at different sizes and in different environments. The serif typeface is now gone, replaced by a bespoke serif.

While many of us might have had a soft spot for the old logo, this is undoubtedly an improvement. There was always a hint of clip art about the previous motif, and it very much felt like the symbol of an educational company rather than a publisher.

Pentagram’s work brings it up to date, but also transforms it into a surprisingly elegant mark. It’s easy to imagine it embossed on books of all kinds.

The agency have also introduced a new tagline – For the curious – which reflects the diversity of content DK publishes.

Penagram’s new identity for Fisher-Price

Created by Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity sits alongside a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy featuring the simple tagline: Let’s be kids.

Developed by Pentagram partner Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity coincides with a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy, which includes the mission statement “put the fun back into functional” and the “play back into playtime”. This is accompanied by a simple but effective new tagline: Let’s be kids.

The new identity centres on a simplified version of the brand’s historic red ‘awning’ mark, in which its four scalloped edges have been reduced to three. The logotype has been redrawn in all lowercase, with letterforms that are slightly more refined but still quirky. The hyphen between the names is now a semicircle, echoing the scalloped edge of the awning, as well as resembling a smile.

Working with type designer Jeremy Mickel, Oberman introduced a custom, semi sans serif typeface called Let’s Be Glyphs, which is partly inspired by the historic typeface Cheltenham, widely used in the toy maker’s early advertising and packaging.

An alternative typeface has also been developed called Let’s Be Glyphs Bouncy, which features rotated characters and an uneven baseline, while sans serif font Maax will be used as a secondary typeface.

Netherlands new identity.

As part of the country’s new identity, Studio Dumbar has designed a new wordmark for the Netherlands which gives a subtle nod to the national flower.

The wordmark combines the country acronym, NL and the tulip, the national flower. “The tulip is the most famous symbol of the Netherlands,” says Tom Dorresteijn, strategy director at Studio Dumbar. “But we wanted to steer clear of an obvious literal tulip as the symbol is too much connected to tourism and souvenirs.” Instead the team created a subtle silhouette of tulip petals between the N and the L letterforms.The typeface used in ‘the Netherlands’ element of the logo is Nitti Grotesk, designed by the Dutch type foundry Bold Monday. “This idiosyncratic typeface has warmth and humanity. The long ascenders give this font its particular character, which works really well with the logo,” explains Dorresteijn. “For us [the logo] expresses simplicity, smartness and clarity,” he adds, and will be in use from January (in eight possible language variations).