20 Wine bottles with a story

When we were asked to brand it and name it, it was that story-telling aspect of the wine that we wanted to bring to the surface. To do so, we decided to reinvent the bottle of wine so it could serve as a vessel for both a sophisticated liquid as well as for an engaging piece of literature. We named it Twenty Stories and created twenty unique labels with twenty unique stories, one for every year of LIDL in Greece.

The labels were printed on white, heavy, matte writing paper and were shredded on one side to give out the sensation of a real page that has been just ripped off a book. The front of each label has a free-hand illustration that hints the story in the back. The illustrative intention was to balance casual, everyday moments with their symbolic significance to a person’s life. The symbols were intensified by high contrast colors: Black and white for the book, red for the wine.

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Dan Reisinger

Dan Reisinger was born in Kanjiža, Yugoslavia, now Serbia in 1934. Much of his childhood was spent in hiding from the occupying Germans and having lost many family members in the Holocaust, including his father who died in a forced labour battalion of the Hungarian Army, in 1949 he and his mother immigrated to the nascent state of Israel.

Descended from four generations of painters and master-craftsmen, Reisinger soon found work as a housepainter. His sights, however, were set on acquiring a profession in the field of art and design. In 1950, former Bauhaus student Mordechai Ardon, Head of the New Bezalel School of Arts and Crafts, Jerusalem, accepted the eager 16 year-old into the school. Dan’s first poster for the national lottery was published in 1953, and a year later he won the Struck prize for the Bezalel’s most outstanding student.

Peace poster, 1968

Maccabiah Games poster, 1977

For 60 years, Reisinger’s memorable posters for the Habimah National Theatre, the Maccabiah Games, EL AL, the Israel Defence Force, and much more dominated Israel’s hoardings.

Poster for EL AL airlines, c. 1970

Poster for a performance of Julius Caesar, 1961

Always conscious of Bauhaus principles, Dan kept his work bold, straightforward and colourful. His three-dimensional and environmental designs were no exception. Israel’s Pavilion at Montreal’s Expo ’67, Tel Aviv’s seaside promenade, Bar Ilan university, medical schools, hospitals, buildings and industrial plants were given the brightly painted Reisinger treatment. His interactive calendars are masterpieces of paper engineering.

Poster for Israel Museum, 1976

Poster for the Post Office, 1965

Perpetual calendars for MoMA, 1987

Dash’s the coffee brand

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Dassyras is a family-owned coffee roaster founded in 1987 to produce artisan Greek and filter coffee. As the second generation entered the business, they began crafting a unique espresso blend of several different specialty coffee beans. Its distinctively rich taste and impressive aroma paved the way for the product to gradually become a bestseller in the wholesale market. But it was literally a no name brand. Yet every great product deserves a great name, logo and packaging! The name needed to be short, good-sounding, easy to remember and somehow connected to the family business name. So the name “dash” fulfilled all three criteria and sounded a lot like “Dassyras”. Most importantly though, the word brings to mind moments of pause and relaxation.

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Dash was placed in between two dashes to indicate a pause/break. Just like em dashes, which are used to indicate a break in sentence. Meanwhile a coffee drop stands still, creating the impression that it will fall any minute. To convey the brand’s authentic and micro-roasting personality, we designed and printed their business cards on brown kraft paper. Following the same handmade logic, we made by hand, one by one, Dash’s wood labels with the logo wood-burned into them.

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Minimalism McDonald’s

It can be risky to go minimalist in an ad campaign: what if your audience miss the point entirely and don’t realise who the ad is for? Yet McDonald’s has created a series of outdoor ads in recent years that have boldly expressed just how deeply the fast food brand is embedded in our collective consciousness.

Joining these are a new series of posters from Leo Burnett for McDonald’s UK, which abandon photographs of juicy burgers or crisp fries and instead simply opt for words. Surely an ad creative’s delight to work on, the posters prove that we need no more than text to get us feeling peckish. The campaign was created in collaboration with renowned typographer David Schwen, and clearly hark back to Schwen’s earlier series titled Type Sandwiches.

Penagram’s new identity for Fisher-Price

Created by Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity sits alongside a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy featuring the simple tagline: Let’s be kids.

Developed by Pentagram partner Emily Oberman, the refreshed identity coincides with a new brand strategy led by Wieden+Kennedy, which includes the mission statement “put the fun back into functional” and the “play back into playtime”. This is accompanied by a simple but effective new tagline: Let’s be kids.

The new identity centres on a simplified version of the brand’s historic red ‘awning’ mark, in which its four scalloped edges have been reduced to three. The logotype has been redrawn in all lowercase, with letterforms that are slightly more refined but still quirky. The hyphen between the names is now a semicircle, echoing the scalloped edge of the awning, as well as resembling a smile.

Working with type designer Jeremy Mickel, Oberman introduced a custom, semi sans serif typeface called Let’s Be Glyphs, which is partly inspired by the historic typeface Cheltenham, widely used in the toy maker’s early advertising and packaging.

An alternative typeface has also been developed called Let’s Be Glyphs Bouncy, which features rotated characters and an uneven baseline, while sans serif font Maax will be used as a secondary typeface.

Moa Hunter honey packaging

Makuna honey, a variety of honey found in New Zealand and highly sought the world over, has been harvested by the Maori since ancient times. That history is reflected in the branding and packaging by agency Kallan & Co for Moa Hunter Prue Makuna HoneyEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

Each box is hand made, with Manuka oil brushed into the base, allowing for the aroma of the Manuka bushes to enhance the experience of opening the package. Each jar of honey is assembled by the family, with a hand-woven string and is then finished with a wax seal of the Moa Hunter logomark.

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National Trust 125th anniversary ad

Credits:
Agency: Wieden+Kennedy London
Creative Director: Flo Heiss
Creatives: Derek Lui, Harry Ingrams
Executive Creative Directors: Tony Davidson, Iain Tait
Production Company: All Mighty Pictures
Director/DOP: Anthony Dickenson
Executive Producer/Creative Director: Mark Harbour
Design Director: Karen Jane
Lead Designer: Alex Thursby- Pelham
Designer: Xueling Wang

Eco at heart packaging inspired by the Ocean

“Eco at Heart create beautifully designed reusable and environmentally-friendly products. A trip to Bali left brand founders Stu and Davina feeling shocked at the amount of plastic-covered beaches they encountered. They later learnt that Indonesia is the second-largest (after China) contributor of pollutants in the ocean and it was evident that single-use plastics, particularly straws – were the most problematic items.

With the ocean providing the main visual inspiration behind the brand, we took references from the coastline to develop the identity system. I created a series of watermark patterns to convey the organic essence of the business and convey a feeling of calm with soft shapes and natural textures.”

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VW waves goodbye to the Beetle

The spot, titled The Last Mile, is created by ad agency Johannes Leonardo and set to a version of Let It Be by The Beatles sung by a children’s choir. It is bathed in nostalgia for the Beetle, with references to its place in pop culture history included throughout.

It might seem odd for a brand to put so much emphasis on a product that is no longer available to buy, but the release of the ad forms part of an ongoing marketing push by VW to move on from the global diesel emissions scandal that severely damaged its reputation in 2015.

The new ad follows a previous campaign that aims to highlight its move into electric vehicles. As with The Last Mile, those ads also leverage the brand’s glorious past.

Electric vehicles are not mentioned explicitly in the Beetle spot though there is a lengthy scene that references environmentalism via wind power and the closing tagline – ‘Where one road ends, another begins’ – is an attempt to look to the future. The hope is clearly that the big love for Volkswagen that the world once had can be used to redeem its standing with consumers and allow both the brand – as well as its products – to move on from its difficult last few years.

Credits:
Agency: Johannes Leonardo
Production company: Nexus Studios
Director: Fx Goby

OKCupid

The dating app’s ads highlight the issues that matter most to its users – and tell us it’s OK to choose partners based on their political views.

OKCupid’s Ask Yourself campaign tackles the subject head on, with a series of ads that tell us it’s OK to select partners based on their political leanings, their attitudes towards gender or even their views on abortion. Outdoor posters feature lines such as ‘It’s OK not to date a man who won’t vote for a woman’ and ‘It’s OK to choose to only date someone who’s pro-choice’.

Featuring artwork by Xaviera López, it was created by Mekanism and follows Wieden+Kennedy’s witty DTF ads, which offered some surprising new takes on an acronym that has become ubiquitous on dating apps.