Tag Archives: rebrand

Habito’s new identity

The mortgage company has worked with Uncommon on an unexpectedly psychedelic rebrand, which lives in a “euphoric dreamscape”

The world of finance and mortgages aren’t the first place you’d look for fantastical branding, but Habito’s new identity is shaking off the stuffy typefaces and restrained colour palettes in favour of what Uncommon describes as “phantasmagoric” visuals.

The studio has introduced a new logo and series of graphics – designed in partnership with New York artist Saiman Chow. The brand’s former word mark – which was very much part of the geometric sans serif movement – has been replaced with a chunky ‘winged’ typeface, which apparently speaks to the ease of getting a mortgage via Habito.

It’s also part of a mortgage heaven vs hell narrative the brand has set up, which includes animated TV adsdepicting towering stacks of paper and grasping tentacles as the nightmare alternative to Habito.

But while it’s great to see more brands using expressive typefaces, where the identity really shines is in the swirly dreamlike textures and graphics that form the backdrop.

Waterford rebrand

The original logo was monochrome, cast in a serif typeface, which felt a little old-fashioned. To update it, the agency has redrawn Waterford’s icon and work mark, inspired by the brand’s signature Lismore cut, which references the battlements and windows of Lismore castle in Waterford. The new logo uses these cuts as letterforms as a nod to its craft, with the original Waterford cross section of the W still retained. 

The clean cut of logo creates a contemporary interpretation and this was one of Identica’s biggest tasks: to reframe the brand as “desirable and relevant to a younger audience”. In the past the brand has actively built the perception of being saved for special occasions, but now wanted to create the idea that Waterford is a beautiful product that can “transform everyday moments to make them truly special”. 

The new colour palette also helps to modernise the brand, as it combines a dark moody green with a molten orange. The combination is a tribute to the “elemental starting point” of each crystal piece. Waterford’s famous seahorse also got a makeover, with Identica redesigning the character to feel like a “modern shorthand” of the brand. 

“The brief was one that many established brands have faced; how do we retain the essence of Waterford’s rich history, craftsmanship and Irish heritage but ensure that these feel relevant, compelling and desirable for a younger audience?” says Richard Clayton, Identica’s creative director. “I was hugely inspired by walking around the workshops, in awe of how the craftsmen were shaping the molten crystal using simple wooden paddles, how the crystal cutters manipulate small and huge crystal pieces over the diamond cutting wheels creating complex and delicate patterns.”

Kia unveils a new signature-inspired logo

The logo design features a parallel between the stem of the K and the diagonal stroke of the A, which now has the appearance of being italicised, arguably costing the wordmark slightly when it comes to legibility. Although the symmetry of the wordmark loses it some of its handwritten look, there’s a clear rhythmic quality – like a waveform or a heart rate graph – that taps into the idea of movement at the centre of the new strategy and slogan.

Veganly Is SO Adorable

SO Veganly is a natural delight. Utilizing a slim and sophisticated typeface for it’s logo, this Texas-based eatery appeals to a millennial audience. The hand drawn illustrations that adorn the bottles and boxes have an abstract look that feels fresh. Celebrating eating well with So Veganly with an earthly color pallate and a minimal design that speaks to how fresh their food is. 

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The concept of the re-brand was to embody the holistic nature and approach of the business with a fresh, intriguing and vibrant brand identity, incorporating hand-drawn illustrations and patterns that tell a story through design. SO Veganly is a place for everyone to come together to experience and explore nutritious vegan food, in way that that feels like home-cooked food, taking not short cuts in creating fulfilling meals in a space that celebrates nature’s finest ingredients.

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Burger King rebrand

The fast food giant is showing no signs of slowing down as we enter a new year, however, having just unveiled its first major rebrand in over two decades.

At the heart of the rebrand is a reimagined version of its existing logo, which ditches the reflective burger bun for a more stripped back design.

“The main difference now is that we adjusted the colour to make it more vibrant and more like the colours of food. And we adjusted the proportions of the bun to look more like the products that we sell.”

Meanwhile, a more in-your-face photography style using dramatic close-ups to communicate the fast food chain’s recent emphasis on its fresh food credentials, plus a new illustration style, adds a playful touch to the overall look.

New Identity for wine connoisseurs SommSelect

While the world of wine, and particular sommeliers, has traditionally been characterised by stuffiness and exclusivity, SommSelect is making it more accessible via its subscription service and an ever-evolving online wine shop.

The rebrand comes off the back of huge growth amid the pandemic and the forced closure of bars and restaurants, with SommSelect’s wine club subscriptions up by 300% in the last six months alone.

Saks brought in Deva Pardue, formerly of Pentagram and The Wing, to lead the rebrand and draw in a new generation of more adventurous wine drinkers.

The refreshed visual identity nods to the sophistication of the sommelier experience, while also looking to elevate it to a more modern and approachable place.

A new logomark leverages the prominence of the letter ‘S’ in the company’s name to create an elegant, corkscrew-like letterform.

The wordmark is based on a customised version of the primary brand typeface, Canela by Commercial Type.

Virgin Money rebrand

There has been a movement among traditional financial institutions to adopt a more human persona in recent years – largely thanks to younger, cooler challenger banks like Monzoand Starling snapping at their heels.

Virgin Money approached Pentagram’s Luke Powell, Jody Hudson-Powell and Domenic Lippa to create a fresh look to go with its new proposition, as a brand that shares Virgin’s core values but happens to be in banking, as opposed to a financial brand that happens to be part of Virgin.

The new identity looks to move the brand firmly away from the often faceless, corporate look favoured by many financial services companies, and reflect a customer-focused approach to banking.

The design team created a bespoke mono-linear wordmark, with the wider Virgin Money headline font family being built from this geometric logo.

“The overall construction is a balance of geometric curves, nuanced humanist forms, and hard edges and angles, creating a visual form that references Virgin Money’s functional and pragmatic side while embodying its people-centred approach,” says Pentagram.

The instantly recognisable Virgin red is used as the brand’s primary colour, alongside a secondary colour palette of bright blue, purple and white.

A refreshing new look for the East London Liquor Co

Founded in 2014, Bow-based distillery the East London Liquor Co produces a range of spirits. Already a firm favourite among bartenders, the distillery approached branding agency Ragged Edge to refresh its visual identity in order to help it appeal directly to drinkers.

“We helped them build a brand that’s unpretentious, unapologetic, and unabashed in its flagrant disregard for convention.” says Ragged Edge co-founder Max Ottignon.

The agency created a custom typeface with with NaN Foundry, which is made more unique with glyphs inspired by the local area, the distillery itself, and the production process.

A fluorescent yellow ‘smiler’ icon is inspired by an old crest found in nearby Victoria Park, and incorporates the shape of the River Thames to create a unique smiley emoji.

The identity has been brought to life on East London Liquor Co’s existing product ranges and several new ones, which are tied together using a vibrant colour palette and abstracted graphics.

Australian Centre for the Moving Image rebrand

As the Australian Centre for the Moving Image enters a new era, the museum has revealed a fresh look created by design studio North.

When the museum reopens in early 2021, it will have a fresh look devised by UK design agency North, which will complete ACMI’s transformation from its beginnings as a local film centre in the 1940s to the most visited museum of its kind.

ACMI branding by North

At the heart of the identity is a distinctive new wordmark, which is squared off at the edges for an impactful boxy effect that lends itself well to a grid system. The ‘m’ subtly calls to mind the shape of a video cassette, and makes for a far more memorable logotype than its somewhat corporate predecessor. A new typeface, Px Grotesk, has also been introduced to the suite to be used across all touchpoints.

North worked closely with ACMI’s in-house design team on the identity, which features a streamlined colour palette that enhances the vibrant imagery used across the museum’s cultural programme. The update comes with revamped signage, merchandise and campaign assets, as well as a new website created by Liquorice and internal wayfinding by Büro North.

Kaibosh new identity

Eyes before guys, y’all. Snask developed a new, hip brand identity for an eyewear company in Norway, Kaibosh. Combined, the text, color palette, and copy give Kaboish a young and fun personality, instantly making the experience of going to get your eyes checked—which is pretty boring—way better. The approach also allows the frames to truly stand out in the store, helping consumers find stylish frames that suit them perfectly.

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“We got contacted by the Norwegian eyewear company Kaibosh. They felt that they had become too boring as opposed to what they should be, a trendy and bold eyewear brand. They felt their identity was too clean and they wanted to be more expressive and outgoing. The fashionable contender would finally get a fitting dress as well as a lovely new voice. We got the assignment to start out with keeping their existing logotype and from that develop their new brand ranging from signs, ads, packaging, bags, posters as well as create their entire flagship store.”

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