Tag Archives: rebrand

Park Lane Hotel’s new identity

Park Lane, the luxury hotel in New York City, has launched a new identity designed to emerge from a “sea of old-world sameness” according to Mother Design, which was behind the new look.

“The previous branding, rooted in 70s luxury design, was in dire need of an update; not only from a visual perspective, but also to feel more inclusive,” Mother Design says. “We brought seasonality into the design, a super rich colour palette, and most of all brand language that’s both elevated and invitational; the poetic language entices locals as well as travellers.”

These ideas are central to the updated Park Lane wordmark, which taps into the appetite for Art Nouveau lettering at the moment. It features straight, architectural lines set against swooping, ornate curves designed to evoke “wandering paths” or “botanical tendrils”, according to the agency. The new wordmark has been condensed down into an icon (so far used minimally) in which the initials P and L are stacked on top of one another, the softness accentuated with ribbon-like detailing.

Zagat rebranded

In the late 70s, two Americans living in Paris found themselves wishing for a restaurant resource that reflected the opinions of their foodie friends rather than those of professional critics or mystery reviewers.

The couple, Nina and Tim Zagat, ended up creating the guide they’d always wanted themselves. The subsequent success of what became the Zagat Restaurant Guide introduced people to the idea of user-generated content and helped to democratise restaurant criticism forever.

The Zagat team brought in Brooklyn-based studio Franklyn to create a new brand system and campaign assets that would better represent the review site’s history while also feeling contemporary.

Franklyn started by giving the brand’s existing wordmark a typographic polish, shifting from Helvetica, which was used for its original 1979 iteration, to a more modern and digital-friendly cut of Neue Haas Grotesk by the Commercial Type foundry.Video Player.

While the new logo has a modernist sensibility rooted in the late 1970s with its strong grids, clear hierarchies and simple compositions, the studio introduced more flexibility in the rest of the brand system.

Key design elements include a digital-forward approach to colour, iconography, hierarchy and animation, along with a more fluid typographic palette featuring Avant Garde, Cheltenham and Tungsten.

Geltor’s identity by &Walsh 

The company has a new visual identity designed by creative agency &Walsh that draws on cells and nature for inspiration. While the existing logo remains, &Walsh fleshed out a new visual language around it, from typeface and colourways to illustration and imagery.

The 3D visuals are crisp without feeling overly clinical, and pop against the royal blue palette. The key assets involve orbs containing a smorgasbord of natural ingredients that inspired Geltor’s proteins. The result is like a Björk video frozen within a snow globe, complete with the surreal art direction we’ve come to expect from &Walsh.

The team also developed an iconography system and a set of line-based illustrations to help distil complex information and make the company feel warmer and more approachable.

A slick bike motif for Lyon’s 

At its heart is a bike-shaped monoline motif that blends together the infinity symbol, which has been repurposed as tyres, with a set of handlebars.

“The goal is for everyone to be able to recognise, reuse and draw the design with ease,” says the studio. “It evokes cycling, cycling routes, openness and freedom.”

According to Spintank, the identity offers a “positive, friendly and inclusive vision of the change we need to make in mobility”. It features in a teaser ad campaign that appeared across Lyon, as well as on social media, encouraging residents to participate.

London Olympia complex

Originally opened in 1886, Olympia London is undergoing a major redevelopment designed by Heatherwick Studio and SPPARC Architects, which aims to position the new area (known simply as Olympia) as a hub for creative arts in west London.

On top of the existing Olympia London events and exhibition spaces, there will be seven new buildings, including a new theatre, a live music arena, office and studio spaces, eateries and two hotels. The development is due to open to the public in 2024.

The branding for the area has been led by the London arm of SomeOne, with a brand strategy built around the idea that “it’s showtime”.

The Olympia wordmark, developed in collaboration with Miles Newlyn, follows a curve that draws on the arches of the historic Olympia Exhibition Halls. The primary typeface is Right Grotesk by Montreal-based foundry Pangram Pangram, and appears in various styles and weights as a nod to the venue’s vintage exhibition posters.

Meanwhile the letter ‘O’ has inspired a ring-shaped motif that appears across accompanying visuals. The circular band is made up of elements alluding to the area’s future attractions – musical instruments, office tables, food and drink – rendered in CG with the help of weareseventeen and 3D artist Ingrid Tsy. While reminiscent of the BBC One circle idents, the circle works nicely as a framing device, particularly when animated.

Insurance firm Next get new branding by Collins

Next’s new branding and tone of voice are designed to steer clear of the clichés surrounding insurance companies, which “are either your overly earnest protectors from doom, or rely on the absurdity of animals and athletes to help you remember them”, according to design agency Collins, which led the brand redesign.

The team took an illustrated approach to the brand visuals, which feature bright palettes and a cast of friendly, motivational characters, including a toolbox and a chef’s hat.

The new branding includes a tagline imploring small business owners to ‘get going’ and messaging that focuses less on risk and more on opportunity.

Next has also commissioned small business owners and creators around the US to contribute to its corporate apparel and gift items, photography and videography, and custom on-hold music.

CALM

CALM is known for its headline-grabbing campaigns, such as Project 84, which saw 84 sculptures line the rooftop of the ITV building on London’s Southbank to represent the number of men who take their own lives each week.

The charity has now launched a new film, Stay, which relays moving anecdotes and experiences of bereaved family members as well as survivors. The film comes as the charity reveals its new branding led by design studio Output, with language developed by Reed Words. Output worked on CALM’s new brand identity for around six months from start to finish, and a new web platform is also in the works.

“The previous brand had great equity and was loved by many, but it was created for print, then applied to digital spaces. Refreshing it gave an opportunity to design the core identity with rigour across all formats: online, offline and beyond,” she says. “It meant we could consider accessibility, particularly around access to the most vital services like the webchat and helpline, alongside expressive communications which would allow more freedom” says Output partner and creative director Johanna Drewe.

The visual identity draws on high intensity palettes featuring flashes of neon, and is capped by a refreshed wordmark. In the new design, the charity’s name is aligned to highlight the CALM acronym, however it retains the speech bubble concept seen in its predecessor.

“The brand has to do so many different things, from support to activism, but it needs to always feel like CALM. We were also conscious that it should feel like a natural evolution – the next iteration of a much-loved brand, rather than something completely new,” Drewe says.CALM branding on postersstudio-output.com; thecalmzone.net

PT’s Coffee Roasting Co.

PT’s Coffee Roasting Company, established in 1993 in Topeka, Kansas was in need of a brand refresh as they celebrated their 25th anniversary. As we approached the brand identity re-brand, we were truly inspired by PT’s passion for exceptional coffee from seed to cup. It was important for the new identity to reflect their love of coffee from their direct trade relationships with the farmers to the retail clientele.

The inspiration behind the updated PT’s mark and identity happened on a visit to PT’s Coffee headquarters in Topeka, Kansas. Less than two miles from PT’s roasting facility, we drove by a herd of bison grazing on the Kansas prairie. The bison of the great plains represents strength, unity and abundance. PT’s wanted their new identity to be reflective of these same values as well and connect to their Midwest roots. The design style reinforces the hand-crafted nature of PT’s products—making their brand more approachable and memorable in the market.

Rochester Rhinos FC rebrand

Ahead of the 2022 season, Rochester Rhinos has launched a complete rebrand, including a change of name to Rochester New York FC, which steers it away from varsity-like naming conventions and more firmly into the world of soccer.

The rebrand was led by London-based agency A New Kind of Kick, which has been working on the project in both the US and the UK for the past year, including consulting with fans and key ambassadors for the club.

Along with the change of name, the club’s new badge features curvilinear details designed to evoke High Falls, a waterfall at the heart of the city, replacing the rhinoceros emblem that was previously central to the crest.

The waterfall symbolism carries through to design of the kit numbers, which have been adapted from the primary typeface, Knockout, to mimic the three lines seen on the badge.

The new branding is complete with a refreshed palette, trading the former dark green and mustard for a mint and slate combination, and a range of promotional assets that play with graphics and tap into the current trend of repeating type.

Breeze rebranded

Leeds City Council has run Breeze for the past 20 years, offering activities, events and discounts to under 19 year-olds across the city. To coincide with the launch of a new membership app, it commissioned Kiss Branding to refresh the identity of the platform, to take in a diverse audience of toddlers, kids and teens plus also parents and tourists in the city.

Kiss Branding created a contemporary campaign featuring bright and bold typography and illustration, created in-house. “We landed on the concept of ‘Freedom’s a Breeze’ as a core brand idea,” says Poonam Saini, creative director at Kiss. “Breeze makes finding activities and discounts in Leeds ‘easy breezy’ so it was important that our new brand embodies this sense of simplicity and contentment.

“The swooping logo and typography, playful yet refined colour palette along with contemporary, inclusive illustrations come together to create a brand worthy of the Breeze offering – a world away from the typical ‘town council’ identity they had previously.”