Phoebe McCughley

“Basically, it’s 25 frames per second and it’s a very insane way of doing things, really,” says Phoebe McCaughley of her painstakingly crafted animations. Working with scraps of fabric and leftover packaging – which she uses to build her characters – McCaughley has found an innate talent for recreating natural movement. She’s also shown a deft hand for dealing with the big topics such as motherhood and mental health, which she manages to explore with an element of light-heartedness.

Not only is her work charming and relatable, it’s a reminder of just how enjoyable stop motion can be, when it’s done right.

New Skincare Line

To launch a skincare line in today’s oversaturated beauty market, you need to be confident that your target demographic will be on board. With the launch of Plenaire, a new UK-based brand, they’ve gone to the source, working closely with a Gen-Z focus-group that likely helped shaped HBO’s Euphoria as well?Editorial photographThe packaging for the line they developed with the help of design firm Pentagram skews minimal, with the tubes light, pastel-pink and signature lilac (named ‘Cresyl’ after the purple histological stain cresyl violet) with small particles to add a layer of texture. Minimalist, yet striking enough to work into your “shelfies,” the design of Plenaire comes elevated without being overly flashy. Their online presence is also minimalist and inclusive, as any brand speaking to Gen Z should be. Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Naomi Anderson-Subryan

Naomi Anderson-Subryan would spend a year trying to make it as an actor and another four years working in retail before realising that her calling was in the art world. After doing an art foundation at Camberwell College of Arts she decided to stay on to do a degree in illustration.

What is immediately clear from looking through the illustrator’s work is that she doesn’t take herself too seriously. Her ceramics experiments are brilliantly bonkers, in particular the three-part ‘play’ she created for her degree show, where characters including a ceramic piggy bank, Siamese cat and cowboy on horseback took to the stage.

Hollie Fuller

“I’ve loved to draw for as long as I can remember, so it makes sense that I ended up falling into illustration,” says Hollie Fuller. She started out studying fine art and photography at A-Level and delved into a bit of everything while on a foundation course before returning to her main love when she joined the Illustration course at Leeds Arts University.

Fuller’s pastel-hued illustrations have a knack of transforming everyday acts, such as using public transport, into scenes that are full of character, and have so far earned her commissions from the likes of art gallery The Hepworth Wakefield.

Hope is power

Creative agency Uncommon worked with the Guardian on its first brand campaign in seven years, which aims to highlight its reporting as a positive force for change.

The ad campaign centres around a butterfly, a symbol of both freedom and transformation. Bold, bright and stark, the posters place the focus on words and language, in an attempt to reinforce the sense of clarity and transparency that the Guardian aims to provide. Meanwhile, phrases like ‘Confused? Overwhelmed? Misled? That’s how they want you’, demonstrate an inevitably political slant, referencing other media outlets as well as politicians.

The butterfly allegory is brought to life in the accompanying campaign film by James Marsh, the Oscar-winning director behind The Theory of Everything. Here, the butterfly tirelessly bangs against a glass window in an attempt to escape to the outside world. As the lyrics of Anais Mitchell’s Nothing Changes solemnly sound out, the butterfly eventually bursts through the glass, where it joins a legion of others in freedom.

Anthony Burrill shows support for Extinction Rebellion

The designer has created a series of posters and graphics to support XR’s protests in central London, also joining supporters at a live printing workshop in Trafalgar Square.

Screenshot 2019-10-11 at 14.06.17.png

Designer Anthony Burrill has created a series of graphics and slogans to support this week’s action. He has also joined in with the protests, taking part in a live print workshop at Trafalgar Square on Wednesday.

His designs aim to encourage others to think about their own carbon footprint and the steps they can take to reduce their impact on the environment. “I was thinking about change and those small changes we can make to our lives that have a bigger effect when we all do them,” he explains.

With his use of bold type and bright colours, Burrill’s aesthetic feels like a natural fit with Extinction Rebellion’s visual identity. The group has become known for its striking graphics, posters and props, which draw inspiration from protest movements of the 50s and 60s.

Mental health photography

In the latest in a series of articles on visual trends, Stocksy’s Tara Campbell explores the rise of artists offering a more nuanced depiction of mental health issue.The campaign drew attention to the prevalence of what they termed “the ‘headclutcher’ photo. You know the one: you’re reading an article about depression, and at the top of the page, there’s a picture of a person holding their head in their hands. Although this can be an outward expression of despair, when poorly executed, it can come across as a mocking and reductive depiction of depression.

Athru new identity by JKR’s

After a difficult few decades, it seems Irish whiskey is having a moment. The number of distilleries in the country has grown from four to 24 in the past six years and sales are booming: Over 10.5 million cases were sold in 2018 (the highest figure since the pre-Prohibition era) and over 900,000 people visited distilleries for tours and tasting sessions.

One of the latest arrivals on the scene is Athru: a premium brand founded by Irish entrepreneur David Raethorne, who has spent the past five years turning a former video tape factory in Sligo into the Lough Gill Distillery.

JKR worked closely with Raethorne and his team to create the Athru brand. As the project is a long-term endeavour, JKR took inspiration from the idea of “an unfinished picture”, cutting the corners off letters and splicing together images of the local landscape.
It’s a striking approach – and one that stands out among a sea of brands using scripted typefaces and vintage logos. Sean Thomas, Creative Director at JKR, says the agency wanted to create something unique and looked to art galleries, museums and disruptor brands such as Aesop instead of Athru’s rivals for inspiration.

Gaddum rebrand

True North has stripped back Gaddum’s branding to the bare bones, basing the charity’s new tone and identity on the idea of a supportive friend.

Despite being one of the oldest charities operating in the Greater Manchester area, The Gaddum Centre’s rebrand is anything but traditional.

Established in 1833, the charity provides health and wellbeing support to the local people, primarily dealing with therapy, advocacy and advisory services.

The new branding, conceived by Manchester-based agency True North, resembles the simplistic, type-based design that currently prevails in tech start-ups. Here, it aims to give Gaddum a friendly, approachable demeanour, reflected in both its clean aesthetic and the choice of pastel hues.

Kebun packageing

Beniamin Pop Brand Architect created the typographically-driven packaging for Kebun, a Romanian restaurant that serves kebab.

“Kebun is a packaging made for Condimental, an award winning Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) chain from Bucharest, Romania. Condimental’s purpose is to reposition the kebab product in the consumer’s mind. How would they succeed? By creating THE NEW KEBAB – a fresh kebab in a box with special ingredients (pomegranate, aubergine, homemade sauces) and no flat bread. ”Editorial photographEditorial photograph“The name Kebun is a combined word from ‘kebab’ and ‘bun’ – which means ‘great, fine, pleasing’ in Romanian. The name has a very agreeable tune and its purpose was to underline a difference in regard to the regular kebabs found elsewhere along with the product’s high quality and healthy approach. While the competition is selling kebabs, Condimental is selling kebuns.”Editorial photograph