Tag Archives: logo design

Scouts new Squirrels

The Squirrels programme aims to support young people in deprived communities most affected by the pandemic and also bring in families that may be new to Scouts. Its branding is bright, playful and fun and features its own logo, featuring a squirrel as the ‘S’.

The logo will eventually be used alone, when the Squirrels brand is more established, but initially will be used alongside the distinctive Scouts symbol to show it is part of the same family. The colours of the brand are also an extension of the main Scouts colour palette of red and yellow, with a number of woodland-themed colours added.



“Our approach to the Squirrels brand idea was to go back to the beginning of the Scouts story – Brownsea Island,” says Jamie Ellul, creative director at Supple Studio. “It felt appropriate to use the island’s flora and fauna as inspiration for the visual language and colour – especially as Brownsea is home to a brood of rare red squirrels.

Rochester Rhinos FC rebrand

Ahead of the 2022 season, Rochester Rhinos has launched a complete rebrand, including a change of name to Rochester New York FC, which steers it away from varsity-like naming conventions and more firmly into the world of soccer.

The rebrand was led by London-based agency A New Kind of Kick, which has been working on the project in both the US and the UK for the past year, including consulting with fans and key ambassadors for the club.

Along with the change of name, the club’s new badge features curvilinear details designed to evoke High Falls, a waterfall at the heart of the city, replacing the rhinoceros emblem that was previously central to the crest.

The waterfall symbolism carries through to design of the kit numbers, which have been adapted from the primary typeface, Knockout, to mimic the three lines seen on the badge.

The new branding is complete with a refreshed palette, trading the former dark green and mustard for a mint and slate combination, and a range of promotional assets that play with graphics and tap into the current trend of repeating type.

Laytown

Laytown is a village in County Meath, Ireland, overlooking the Irish Sea. Inspired by this village’s location, the branding for Laytown Soda Co is all things tropical. Designed by Jack McKeon, the color palette for the drinks is cheery and bright, everything you hope to feel while by the sea. Furthermore, the t-shaped logo doubles as an illustration of a beach umbrella, furthering the seaside theme. It’s evident that Laytown Soda is a brand that’s all about influencing a lifestyle that promotes a slow pace and 100% happiness.

Editorial photograph

A student project with Creative Direction from Dublin-based illustrator and designer Conor Merriman, the hypothetical Laytown Soda Co, based in County Meath, Ireland, put an emphasis on flavour over fizz. Their drinks offer fruity refreshment without being overpowered by an excessive sparkling sting.

The logotype, inspired by Laytown’s seaside location, features wavy letterforms and the letter ‘T’ doubling as an umbrella (or parasol considering how changeable the Irish weather is).

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Beatport rebrand

Beatport, which was founded in 2004, offers a vast catalogue of buyable tracks as well as a chart, and several sub brands including Beatport Link – which allows DJs to build and stream playlists.

The redesign is the first brand update for Beatport since 2012, and marks a move away from the company’s headphones motif, which has been in use since the company’s founding. The new ‘endorsing marque’ symbol borrows heavily from the shapes of vinyl records and styluses, and accompanies an updated wordmark.

Beatport had previously used a slightly squashed, futuristic-looking typeface for its identity, which has been replaced with a more sedate sans serif that the studio says can be combined with various type expressions and tailored to different categories of music.

2026 Winter Olympics logo revealed

The logo, which features an angular version of a two and six, drawn in a single movement, was decided by a popular vote held online.

The logo is used in two different colourways – silver and mix of red, blue and green – to represent the Olympics and Paralympics Games respectively. The logo itself is created in one gesture, as the film below demonstrates. This does give it a sense of movement, though arguably also makes the numbers less legible.

“Milano Cortina 2026’s strategy for a people-centric Games builds on the belief that we are stronger together – evident in its engagement of the wider public in this decision-making process,” continues Essayah. “Its determination to make Italy fall in love with the Games and the world to fall in love with Italy has been evident throughout this global initiative. We’re certain this affection will continue to grow over the next five years, inspired by this unique emblem design.”

Kia unveils a new signature-inspired logo

The logo design features a parallel between the stem of the K and the diagonal stroke of the A, which now has the appearance of being italicised, arguably costing the wordmark slightly when it comes to legibility. Although the symmetry of the wordmark loses it some of its handwritten look, there’s a clear rhythmic quality – like a waveform or a heart rate graph – that taps into the idea of movement at the centre of the new strategy and slogan.

New Identity for wine connoisseurs SommSelect

While the world of wine, and particular sommeliers, has traditionally been characterised by stuffiness and exclusivity, SommSelect is making it more accessible via its subscription service and an ever-evolving online wine shop.

The rebrand comes off the back of huge growth amid the pandemic and the forced closure of bars and restaurants, with SommSelect’s wine club subscriptions up by 300% in the last six months alone.

Saks brought in Deva Pardue, formerly of Pentagram and The Wing, to lead the rebrand and draw in a new generation of more adventurous wine drinkers.

The refreshed visual identity nods to the sophistication of the sommelier experience, while also looking to elevate it to a more modern and approachable place.

A new logomark leverages the prominence of the letter ‘S’ in the company’s name to create an elegant, corkscrew-like letterform.

The wordmark is based on a customised version of the primary brand typeface, Canela by Commercial Type.

Liberty rebrand

The luxury department store has unveiled new branding by Pentagram’s Harry Pearce that borrows cues from the historic sign that first hung over the door.

Liberty logo by Pentagram

The new logo puts the name of the store front and centre, dropping the reference to its London home and instead moving it to additional brand assets alongside a redesigned crest. The iconic deep purple hue remains intact across the packaging design, while the gold seen across the lettering has been “refined”.

Liberty logo evolution

The new branding draws upon Liberty’s lengthy history, in particular the original sign used at its Great Malborough Street location, though the historic link may appear subtle to casual onlookers thanks to the identity’s decidedly sleeker look.

The connection to the past is established in smaller details like the full-stop, which has been reinstated on the wordmark as per the original sign. Meanwhile, the angular serifs have been dropped from the logotype in favour of a new sans-serif typeface similarly rooted in the original design.

“The process of rebranding Liberty has been one of craft, archaeology and refinement,” says Pearce. “The logotype itself hails from the lettering in the original sign above the Great Marlborough Street front door, carefully redrawn to make it the most authentic logotype in Liberty’s history.”