Tag Archives: package design

SOAC

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Brand identity for SOAC, calming eye drops for irritated eyes. Rasmus und Christin created a colorful brand identity including a functional packaging and sonorous naming. The logotype’s strong contrast of the letters point out the product’s main feature – immediate relief of visual disturbance.

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Freelance Designers and Donates To WHO COVID-19 Solidarity Fund

Editorial photographEditorial photographEliqs, makers of custom and personalized craft beer cans, typically for special events, has made available for sale custom vessels aimed at supporting the fight against COVID-19 while also providing financial support to freelance designers. Proceeds from the sales of the specially designed cans go to the WHO COVID-19 Solidarity Fund, and sales featuring designs by contributing freelancers get split between the WHO fund and the artist.Editorial photographEditorial photographAll nine available designs feature recommendations made by experts, such as practicing social distancing, washing hands, or how to recognize symptoms. Besides promoting coronavirus-fighting tips, the labels share little in common visually, reflecting a diverse range of styles, such as Eric Hinkley’s can which found inspiration in early 20th-century morale posters, or Cody Brown’s design mixing patterns and line work with fun type. Editorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

Art of Play

“We collaborated with Art of Play, producers of some of the finest playing cards in the universe, to bring you one strange deck. These cards feature a completely custom design in typical Messymod fashion which can be described as minimal, modern, graphic, quirky, stylized, grotesque, delightful and just plain weird.

We designed this deck so that each card has its own presence and personality, making them ideal pieces of artwork that can stand on their own. Each card has patterns of suits within suits for endless fun.

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Packaged in a premium letterpress-printed tuck box both inside and out. Printed by the U.S. Playing Card Co. on Art of Play’s trademark thin-stock preferred by cardists.

Individual decks available on www.artofplay.com

20 Wine bottles with a story

When we were asked to brand it and name it, it was that story-telling aspect of the wine that we wanted to bring to the surface. To do so, we decided to reinvent the bottle of wine so it could serve as a vessel for both a sophisticated liquid as well as for an engaging piece of literature. We named it Twenty Stories and created twenty unique labels with twenty unique stories, one for every year of LIDL in Greece.

The labels were printed on white, heavy, matte writing paper and were shredded on one side to give out the sensation of a real page that has been just ripped off a book. The front of each label has a free-hand illustration that hints the story in the back. The illustrative intention was to balance casual, everyday moments with their symbolic significance to a person’s life. The symbols were intensified by high contrast colors: Black and white for the book, red for the wine.

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Dash’s the coffee brand

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Dassyras is a family-owned coffee roaster founded in 1987 to produce artisan Greek and filter coffee. As the second generation entered the business, they began crafting a unique espresso blend of several different specialty coffee beans. Its distinctively rich taste and impressive aroma paved the way for the product to gradually become a bestseller in the wholesale market. But it was literally a no name brand. Yet every great product deserves a great name, logo and packaging! The name needed to be short, good-sounding, easy to remember and somehow connected to the family business name. So the name “dash” fulfilled all three criteria and sounded a lot like “Dassyras”. Most importantly though, the word brings to mind moments of pause and relaxation.

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Dash was placed in between two dashes to indicate a pause/break. Just like em dashes, which are used to indicate a break in sentence. Meanwhile a coffee drop stands still, creating the impression that it will fall any minute. To convey the brand’s authentic and micro-roasting personality, we designed and printed their business cards on brown kraft paper. Following the same handmade logic, we made by hand, one by one, Dash’s wood labels with the logo wood-burned into them.

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Moa Hunter honey packaging

Makuna honey, a variety of honey found in New Zealand and highly sought the world over, has been harvested by the Maori since ancient times. That history is reflected in the branding and packaging by agency Kallan & Co for Moa Hunter Prue Makuna HoneyEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

Each box is hand made, with Manuka oil brushed into the base, allowing for the aroma of the Manuka bushes to enhance the experience of opening the package. Each jar of honey is assembled by the family, with a hand-woven string and is then finished with a wax seal of the Moa Hunter logomark.

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Eco at heart packaging inspired by the Ocean

“Eco at Heart create beautifully designed reusable and environmentally-friendly products. A trip to Bali left brand founders Stu and Davina feeling shocked at the amount of plastic-covered beaches they encountered. They later learnt that Indonesia is the second-largest (after China) contributor of pollutants in the ocean and it was evident that single-use plastics, particularly straws – were the most problematic items.

With the ocean providing the main visual inspiration behind the brand, we took references from the coastline to develop the identity system. I created a series of watermark patterns to convey the organic essence of the business and convey a feeling of calm with soft shapes and natural textures.”

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Guilt-free chocolate?

Guilt-free chocolate just took on a whole new meaning thanks to Nestlé’ Japan replacing the plastic packaging on their miniature Kit Kat bars. 

Back in January, the beloved candy company announced that it would only use reusable and 100% recyclable packaging by 2025 and it looks like they’re beginning to make good on that promise. 

If you purchase the original, matcha and dark chocolate flavors of Kit-Kat miniatures, you will find the usual plastic wrapper replaced with origami paper. Kit-Kat is a hot commodity in Japan, with over 4 million units sold each day. The company includes instructions on how to take the paper and turn it into a crane, in a move that makes packaging sustainable and interactive. The shift in the material is said to decrease the company’s plastic use by 380 tons per year.

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New Skincare Line

To launch a skincare line in today’s oversaturated beauty market, you need to be confident that your target demographic will be on board. With the launch of Plenaire, a new UK-based brand, they’ve gone to the source, working closely with a Gen-Z focus-group that likely helped shaped HBO’s Euphoria as well?Editorial photographThe packaging for the line they developed with the help of design firm Pentagram skews minimal, with the tubes light, pastel-pink and signature lilac (named ‘Cresyl’ after the purple histological stain cresyl violet) with small particles to add a layer of texture. Minimalist, yet striking enough to work into your “shelfies,” the design of Plenaire comes elevated without being overly flashy. Their online presence is also minimalist and inclusive, as any brand speaking to Gen Z should be. Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Kebun packageing

Beniamin Pop Brand Architect created the typographically-driven packaging for Kebun, a Romanian restaurant that serves kebab.

“Kebun is a packaging made for Condimental, an award winning Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) chain from Bucharest, Romania. Condimental’s purpose is to reposition the kebab product in the consumer’s mind. How would they succeed? By creating THE NEW KEBAB – a fresh kebab in a box with special ingredients (pomegranate, aubergine, homemade sauces) and no flat bread. ”Editorial photographEditorial photograph“The name Kebun is a combined word from ‘kebab’ and ‘bun’ – which means ‘great, fine, pleasing’ in Romanian. The name has a very agreeable tune and its purpose was to underline a difference in regard to the regular kebabs found elsewhere along with the product’s high quality and healthy approach. While the competition is selling kebabs, Condimental is selling kebuns.”Editorial photograph