Tag Archives: posters

Dan Reisinger

Dan Reisinger was born in Kanjiža, Yugoslavia, now Serbia in 1934. Much of his childhood was spent in hiding from the occupying Germans and having lost many family members in the Holocaust, including his father who died in a forced labour battalion of the Hungarian Army, in 1949 he and his mother immigrated to the nascent state of Israel.

Descended from four generations of painters and master-craftsmen, Reisinger soon found work as a housepainter. His sights, however, were set on acquiring a profession in the field of art and design. In 1950, former Bauhaus student Mordechai Ardon, Head of the New Bezalel School of Arts and Crafts, Jerusalem, accepted the eager 16 year-old into the school. Dan’s first poster for the national lottery was published in 1953, and a year later he won the Struck prize for the Bezalel’s most outstanding student.

Peace poster, 1968

Maccabiah Games poster, 1977

For 60 years, Reisinger’s memorable posters for the Habimah National Theatre, the Maccabiah Games, EL AL, the Israel Defence Force, and much more dominated Israel’s hoardings.

Poster for EL AL airlines, c. 1970

Poster for a performance of Julius Caesar, 1961

Always conscious of Bauhaus principles, Dan kept his work bold, straightforward and colourful. His three-dimensional and environmental designs were no exception. Israel’s Pavilion at Montreal’s Expo ’67, Tel Aviv’s seaside promenade, Bar Ilan university, medical schools, hospitals, buildings and industrial plants were given the brightly painted Reisinger treatment. His interactive calendars are masterpieces of paper engineering.

Poster for Israel Museum, 1976

Poster for the Post Office, 1965

Perpetual calendars for MoMA, 1987

Julien Hébert

Julien Hébert is a graphic designer based in Montréal, Quebec. His work is recognisable thanks to its bold typographic and colour choices.

T-shirt for the Manifeste contre la peur tour by Violett Pi. Designed by Julien Hébert and David Beauchemin, 2017.T-shirt for the Manifeste contre la peur tour by Violett Pi.
Designed by Julien Hébert and David Beauchemin, 2017.

Poster for the 2017 ATypI conference. Custom lettering and logotype designed by Julien Hébert, 2017.Poster for the 2017 ATypI conference. Custom lettering and logotype
Designed by Julien Hébert, 2017.

Album cover for Violett Pi. Designed by Julien Hébert and David Beauchemin, 2017.Album cover for Violett Pi. Designed by Julien Hébert and David Beauchemin, 2017.

Animation randomly displayed on the landing page of Studio Paprika’s website. Designed by Julien Hébert at Paprika, 2015.Animation randomly displayed on the landing page of Studio Paprika’s website.
Designed by Julien Hébert at Paprika, 2015.

View more of Julien work here

Smoke free Britain

In the 1970s and 80s, artist and designer Biman Mullick distributed thousands of posters highlighting the harmful impacts of smoking and passive smoking. With his work featured in a new exhibition at the Wellcome Collection.

Anti-smoking poster by Biman Mullick / Cleanair. Images courtesy of the Wellcome CollectionIn the 1970s, Biman Mullick was teaching at an art school in England when he became concerned about the dangers of passive smoking. At the time, smoking indoors was commonplace and almost half (45%) of the UK’s adult population were cigarette smokers. Doctors had already established a link between smoking and lung cancer but little was known about the consequences of inhaling second-hand smoke.

Mullick was not a smoker but became concerned that if smoking was bad for you, then passive smoking might be too – so he created a set of posters asking students not to light up in his classrooms. He printed them out in black and white and put them up around the college but was quickly asked to remove them by the prinicipal. “There was no law against smoking in the classroom … and he said that smoking was a part of British culture,” says Mullick.

He sent his posters to newspapers and public health authorities, who immediately took notice. “Health operatives had started noticing that smoking should not be permitted in hospitals and health buildings, and they started buying my posters,” explains Mullick. Within a few years, his posters were in use throughout the country and by 1984, he had distributed 186,000 of them.

Most were distributed in hospitals, schools and colleges. They also appeared in the background in several TV shows.

Mullick’s designs are striking: the influence of Indian visual culture is evident in his work and his posters combine bold colours with hard-hitting phrases and playful illustrations. One reads ‘smoking is slow motion suicide’ and features an image of a deceased turtle with a cigarette in its mouth while another warns that ‘passive smoking kills’.