McDonald’s minus the food

Many of McDonald’s recent campaigns, particularly those for France, have had a stripped-back, minimal aesthetic. Now TBWA\Paris has revealed a new set of minimalistic posters, which follow the popular sparkly Open Late campaign, launched just last month.The three posters in this campaign feature just the packaging of the brand’s three archetypal products – the Big Mac, the Nuggets and the French Fries. The brand takes minimalism to a new extreme with these posters which are devoid of any text, or even the actual product; just a few lonely crumbs.

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Work of Art For Your Kitchen

Inspired by Spanish floor tiles. Buenaventura designed the packaging for Cortijo Abades, a beautiful extra virgin olive oil.Cortijo-Abades-Aove-buenaventura-estudio.gifCortijo-Abades-Aove-buenaventura-estudio-03.jpg“The challenge was to be able to merge the ideas of tradition and origin with a modern and distinctive design which would eventually step away from the crowded mass. With the brand’s restyling and packaging design, we managed to level the consumer’s experience of tasting this impressive EVOO with experience of buying a unique and distinctive piece of art.”Cortijo-Abades-Aove-buenaventura-estudio-09.jpg

Milk Packaging of Pasteur

lavanderzoom.jpgCheck out this fresh packaging for good old milk. Pasteur is a conceptual approach to a range of flavored milk. The design is clear, eye-catching and a different approach to traditional milk packaging.set.jpg“Branding project for a conceptual premium milk drink that would be sold in bars and restaurants. A healthy alternative to alcohol-based drinks. The product range features several flavours: whole milk infused with lavender, honey sweetened whole milk and coconut milk.”cover.jpg

Typefaces of London

New type foundry launches with twelve fonts inspired by the capital, its buildings, language and traditions

Its first collection features fonts designed by the founders and a London Dingbat set by designer Peter Grundy. The set combines famous London landmarks, iconic designs and symbols with a set of London door numbers (added by Harpin).

Other fonts include London CircleLine, which Harpin says was inspired by the Post Office Double Line typeface designed by John Miles (who Harpin used to work for), the London Underground Roundel and Nancy Wyman’s designs for the Mexico Olympics in 1968.
London CircleLine by Paul Harpin
London Hoxton Square by Paul Harpin
London Fatface by Paul Harpin
London Modern by Paul Harpin
London Bloomsbury Old style by Paul & Patricia Hickson
London Belgravia Pro by Paul Hickson

SOS skincare for the woman who loves her skin

How beautiful is this branding?

“SOS is a new South Korean cosmetics brand that wants to help women with a daily skin care protection and routine. We created new branding for a set of makeup products that have premium quality for the luxury Asian market. The main features of this set are the skin masks for the healthy and perfect care of a woman’s daily treatment. 

With a clean look that is sophisticated and feminine, a color scheme of balanced and soft tones with gold bring a bit of luxury to the overall look without it being ostentatious. SOS is perfect for the women who love their skin and want to enhance their natural features.”

Cocoro Rooster

Cocoro Rooster is a chicken fast food restaurant that is guaranteed to make you smile. The mascot, an adorable, bug-eyed chicken, is fun and instantly recognizable, giving the brand a jolt of energy. Galilea Torres, the designer at Tropical Branding Lab behind the project, told us a bit more about creating Cocoro Rooster’s mascot, developing the bold design, creating something that would appeal to both kids and adults, and more.1.jpg1499817940495.jpeg1499818031712.jpeg

Rebrand for KIND Bars

“‘Do the KIND thing for your body, your taste buds and your world.’
This very ambitious mission statement wasn’t quite matching up with the products on the shelf.

A new logotype was created to more truly reflect the brand. Harsh grotesque all-caps characters were replaced with gentle curves and natural shapes.”

Photographer Giles Revell

In his new exhibition and book Cartographic Colour, photographer Giles Revell deconstructs flowers to reveal the beauty and the complexity of colour in nature. Working at Kew and the RHS Wisely garden, Revell photographed a selection of blooms which, using a grid placed over each image, he then set about analysing.In each square, Revell created graphic representations of the constituent colours of the flower concerned, revealing that what we might see as one strong colour, is often actually a combination of many. Cartographic Colour is divided in two. A series of ‘palettes’ reinterpret the colours of well-known flowers, abstracted to eliminate the distraction of form. Petals and stems are reduced to accurate graphic examinations of their constituent hues. “The plants were stripped of identity through the process of mapping, with the aim of creating a series of images where engagement is purely through scale, shape and position of colour,” Revell explains. “I was hoping to make arresting interpretations without the necessity of structure and form.”