Tag Archives: package design

PT’s Coffee Roasting Co.

PT’s Coffee Roasting Company, established in 1993 in Topeka, Kansas was in need of a brand refresh as they celebrated their 25th anniversary. As we approached the brand identity re-brand, we were truly inspired by PT’s passion for exceptional coffee from seed to cup. It was important for the new identity to reflect their love of coffee from their direct trade relationships with the farmers to the retail clientele.

The inspiration behind the updated PT’s mark and identity happened on a visit to PT’s Coffee headquarters in Topeka, Kansas. Less than two miles from PT’s roasting facility, we drove by a herd of bison grazing on the Kansas prairie. The bison of the great plains represents strength, unity and abundance. PT’s wanted their new identity to be reflective of these same values as well and connect to their Midwest roots. The design style reinforces the hand-crafted nature of PT’s products—making their brand more approachable and memorable in the market.

And

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And emerged in response to the question “How might we create a gender neutral brand identity for a line of period products?” Through extensive market research and brand discovery process, the identity of And began to take shape as an inclusive, high quality product line committed to meeting the needs of people with periods and disrupting outdated gender norms in the industry. And, inspired by the word ‘androgynous,’ is for him and her and them and you—And is for all of us. 

Gender dysphoria is defined as distress caused by a discrepancy between a person’s gender identity and their anatomy. For some trans, non-binary, and gender-nonconforming people, the experience of menstruation can trigger intense feelings of gender dysphoria, as many associate menstruation with femininity. This association perpetuates harm, as not all women menstruate and not all people who menstruate identify as women. The menstrual care industry plays an important role in redefining gender norms by exemplifying inclusive representation.

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Laytown

Laytown is a village in County Meath, Ireland, overlooking the Irish Sea. Inspired by this village’s location, the branding for Laytown Soda Co is all things tropical. Designed by Jack McKeon, the color palette for the drinks is cheery and bright, everything you hope to feel while by the sea. Furthermore, the t-shaped logo doubles as an illustration of a beach umbrella, furthering the seaside theme. It’s evident that Laytown Soda is a brand that’s all about influencing a lifestyle that promotes a slow pace and 100% happiness.

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A student project with Creative Direction from Dublin-based illustrator and designer Conor Merriman, the hypothetical Laytown Soda Co, based in County Meath, Ireland, put an emphasis on flavour over fizz. Their drinks offer fruity refreshment without being overpowered by an excessive sparkling sting.

The logotype, inspired by Laytown’s seaside location, features wavy letterforms and the letter ‘T’ doubling as an umbrella (or parasol considering how changeable the Irish weather is).

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WILD IS MAKING PERSONAL CARE MORE SUSTAINABLE.

There’s been a huge boom in demand for products that are kind to both our bodies and the planet in recent years. The vegan cosmetic industry is expected to be worth a whopping $21.4 billion by 2027, according to a recent report by Marketglass, while refillable packaging services such as Loop are fast becoming the poster children for zero-waste packaging.

Packaging as sweet as it gets

If you’ve never had the pleasure of tasting a Brookie, a brownie, and a cookie in one, you’re severely missing out. Biting into one is like biting into a piece of heaven.

The pillowy texture and the rich nostalgic flavors make for the perfect sweet treat. With branding and packaging designed by Blank Design Studio, Brookies, the Brazil-based sweets and coffee shop has created an irresistible identity system. The vibrant color palette paired with the 1950s-inspired illustrations and typeface makes for a sweet escape.

Through the positioning strategy, we identify territories and differentials to explore in the minds of already fanatical Brookies customers. The good and warm nostalgia. Guided by this concept, a vibrant color palette and the “baking good times” tagline, we created an authentic, global, urban, fun platform with a touch of acid humor brought by its new symbol, inspired by the 1950s cartoons that explored an atmosphere of cunning and malice through their exaggerated and flashy expressions. A project as delicious as the best cookies in town.

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GTAC’s Lab-Cultured Meat

Cultured meat may seem like something possible in the distant future, but commercially available lab-grown meat is already a reality. Late last year, Singapore became the first nation to approvesynth-meat, and Eat Just is currently serving up cultured chicken nuggets as a trial in Singaporeunder the Good Meat brand. 

Although lab-grown meat is still a novelty, agency Idea Dolls recently embarked on a concept project for a hypothetical meat line, exploring how to brand such a product to the public. Dubbed “Good To All Creation,” or GTAC, the branding features some of the unique characteristics inherent to lab-created meat.

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GTAC’s branding has hints of consumer technology. There are scientific nods to comb through, and overall the tone is serious and optimistic about the future. The minimal packaging is sleek, cool, and it feels pretty darn new and shiny. The raised textures and tech-inspired colors reinforce GTAC’s science-powered products, and animal shapes get made up of smaller graphics of the same animal, another reference to the technical process of creating cultured meat from cells.

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Tuft The World Branding

Designed by Lucy Price and Melissa McFeeters, Tuft the World’s packaging is as artful and playful as the tools and materials that the company sells. The color hues, illustrations, and typefaces used throughout truly make the brand come to life and inspire consumers to make the world a more creative and imaginative place.

After a full discovery phase, we created a logo suite that reflects the spirit of the tufting community and can be used in endless applications. The process of tufting was an underlying inspiration for the brand—from the custom, wavy typemark, to the repeating name pattern and grid graphic. A vibrant color palette was influenced directly from the yarn colors within the Reflect line, while the logo badges represent the wide variety of rug shapes. Hand-drawn doodles and annotations take inspiration from the creative process itself, as many rug tufters tend to be multidisciplinary artists. 

In addition to custom print materials, user guides and packaging, the t-shirts and enamel pins allow the Tuft the World customers to show off their tufting pride.

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ALT Pizza Boxes

I’m all about a good take-out pizza. There’s just something nostalgic about walking through the front door of my house, pizza in hand, movie ready to watch. I know you know the feeling because, well, who doesn’t? Bravo designed the bright typographical pizza boxes for ALT pizza that look more like posters you’d hand on your walls than a home for a hot and cheesy pie. Creating multiple different styles for the boxes was thoughtful in that if people think like me, they’ll keep ordering until they’ve collected all the designs. Pizza branding should be a fun treat, and Bravo has done an excellent job of creating an entertaining branding experience.

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Le Patissier Packaging

It seems fitting that a pastry shop would have packaging that’s as delicious as the treats that lie within. Design & Practice created the identity for Le Patissier, and the result is a gourmet design system. The geometrically designed boxes and bags perfectly paired with color combinations that could be described as “drool-worthy” with bold yet straightforward typography is a match made in heaven. The Eiffel Tower might be a sight to see, but this packaging is a close second.

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Hotel Arcadia House Wine

2 AM Agency was contracted to develop the label’s design and packaging. The notion of simplicity, authenticity, and luxury were combined to create a simple, yet sweet face for the bottle. A brown paper is used for the label, extending up the length of the bottle, unlike a traditional bottle whose label typically makes up about a quarter of it. The typography is curved and eclectic, drawing attention to the otherwise completely blank label. The paper provides a tactile experience, while the hand written font identifying what type of wine it is, adds a sense of personalization. 

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ARCAD is a specialty wine sub-brand of Hotel Arcadia in Slovakia. Producing wine from the grapes they grow in their own gardens, they offer their clients/residents a bottle of wine to enjoy their evenings in a luxurious atmosphere. 

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