Tag Archives: package design

Skincare Yepoda focuses on clean rebrand

Kepoda’s skincare packaging, designed by OWLSOME STUDIO, introduces consumers to the ingredients inspired by accessible skincare. The packaging is simple, focusing on a clean and sophisticated design, highlighting a vertical logo that brings the user’s eye from top to bottom. Additionally, the color palette across the line is refreshing yet playful.

Over Easy

Over Easy is launching into the breakfast category with a line of simple, nutritious, and better-for-you breakfast bars in four morning-inspired flavors – Apple Cinnamon, Banana Nut, Peanut Butter, and Vanilla Matcha – with a bold, colorful look and message to match.

Viva water feel more like a treat

Viva Mineral Water’s packaging represents the distinct past of the resource of the beverage. Each bottle showcases the “four elements of nature” through a beautifully etched pattern on the glass bottle. Created by Prompt Design, the water’s packaging is sleek and refined, adding an element of surprise to a drink we know is vital to our lives.

Our design intention is to present the distinctiveness of mineral water resource through the “four elements of nature” concept by depicting the symbolic expression the “four elements of nature” as different patterns on the bottle surface. The embossing helps enhance the attractiveness and water purity reflection of the bottle as well as its luxury, high class and uniqueness in design.

Everyone loves Chocolate

Chocolate is a truly miraculous thing. The indulgent treat made from cocoa pods becomes a delicious food when mixed with other ingredients, such as sugar, fruit, or nuts. Unfortunately, most chocolate bars are made with refined sugars and stick to conventional ingredients.

Spring & Mulberry is a chocolate brand founded by Kathryn Shah and Sarah Bell to share more complex flavors beyond sweet, adding organic fruit, pollens, nuts, and spices, all sweetened with dates, a purportedly healthier alternative to refined sugars. Spring & Mulberry also uses organic ingredients whenever possible, and the bars are vegan save for lavender, bee pollen, and rose petal since it contains animal-derived pollen.

“The brief was to take the client’s product— date-sweetened chocolate—and build a brand supporting the concept of ‘exploring a world of sweet beyond sugar,’” said Allison Henry Aver, owner and creative director at Letter A, the agency behind Spring & Mulberry’s packaging. “We created the ‘land of Spring & Mulberry,’ where food and friends and feasts are abundant, good looking, and good-for-you. The land is showered in dappled light and dreamy sunsets, and from this, we took inspiration for our color palette, packaging, prints, and photography.”

The design is elegant, with fanciful and striking typography. The logo also makes tasteful use of Meek Display, with Brick DisplayClifton, and Nexus playing supporting roles. The mix of varying widths, round, and sharp edges shows complexity and craftwork, signaling a premium experience and product.

Baskin-Robbins

Baskin-Robbins has had a bit of an identity crisis the last few years. They’re still all about the ice cream they scoop up, ice cream cakes, sundaes, and shakes, but Baskin Robbins’ logo and branding haven’t delighted as much as its sweet, frozen treats. At the end of 2020, Baskin-Robbins introduced a new visual identity, replacing its maligned logo with a JKR-designed look, a definite step forward and inspired by “Living Flavorfully.”

Now, Baskin-Robbins has unveiled another logo and visual identity system, this time by creative agency ChangeUp (though, according to Baskin-Robbins, it hasn’t undergone a “major” brand refresh in decades). Time flies, supposedly, and recent events have likely distorted our perception of its passing, but the early 2021 refresh also included a new logo, visual system, and bespoke typeface.

“Baskin-Robbins is one of those brands with the unique potential to transcend generations. They wanted the branding to deliver the quality and creativity they’ve always offered but weren’t getting credit for,” explained Ryan Brazelton, ChangeUp CCO. “They needed to create a visual identity system that was exciting for people who grew up with them and future audiences as well.”

The new Baskin-Robbins logo turns to the brand’s visual history as inspiration for the new design. The brown and pink color combination is back, which sounds as gross as chocolate orange mayonnaise, but it works. The new logo keeps the oh-so-clever “31,” first introduced in 2006’s logo ( and held over in 2021). The type has a bit of the original’s circus feel, and the perfect circle shapes also recall the logo first introduced in 1947. Secondary typography is much more subdued in this refresh. Gone are the sharp angles, and the new type is less child-like and more mature, adding some soft lines that keep the new visual presentation casual and comfortable.

Packaging Makes A Statement Through Muted Tones And Type Driven Design

Typography and muted tones take precedence over Domaine Gélinas’ gin bottles. Designed by maubau studio, these gin bottles are highly crafted and almost feel like an antique in the best possible way. Instead of following design trends in the footsteps of other liquor companies, maubau studio is carving a path for Domaine Gélinas to stand out through outstanding design and a new perspective.

While the recipe let’s us taste the Gélinas know-how, the bottle lets us touch the place where it came to be. The wooden cap evokes the family land and the fauna that inhabits it; the embossing personifies attention to detail. The very shape of the object revives the memory of an ancient pharmacopoeia. It is a narrative object, a window into history.

Watercolor-Inspired Gradient For Superbloom

Designed by HATCH DESIGN, Grover Collaborative’s skincare line’s packaging is based on the powerful natural ingredients found within. As a result, the watercolor-inspired bottles instantly brighten and give a glimmer of brilliance.

Brighten, tighten, and protect your skin with some of the most powerful plants on earth. Watercolor was used to create an ethereal feel. This is meant to highlight the power of the plants to help transform the skin into one more beautiful and radiant. The bottles and containers share the same colors as their boxes. The two colors used to merge. As the material is made primarily of glass, it allows for light to pass through which gives it an inner glow. Details from product form to the unboxing experience aimed to harness the power of delight that naturally comes with a super bloom.

Jade Purple Brown Collaborated With Clinique’s 

Jade Purple Brown, a New York City-based artist known for her vibrant colors and lively illustrations, recently worked with Clinique to design the limited-edition packaging for the brand’s well-loved fragrance dubbed “Happy.” With energetic colors, lovely hearts, and a feminine box, the fragrance packaging is sure to give everyone a sliver of optimism.

SK-II colourful new packaging

Manchester creative agency Love was tasked with designing the concept, visual identity and packaging for the new limited-edition release by the skincare brand and its latest collaborator: The Andy Warhol Foundation.

Known for having an impressive assortment of ointments and lotions, Warhol had a unique point of view on beauty, which he expressed in statements such as, “If everyone isn’t beautiful, then no one is.”

The agency opted for a design aesthetic that tapped into another of the artist’s passions: broadcast media. He was at the vanguard of developments in television, for instance, even having his own MTV cable shows, and would regularly question the relationship between art and mass media.

Supplement based on Iodine

Medically related packaging is difficult as it’s hard to find the balance between approachable and trustworthy. Suprematika Branding Agency, however, has made the design look simple through their work for Iodine I2life. Through muted yet playful colors and straightforward typography, I2life’s packaging is polished yet friendly, ideal for a brand selling iodine supplements.

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All products are packed in bright, laconic packaging, where each element has its own color, which in a very simple form describes the composition of the product. The focus is on the iodine. It is consistently embedded in various style elements – mineral names or pictograms to visually demonstrate the effect of the product. Just as smoothly and easily, due to its structure, the drug is embedded in the human body.

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