Tag Archives: rebrand

Insurance firm Next get new branding by Collins

Next’s new branding and tone of voice are designed to steer clear of the clichés surrounding insurance companies, which “are either your overly earnest protectors from doom, or rely on the absurdity of animals and athletes to help you remember them”, according to design agency Collins, which led the brand redesign.

The team took an illustrated approach to the brand visuals, which feature bright palettes and a cast of friendly, motivational characters, including a toolbox and a chef’s hat.

The new branding includes a tagline imploring small business owners to ‘get going’ and messaging that focuses less on risk and more on opportunity.

Next has also commissioned small business owners and creators around the US to contribute to its corporate apparel and gift items, photography and videography, and custom on-hold music.

CALM

CALM is known for its headline-grabbing campaigns, such as Project 84, which saw 84 sculptures line the rooftop of the ITV building on London’s Southbank to represent the number of men who take their own lives each week.

The charity has now launched a new film, Stay, which relays moving anecdotes and experiences of bereaved family members as well as survivors. The film comes as the charity reveals its new branding led by design studio Output, with language developed by Reed Words. Output worked on CALM’s new brand identity for around six months from start to finish, and a new web platform is also in the works.

“The previous brand had great equity and was loved by many, but it was created for print, then applied to digital spaces. Refreshing it gave an opportunity to design the core identity with rigour across all formats: online, offline and beyond,” she says. “It meant we could consider accessibility, particularly around access to the most vital services like the webchat and helpline, alongside expressive communications which would allow more freedom” says Output partner and creative director Johanna Drewe.

The visual identity draws on high intensity palettes featuring flashes of neon, and is capped by a refreshed wordmark. In the new design, the charity’s name is aligned to highlight the CALM acronym, however it retains the speech bubble concept seen in its predecessor.

“The brand has to do so many different things, from support to activism, but it needs to always feel like CALM. We were also conscious that it should feel like a natural evolution – the next iteration of a much-loved brand, rather than something completely new,” Drewe says.CALM branding on postersstudio-output.com; thecalmzone.net

PT’s Coffee Roasting Co.

PT’s Coffee Roasting Company, established in 1993 in Topeka, Kansas was in need of a brand refresh as they celebrated their 25th anniversary. As we approached the brand identity re-brand, we were truly inspired by PT’s passion for exceptional coffee from seed to cup. It was important for the new identity to reflect their love of coffee from their direct trade relationships with the farmers to the retail clientele.

The inspiration behind the updated PT’s mark and identity happened on a visit to PT’s Coffee headquarters in Topeka, Kansas. Less than two miles from PT’s roasting facility, we drove by a herd of bison grazing on the Kansas prairie. The bison of the great plains represents strength, unity and abundance. PT’s wanted their new identity to be reflective of these same values as well and connect to their Midwest roots. The design style reinforces the hand-crafted nature of PT’s products—making their brand more approachable and memorable in the market.

Rochester Rhinos FC rebrand

Ahead of the 2022 season, Rochester Rhinos has launched a complete rebrand, including a change of name to Rochester New York FC, which steers it away from varsity-like naming conventions and more firmly into the world of soccer.

The rebrand was led by London-based agency A New Kind of Kick, which has been working on the project in both the US and the UK for the past year, including consulting with fans and key ambassadors for the club.

Along with the change of name, the club’s new badge features curvilinear details designed to evoke High Falls, a waterfall at the heart of the city, replacing the rhinoceros emblem that was previously central to the crest.

The waterfall symbolism carries through to design of the kit numbers, which have been adapted from the primary typeface, Knockout, to mimic the three lines seen on the badge.

The new branding is complete with a refreshed palette, trading the former dark green and mustard for a mint and slate combination, and a range of promotional assets that play with graphics and tap into the current trend of repeating type.

Breeze rebranded

Leeds City Council has run Breeze for the past 20 years, offering activities, events and discounts to under 19 year-olds across the city. To coincide with the launch of a new membership app, it commissioned Kiss Branding to refresh the identity of the platform, to take in a diverse audience of toddlers, kids and teens plus also parents and tourists in the city.

Kiss Branding created a contemporary campaign featuring bright and bold typography and illustration, created in-house. “We landed on the concept of ‘Freedom’s a Breeze’ as a core brand idea,” says Poonam Saini, creative director at Kiss. “Breeze makes finding activities and discounts in Leeds ‘easy breezy’ so it was important that our new brand embodies this sense of simplicity and contentment.

“The swooping logo and typography, playful yet refined colour palette along with contemporary, inclusive illustrations come together to create a brand worthy of the Breeze offering – a world away from the typical ‘town council’ identity they had previously.”

National Museums Liverpool new branding

National Museums Liverpool has unveiled an updated visual identity designed to bring together its various institutions, which under the previous disparate branding left visitors unaware that the venues were all part of the museum group.

The new branding by design agency SomeOne covers seven of the city’s museums: Museum of Liverpool, World Museum, International Slavery Museum, Maritime Museum, Walker Art Gallery, Sudley House and Lady Lever Art Gallery. It also elevates the group’s sub brands Hosted By, its corporate events arm, and House of Memories, its dementia awareness initiative.

The new identity revolves around a waveform symbol which when highlighted reveals the letters NML upon close inspection. While these initials might not be immediately clear to the casual passer-by, it comes to life in animations. SomeOne also developed a new black, white and fuchsia palette, a set of icons, and a brand tagline for National Museums Liverpool, which promises to be ‘never dull’.

Beatport rebrand

Beatport, which was founded in 2004, offers a vast catalogue of buyable tracks as well as a chart, and several sub brands including Beatport Link – which allows DJs to build and stream playlists.

The redesign is the first brand update for Beatport since 2012, and marks a move away from the company’s headphones motif, which has been in use since the company’s founding. The new ‘endorsing marque’ symbol borrows heavily from the shapes of vinyl records and styluses, and accompanies an updated wordmark.

Beatport had previously used a slightly squashed, futuristic-looking typeface for its identity, which has been replaced with a more sedate sans serif that the studio says can be combined with various type expressions and tailored to different categories of music.

Shelter launches new ad campaign

Shelter’s new brand identity is created by Superunion and features a red arrow formed by brushstrokes. The intention is to bring a sense of the activism that was at the heart of the charity when it was formed in the 1960s back to the logo, while still referencing the shape of a roof which was a central part of Shelter’s previous mark.

The new ad campaign is created by ad agency Who Wot Why and features imagery of real people affected by the housing emergency projected onto buildings and homes. It is set to a track by Wretch 32.

The film is accompanied by a striking set of outdoor, print and online ads, featuring bold text and striking black-and-white portraits shot by photographer Tom Cockram.

The campaign, and new identity, aim to return some urgency and fight to the charity’s messaging, emphasised by the tagline, Fight for Home. “The housing emergency has escalated to staggering levels, impacting the lives of one in three of us,” says Willow Williams, head of marketing at Shelter. “Meanwhile, the global health crisis has made things a whole lot worse. This situation demanded an urgent and unflinching campaign to inspire everyone to join Shelter in the fight for home.”

Credits:
Brand purpose and Identity: Superunion and The Sustainability Practice at Ogilvy
Ad agency: Who Wot Why
ECD/Founder: Sean Thompson
Creatives: Jack Walker, Ali Dickinson, Rebecca Conyngham-Hynes, Dan Scott
Photographer: Tom Cockram
Production Company: Independent Films
Directors: Sarah Gavron, Anu Henriques

Mind rebrands

DesignStudio has updated the mental health charity’s branding, creating a new colour palette and drawing on the organisation’s logo to create a set of squiggly punctuation and design elements.

It’s been ten years since Mind last updated its branding, and in that time the mental health crisis has become more pressing – only exacerbated by the events of the last year.

DesignStudio says it was time for the organisation to recapture its “fighting spirit” with refreshed branding that would help expand Mind’s reach. Established in 1946, the organisation supports those facing mental health challenges as well as raising awareness and lobbying for change. DesignStudio’s new palette revolves around a brighter version of Mind’s blue, used alongside a pastel pink, minty green and bright coral.

“We wanted to build on existing elements but broaden Mind’s appeal for today’s diverse audience,” says DesignStudio creative director Vinay Mistry. “After extensive research with employees, volunteers and people with lived experience, we brought fresh thinking to the visual toolkit.”

Perhaps the most charming bit of the refresh is the squiggly punctuation DesignStudio has introduced – inspired by Mind’s existing symbol, and made using hand-drawn illustrations created by the studio team. Farmer describes the update as “more modern, diverse, accessible and legible” – all of which feels essential for the organisation to keep connecting with, and helping, people across the UK.

Kodansha rebrand for first time in 112 years

The Tokyo-based publisher Kodansha owns several literary and manga magazines, and first published much-loved manga series Akira in the early 1980s. It also released some of Haruki Murakami’s earliest novels, as well as manga series Attack on Titan, which was published in 31 serialised volumes, 100 million copies of which have been issued.

The new identity and logo is Kodansha’s first brand update in over 100 years, and is themed around a fresh statement of purpose: inspire impossible stories. Gretel’s work is reminiscent of art gallery or cultural institution branding, featuring an elegant new logo made up of intersecting lines in a square – a nod to the layout of comic book pages.

“The brand logo represents Kodansha’s position at the crossroad of all cultures, where many ideas, voices and stories intersect,” says Gretel creative director Sue Murphy. “It’s also inspired by Japanese hankos, acting as a stamp of quality on Kodansha’s content, as well as a monogram.”

Kodansha CEO Yoshinobu Noma describes the rebrand as an opportunity to “communicate who we are on a global scale”, suggesting it’s an attempt to help spread Kodansha’s profile outside of Asia.