&Walsh identity for SuperShe

Jessica Walsh and her team created a colourful visual identity for the women’s community app, eschewing the singular ‘girl boss’ stereotype often associated with feminist brands.

&Walsh, Jessica Walsh’s recently formed agency, was commissioned to work on the branding, strategy and merch for SuperShe. It’s a fitting project for the designer given that &Walsh is one of the 0.1% of design agencies founded, owned and run solely by women.

“When looking at other women’s communities, we realised that many of them were overly prescribing the way women in that community ‘should be’. Be a girl boss, travel the world and wear your nightly face masks.

The agency developed a custom brush font which aims to be “loud and confident” but also “friendly and fun”, according to Walsh, and is paired with secondary fonts Panamera and Bureau Grot.

tbh. Skincare

tbh. was created as a completely new and scientifically proven method for treating acne. Made Somewhere was engaged to develop the brand for tbh. and help launch it into the market, targeting a young female teenage demographic. Made Somewhere created a positive and youthful brand that flipped the negative connotations of acne and instead focused on taking back control and feeling confident in one’s own skin. Playful and energetic colours, bold typography and ‘spot/bubble’ motifs were used to create this confidence and positive energy. The brand was brought to life on the core range of products, including the brand’s signature acne cream, cleansers, cosmetic boxes, shippers and water bottles.

Studio Dumbar remands Brugge’s

Local football clubs have also been working to raise the profile of women’s football and attract new players to the sport. This week, Club Brugge’s women’s team revealed a new name and a slick visual identity created by Studio Dumbar (part of design agency Dept) and independent art director Ludovic Beun.

The rebrand sees the club renamed as Club YLA in honour of Yvonne Lahousse, a Brugge local and diehard fan. “[Lahousse] died in 2006 at the age of 91. She was the ‘mother of the Spionkop’ – the part of the stadium with the most loyal supporters. Her fanaticism was legendary; mere days before giving birth she could still be found behind the goal to cheer on the team,” says Studio Dumbar.

The design aims to reflect Lahousse’s “dynamic, passionate and energetic” spirit, and will be applied to merchandise as well as outdoor ads and digital communications. With its bold black-and-white colour palette, angular typeface and striking photography by Stig de Block, it’s a fresh and contemporary look – one that feels closer to campaigns from the likes of Nike and Adidas than it does to traditional football branding.

The logotype is used alongside Klim Type Foundry’s typeface, Söhne Breit, in communications: “We specifically choose Söhne to contrast the hard-edged logotype and layouts and create more tension. It’s contemporary and functional with clear letter forms,” adds Enebeis.

Photography, meanwhile, aims to reflect the club’s “down to earth attitude” and urban location, while the colour palette reflects the team’s core colours of black, white and blue.

New UNO packaging

What started as a design concept by Brazilian designer Walerson Oliveira has become a reality, as Mattel has made “UNO Minimialista” a physical thing you can now purchase.

After Oliveira’s concept created a buzz all over social media, Mattel took notice of the numerous callsfor the toymaker to produce the slick, minimal take on the classic card game, showing it off recently at the New York Toy Fair.Editorial photographThe deck utilizes a black back along with a restyled UNO logo and multicolor bar along the bottom for the packaging, while the front of the cards features a solid color, depending on the move. Minimal type and icons adorn the center and corners of the cards, and the deck follows the same gameplay as the same old UNO you know and love because if it ain’t broke, you don’t need to fix it.Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Dose & Co. poeder supplements

Editorial photographProtein & powders on-the-go has never looked so good thanks to Dose & Co. The cylinder packaging along with the color scheme of beiges deep blues speak to the natural ingredients in the powders. With Dose & Co. grabbing nutrition on your way out the door will become something you look forward to doing.

“In a world where everything’s getting rapidly more complex, it seems almost natural that there’s been a massive movement towards celebrating the simple and no-fuss. It’s not nostalgia – it’s just natural.”

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Pentagram uplifting brand for mental health

Created by Paula Scher and her team, the identity focuses on a ‘square peg in a round hole’ icon that signifies there is no normal when it comes to mental health.

“Cole’s hope was that everyone sometimes has emotional issues and that everyone needs to be able to feel like it’s OK to feel that way and to talk about it and get help if they need it,” Scher explains. “I equated that feeling of not being emotionally stable to feeling like a square peg in a round hole. I wanted to create a symbol and system that could be universally recognised and take away the sanitarium aspect of mental health.”

The icon illustrates that there is no ‘normal’ when it comes to mental health and that everyone fits despite how it might feel. Set in the typeface Druk by Commercial Type, the chunky black letterforms are set against a rainbow of colours, which has been applied to business cards, stationery, the website and a set of posters which feature powerful phrases.

The Druk typeface is used again here to signal its connection to the Coalition. Likewise a bright but slightly more varied colour palette has been applied to represent the broad spectrum of mental health conditions, while also capturing a sense of optimism and hope.

For Scher, she felt it was her and her team’s responsibility to create an engaging but safe space. “I think the graphics have to be powerful and accessible, not timid or sedate, and allow people to feel like it’s OK to come into the site and participate,” she says.

These days will pass

The Your Space Or Mine project gives artists and creatives a platform on the street, and Titchner’s colourful, typographic piece, titled Please Believe These Days Will Pass, is a “rallying cry for hope” and a bid to boost morale. With many of us still only leaving the house for essential food shops and daily exercise, the piece aims to be a welcome break from the “monotony of our current situation”.

“When the words ‘Please Believe These Days Will Pass’ first came to me in 2012 who could imagine the ‘days’ that we find ourselves in now? My thinking at the time was a message to help one endure through difficult times, but also a reminder to cherish what is good in the here and now,” explains Titchner. “It’s what is good, such as the bravery of those working so hard on our behalf in the NHS or the safety of our loved ones, that will get us through when the endurance runs low. I’m very thankful of the opportunity to share these words again in sites across the UK and hope as we all do these days will pass before too long.”

Ashmolean’s rebrand

As part of a strategy overhaul, the museum enlisted design studio Blast to create a new identity that would help to improve brand awareness and ultimately expand the museum’s reach – in terms of both the size and diversity of its audience.Ashmolean museumWarhol poster

First and foremost was the logo redesign, which is now represented by a crisp, geometric serif A complete with an extended crossbar, “inspired by the concept of a timeline”. The new logo is designed to create a “bold, recognisable symbol for the Ashmolean, a distinctive shorthand mark, recognisable at small sizes and from distance,” Tunnicliffe says.

“The logo is designed to form the cornerstone for typographiclayouts, signposting information, dates, events, art or artefacts,” he adds. The new logo was formed with flexibility in mind, giving freedom to adopt a range of layouts and, crucially, hitting the right notes across digital touchpoints – whether the Ashmolean’s online platforms or the information screens within the museum. Blast also developed a new tagline for the institution: ‘Inspiring minds, since 1683’.Ashmolean logoAshmolean exhibition postersBeyond the logo, the aspect of the overhaul that arguably jumps out most is the colour palette, which now welcomes flashes of colour akin to those seen in Pop Art. “We wanted a vibrant palette to keep communication fresh and engaging,” Tunnicliffe says. But it wasn’t a case of throwing away the history books altogether; hidden amongst the grabby colours are subtle allusions to the Ashmolean’s rich heritage. “The brand colour palette is inspired by the vibrant colours of the museum’s galleries, paired with the more subtle colours of the exterior stonework.”MerchandiseAshmolean identity in use across catalogues

Noosh

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tshirt-boxes.jpgNoosh is bringing the slow food movement into a fast food context with its delicious flatbreads and Mediterranean cuisine. While designing their brand, our founder happened to be participating in the prestigious Type Paris program, and was in the process of creating the font, Mademoiselle Didot. The luscious curvature of the font was a perfect match for Noosh – the word itself means ‘lovely, attractive’ in Farsi, and the ‘O’s mimic the movement of your mouth while saying its name. The final identity is elegantly simple and lays a beautiful foundation as this exceptional restaurant scales. If you’re in San Francisco, come experience Noosh for yourself!

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Find more here.

Qula colourful brand

QULA is a brand of kombucha tablets that contains live probiotics and hydration-boosting minerals that dissolve in regular water. Unlike most kombucha on the market, QULA is not pre-bottled, reducing its environmental footprint both in the reduction of packaging per serving as well as the reduction of distribution-related greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. Available in four flavors, QULA is a fizzy, slightly funky, soda alternative that is healthier and contains less than 1 gram of sugar per serving.Editorial photographEditorial photographThe packaging is dominated by one of four vibrant illustrations that range from namaste to funkadelic, with each flavor sporting its own design and every illustration with a color palette inspired by the kombucha flavor. Orange Mamba, QULA’s blood orange and rosemary flavor, features orange, red, yellow, and green against a sky blue background. Pink Sunshine, a raspberry cucumber flavor, makes use of purple, blue, pink, and green and gives off some very serious psychedelic vibes. Upriser, a mango pineapple mix, features green, yellow, and red. Finally, Queen of Cups, their guava rose variant, is dominated by purple and pink, with orange, yellow, and green in supporting roles. Other visual assets on the packaging are similarly tied to the kombucha flavors.Editorial photograph