Tag Archives: type design

Virgin Money rebrand

There has been a movement among traditional financial institutions to adopt a more human persona in recent years – largely thanks to younger, cooler challenger banks like Monzoand Starling snapping at their heels.

Virgin Money approached Pentagram’s Luke Powell, Jody Hudson-Powell and Domenic Lippa to create a fresh look to go with its new proposition, as a brand that shares Virgin’s core values but happens to be in banking, as opposed to a financial brand that happens to be part of Virgin.

The new identity looks to move the brand firmly away from the often faceless, corporate look favoured by many financial services companies, and reflect a customer-focused approach to banking.

The design team created a bespoke mono-linear wordmark, with the wider Virgin Money headline font family being built from this geometric logo.

“The overall construction is a balance of geometric curves, nuanced humanist forms, and hard edges and angles, creating a visual form that references Virgin Money’s functional and pragmatic side while embodying its people-centred approach,” says Pentagram.

The instantly recognisable Virgin red is used as the brand’s primary colour, alongside a secondary colour palette of bright blue, purple and white.

A refreshing new look for the East London Liquor Co

Founded in 2014, Bow-based distillery the East London Liquor Co produces a range of spirits. Already a firm favourite among bartenders, the distillery approached branding agency Ragged Edge to refresh its visual identity in order to help it appeal directly to drinkers.

“We helped them build a brand that’s unpretentious, unapologetic, and unabashed in its flagrant disregard for convention.” says Ragged Edge co-founder Max Ottignon.

The agency created a custom typeface with with NaN Foundry, which is made more unique with glyphs inspired by the local area, the distillery itself, and the production process.

A fluorescent yellow ‘smiler’ icon is inspired by an old crest found in nearby Victoria Park, and incorporates the shape of the River Thames to create a unique smiley emoji.

The identity has been brought to life on East London Liquor Co’s existing product ranges and several new ones, which are tied together using a vibrant colour palette and abstracted graphics.

Australian Centre for the Moving Image rebrand

As the Australian Centre for the Moving Image enters a new era, the museum has revealed a fresh look created by design studio North.

When the museum reopens in early 2021, it will have a fresh look devised by UK design agency North, which will complete ACMI’s transformation from its beginnings as a local film centre in the 1940s to the most visited museum of its kind.

ACMI branding by North

At the heart of the identity is a distinctive new wordmark, which is squared off at the edges for an impactful boxy effect that lends itself well to a grid system. The ‘m’ subtly calls to mind the shape of a video cassette, and makes for a far more memorable logotype than its somewhat corporate predecessor. A new typeface, Px Grotesk, has also been introduced to the suite to be used across all touchpoints.

North worked closely with ACMI’s in-house design team on the identity, which features a streamlined colour palette that enhances the vibrant imagery used across the museum’s cultural programme. The update comes with revamped signage, merchandise and campaign assets, as well as a new website created by Liquorice and internal wayfinding by Büro North.

Branding an Olympic athlete

While gymnastics is Tulloch’s main focus, he is also keen to build a platform beyond competitive sport – whether through mentoring young athletes and working with youth groups or launching his own range of clothing and merchandise. For someone who grew up looking up to athletes like Cristiano Ronaldo, Roger Federer and Michael Jordan, success isn’t just about winning medals or standing on the podium – it’s also about using your platform to inspire and motivate others and having a wider cultural impact.

“It’s always been my dream and my goal to have a brand,” he tells CR. “I look at people like Ronaldo and Jordan and their brand and what they have … and they’re more than an athlete or a sportsperson,” he tells CR. “I love inspiring people, I’m into fashion, I’ve got a lot more that I want to do outside of gymnastics as well, so that’s something I’ve always wanted.”

Thanks to a collaboration with branding agency JKR, Tulloch now has his own visual identity, and a soon-to-be-released clothing range featuring upbeat phrases inspired by his attitude to sport. The identity launched earlier this year, and Tulloch hopes it will help him build his profile and reach a wider audience outside of gymnastics.

Createing a better future for every child

NCB approached Lantern to help redefine and articulate its mission both internally and externally. We delivered a strategic and creative toolkit, covering everything from a boilerplate summary statement, to a brand manifesto, a new set of values, a clearer process and of course a new identity – all designed to define the brand with clarity and conviction.

LANTERN_NCB_LOGO_COLOUR.jpg

Following a series of stakeholder workshops, they developed a new strategy to better articulate the charity’s point of difference. Their first step was to reframe the sense of unity within the organisation. Previously, ‘United for a better childhood’ meant being united internally, which wasn’t a compelling story for fundraising. Our research revealed NCB did far more than this – uniting central and local government, charities, schools, the media, and society as a whole. This meant they weren’t just impacting on the lives of individual children, but the lives of an entire nation.

The logo captures the very essence of ‘United for a better childhood’. A star, a jumping figure, an upwards arrow – the symbol provides a refreshed energy and sense of optimism.

NCB logo design process by LanternDesign of NCB app displayed on iPhoneNCB badge of Logo designed by Lantern

A bespoke, illustrated typeface builds on the concept of many elements uniting, whilst the illustration style provides the opportunity to communicate complex issues in a simple and intelligent way.Bespoke designed typeface for the National Children's Bureau

The new brand is flexible enough to appear playful and engaging, whilst also being able to communicate to government officials and policy makers. As well as flexing for different audiences, the brand system is designed to work for both print and digital applications.NCB supporting logo graphic

Home-made-Brochure_SMALLER.jpgNCB logo design on window

Love Wellness redesign

So Bosworth decided to consult the experts and invent a better approach—and in 2016 she launched Love Wellness, a line of curated body-positive health products for women.

The brand has had a couple different identities over the years, but hit its stride with its latest look, created by Lobster Phone and released this spring.

The San Francisco–based design firm delivered a new identity, website, packaging and creative strategy.

As Lobster Phone writes, “Inspiration for the logo was found in a late 1930s Art Deco type specimen; it felt playful, chunky and expressive. We used this as the basis for creating custom letterforms that are both clear and iconic. As illustrations are foundational to the larger brand, we made the ‘V’ of the logo into a face with lips that kiss and talk. Each product has its own quirky name, corresponding illustration and color combination that provide a not-so off-the-shelf look. The illustrations play off the style of the logo’s lips—an almost Japanese pop aesthetic—clearly demonstrating the benefits of the product in a dynamic way.”

Love_GoodToGlow.jpgLove_PackagingLineup.jpgLove_BizCards.jpgLove_WildPosting.jpg