Tag Archives: rebrand

DK new identity

The brand overhaul was done by Angus Hyland and his team at the Pentagram London office, and according to the design studio is an attempt to reconnect with existing readers, as well as find those all-important new ones.

Hyland has kept the the open book shape that people will be familiar with, but reduced some of the detail – allowing it to work more effectively at different sizes and in different environments. The serif typeface is now gone, replaced by a bespoke serif.

While many of us might have had a soft spot for the old logo, this is undoubtedly an improvement. There was always a hint of clip art about the previous motif, and it very much felt like the symbol of an educational company rather than a publisher.

Pentagram’s work brings it up to date, but also transforms it into a surprisingly elegant mark. It’s easy to imagine it embossed on books of all kinds.

The agency have also introduced a new tagline – For the curious – which reflects the diversity of content DK publishes.

Penagram’s new identity for Fisher-Price

Created by Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity sits alongside a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy featuring the simple tagline: Let’s be kids.

Developed by Pentagram partner Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity coincides with a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy, which includes the mission statement “put the fun back into functional” and the “play back into playtime”. This is accompanied by a simple but effective new tagline: Let’s be kids.

The new identity centres on a simplified version of the brand’s historic red ‘awning’ mark, in which its four scalloped edges have been reduced to three. The logotype has been redrawn in all lowercase, with letterforms that are slightly more refined but still quirky. The hyphen between the names is now a semicircle, echoing the scalloped edge of the awning, as well as resembling a smile.

Working with type designer Jeremy Mickel, Oberman introduced a custom, semi sans serif typeface called Let’s Be Glyphs, which is partly inspired by the historic typeface Cheltenham, widely used in the toy maker’s early advertising and packaging.

An alternative typeface has also been developed called Let’s Be Glyphs Bouncy, which features rotated characters and an uneven baseline, while sans serif font Maax will be used as a secondary typeface.

Netherlands new identity.

As part of the country’s new identity, Studio Dumbar has designed a new wordmark for the Netherlands which gives a subtle nod to the national flower.

The wordmark combines the country acronym, NL and the tulip, the national flower. “The tulip is the most famous symbol of the Netherlands,” says Tom Dorresteijn, strategy director at Studio Dumbar. “But we wanted to steer clear of an obvious literal tulip as the symbol is too much connected to tourism and souvenirs.” Instead the team created a subtle silhouette of tulip petals between the N and the L letterforms.The typeface used in ‘the Netherlands’ element of the logo is Nitti Grotesk, designed by the Dutch type foundry Bold Monday. “This idiosyncratic typeface has warmth and humanity. The long ascenders give this font its particular character, which works really well with the logo,” explains Dorresteijn. “For us [the logo] expresses simplicity, smartness and clarity,” he adds, and will be in use from January (in eight possible language variations).

Simmons & Simmons rebrand

The rebrand is designed to reflect Simmons & Simmons’ interest and investment in emerging technology, as well as attract keen young graduates that might otherwise be lured away by Silicon Valley. It’s an attempt to stand out from the sea of other law firms, who for years have relied on the same old branding to attract clients and employees.

“Law and lawyers are lagging well behind the rest of the world when it comes to branding, marketing and things like that,” SomeOne founder Simon Manchipp told CR. “They’ve always relied on really big brains attracting other big brains, but I think they’ve woken up and started to understand that brand is not just a logo, typeface and colour. It’s reputation, and the visual identity helps manage that reputation.”

FACEBOOK rebrand

Facebook has launched a new company brand of the same name (this time in capitals) to differentiate the company from the app, which will continue using its current logo and branding.

The new branding aims to make Facebook’s ownership of other apps and products – including Instagram, Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, Oculus and Portal – clearer to users. This follows a decision made in June to add the tagline ‘from Facebook’ within all of Facebook’s apps and services.

The new identity includes a capitalised wordmark in a bespoke typeface and an ever-changing colour palette that will adapt depending on the product it appears on. It was carried out by Facebook’s internal design team in collaboration with UK-based type foundry Dalton Maag and brand consultants Saffron.

Facebook’s design team said the rebrand was built on three “design behaviours”: ‘clarity’, ’empathy’ and ‘creating space’. The aim – according to the team – was to create a brand that “simplifies and builds understanding”, is “respectful of context and environment” in which it operates and creates space for sharing people’s stories.

With its use of capital letters, a custom font and rounded corners, the word mark is designed to make a clear distinction between company and app, which uses a lower case word mark in a bold sans font.

“We designed the new company wordmark with clarity and openness in mind. It’s built on a stable structure through the use of consistent stroke width, harmonised capital letters and a horizontal emphasis. The generous spacing and open letterforms allow clarity at small sizes, and the subtle softening of corners and diagonals adds a sense of optimism,” said the team.

Fox’s rebrand

The Fox logo has undergone a subtle redesign, with a chunky new version also created for animations, which show the original logo morphing into the geometric version. According to Trollbäck+Company, the studio reduced the updated mark down to its core components, broke it apart, and then used the pieces as abstract shapes and patterns across the entire rebrand. These ‘broken letters’ will be used in patterns and ‘creative framing’, and play a role in everything from social media posts to huge billboards. The updated identity – which Fox is calling a ‘brand evolution – will now appear across the 17 stations owned by the entertainment company, as well as its 100+ affiliate stations.

According to Alex Moulton, Chief Creative Officer at Trollbäck+Company, the work is intended to position Fox as “an entertainment brand that’s forging culture”. The studio’s Executive Creative Director, Elliott Chaffer, adds, “The way the industry is today, the middle of the road is the best place to get run over. We needed to bring back and champion the brand’s ability to take big swings and bigger risks.”

yahoo! rebrand

They say that all publicity is good publicity, but Yahoo has been particularly prone to the bad kind in recent years. A series of data scandals combined with doubts over Yahoo’s relevance in the modern marketplace together paint a pretty sombre picture.

However, the brand is still looking to the future, which it’ll go into with a new visual identity created by Pentagram in a project led by New York-based Partner Michael Bierut. With the refresh comes a new logo that sees Yahoo do away with its former goofy typeface in place of a slick, lower case sans-serif.

The new logo is said to throw back to the original 1996 design, though the logo itself hadn’t changed radically over the subsequent 20 years, the tilted exclamation mark having been a staple of its logo throughout this time.

Today, the branding is decidedly sleeker and neatly ties all of Yahoo’s sprawling sub-brands under one identity. Meanwhile, the vibrant purple palette (comprising ‘grape jelly’, ‘malbec’ and ‘hulk pants’) packs a punch, while the overall simplicity does push the exclamation mark to centre stage. Images showing the new look splashed across billboards in a real-world context look significantly more pulled together and representative of a contemporary tech brand.

Meet Alan

As part of a brand refresh for healthcare company Alan, DesignStudio has created a fluffy digital mascot that’s designed to make people feel good.

The company currently offers health insurance in France, but has plans to expand across Europe. According to DesignStudio, the updated identity is meant to convey a warmer and friendlier personality that will stand out in the healthcare marketplace.The end result is well executed and certainly feels unexpected, but there’s a question mark around whether it’s all just a little bit too warm and fuzzy.

Teach First rebrand

The charity has ditched its “corporate” identity in favour of an all-encompassing rebrand that reflects its mission to create fair education for all.

The update was almost two years in the making, and required Teach First to “take a hard look at their brand”, says Johnson Banks. The charity wanted to move away from its previous style and embrace something bolder that would reflect its focus on tackling inequality and helping children reach their potential, while also conveying a “grittier, more direct tone of voice”.

The studio says the refreshed identity also needed communicate with a “bewildering array” of people, from graduates, teachers and headmasters to people considering changing career as well as government departments and corporate sponsors.