Tag Archives: logo design

2026 Winter Olympics logo revealed

The logo, which features an angular version of a two and six, drawn in a single movement, was decided by a popular vote held online.

The logo is used in two different colourways – silver and mix of red, blue and green – to represent the Olympics and Paralympics Games respectively. The logo itself is created in one gesture, as the film below demonstrates. This does give it a sense of movement, though arguably also makes the numbers less legible.

“Milano Cortina 2026’s strategy for a people-centric Games builds on the belief that we are stronger together – evident in its engagement of the wider public in this decision-making process,” continues Essayah. “Its determination to make Italy fall in love with the Games and the world to fall in love with Italy has been evident throughout this global initiative. We’re certain this affection will continue to grow over the next five years, inspired by this unique emblem design.”

Kia unveils a new signature-inspired logo

The logo design features a parallel between the stem of the K and the diagonal stroke of the A, which now has the appearance of being italicised, arguably costing the wordmark slightly when it comes to legibility. Although the symmetry of the wordmark loses it some of its handwritten look, there’s a clear rhythmic quality – like a waveform or a heart rate graph – that taps into the idea of movement at the centre of the new strategy and slogan.

New Identity for wine connoisseurs SommSelect

While the world of wine, and particular sommeliers, has traditionally been characterised by stuffiness and exclusivity, SommSelect is making it more accessible via its subscription service and an ever-evolving online wine shop.

The rebrand comes off the back of huge growth amid the pandemic and the forced closure of bars and restaurants, with SommSelect’s wine club subscriptions up by 300% in the last six months alone.

Saks brought in Deva Pardue, formerly of Pentagram and The Wing, to lead the rebrand and draw in a new generation of more adventurous wine drinkers.

The refreshed visual identity nods to the sophistication of the sommelier experience, while also looking to elevate it to a more modern and approachable place.

A new logomark leverages the prominence of the letter ‘S’ in the company’s name to create an elegant, corkscrew-like letterform.

The wordmark is based on a customised version of the primary brand typeface, Canela by Commercial Type.

Liberty rebrand

The luxury department store has unveiled new branding by Pentagram’s Harry Pearce that borrows cues from the historic sign that first hung over the door.

Liberty logo by Pentagram

The new logo puts the name of the store front and centre, dropping the reference to its London home and instead moving it to additional brand assets alongside a redesigned crest. The iconic deep purple hue remains intact across the packaging design, while the gold seen across the lettering has been “refined”.

Liberty logo evolution

The new branding draws upon Liberty’s lengthy history, in particular the original sign used at its Great Malborough Street location, though the historic link may appear subtle to casual onlookers thanks to the identity’s decidedly sleeker look.

The connection to the past is established in smaller details like the full-stop, which has been reinstated on the wordmark as per the original sign. Meanwhile, the angular serifs have been dropped from the logotype in favour of a new sans-serif typeface similarly rooted in the original design.

“The process of rebranding Liberty has been one of craft, archaeology and refinement,” says Pearce. “The logotype itself hails from the lettering in the original sign above the Great Marlborough Street front door, carefully redrawn to make it the most authentic logotype in Liberty’s history.”

Yale unlocks the sun

Founded in 1840, Yale began life as a New York-based manufacturer specialising in handmade bank locks. Today, it is one of the longest-running international businesses in the world, with million of Yale locks in use worldwide.

Yale’s refreshed visual identity includes a bespoke typeface by Jeremy Tankard and new UX, motion and sonic branding, all of which are centred around its distinctive sun-shaped logo. “We looked for something universal that would be understood around the globe. Yale already had a round yellow logo so that turned out to be a gift we could work from,” says GW+Co principal Gilmar Wendt.

“We landed on the sun as the core design idea because Yale is a warm and positive brand. You can rely on it always being there (even if you don’t see it) giving you peace of mind, and it is a big idea that is universally understood.”

The rebrand is currently rolling out internally, and will be seen externally later on in the year. For Wendt and the rest of the GW+Co team, the project has exemplified the challenges of rebranding a historic company like Yale for the digital era. “There is a need to create a future vision that builds on the past, rather than brushing it aside,” he says.

OneFootball

DesignStudio has created vibrant new branding for the football app, including an updated logo, a visual generator and a content strategy built around the idea of a ‘vibesmith’

“[OneFootball] needed a brand that adapted to Generation Z,” explains Vinay Mistry, design director at DesignStudio. “Generation Z is a generation of contrasts: they’re constantly adapting, they’re constantly changing, and football’s actually very similar. The rhythm of the game changes constantly as well. It made us think, actually there’s some lovely synergy there – can we define a personality for OneFootball that represents that?”

OneFootball identity by Design Studio

At the core of the project was the creation of a new logo. While researching the existing logo, the design team noticed its resemblance to the pictogramsdeveloped for the 1972 Olympic Games held in Munich, and also felt it was too similar to WhatsApp’s logo.

However, the team didn’t scrap the old logo altogether. Instead, they broke it down to its key parts – legs and football – and repurposed these elements into a new graphic forming a number one and a football in reference to the brand name. The new design is immediately more contemporary, partly because it does away with the gendered implications of the old logo.

OneFootball identity by Design Studio

Netherlands new identity.

As part of the country’s new identity, Studio Dumbar has designed a new wordmark for the Netherlands which gives a subtle nod to the national flower.

The wordmark combines the country acronym, NL and the tulip, the national flower. “The tulip is the most famous symbol of the Netherlands,” says Tom Dorresteijn, strategy director at Studio Dumbar. “But we wanted to steer clear of an obvious literal tulip as the symbol is too much connected to tourism and souvenirs.” Instead the team created a subtle silhouette of tulip petals between the N and the L letterforms.The typeface used in ‘the Netherlands’ element of the logo is Nitti Grotesk, designed by the Dutch type foundry Bold Monday. “This idiosyncratic typeface has warmth and humanity. The long ascenders give this font its particular character, which works really well with the logo,” explains Dorresteijn. “For us [the logo] expresses simplicity, smartness and clarity,” he adds, and will be in use from January (in eight possible language variations).

Paris 2024 Olympic logo

The organising committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games has revealed the logo and visual identity for Paris 2024. The logo combines two iconic symbols associated with the Games – a gold medal and the Olympic torch – with an image of Marianne, a female figure representing the French Republic.

The design sees the Paralympic and Olympic Games share a logo for the first time. The organising committee says in a statement that the use of Marianne is both a nod to the sport’s heritage – namely the fact that women athletes were first allowed to compete at the 1900 Olympic Games in Paris – and a homage to female athletes. The committee also says that Marianne represents “the revolutionary spirit” of the Games, and the fact that the Games “belong to the people”.

Forwards is boring

Opting to keep things simple but effective, Desigual hasn’t meddled with its typeface (which was already a simple sans-serif, resembling many of the more recent logo redesigns to surface lately). Instead, the Spanish clothing brand has opted to flip the whole logo altogether. While the ‘S’ in Desigual had already reversed, it has permanently flipped the remaining letters to match, so it now reads entirely in reverse.

The refresh is designed to mirror Desigual’s positioning as a brand that doesn’t follow the norm, from its outlandish clothing lines right down to its name, which literally means ‘different’ in Spanish. The logo redesign was launched as part of the label’s new Forwards Is Boring campaign, headed by Desigual’s in-house creative studio and Amsterdam-based agency We Are Pi. With the campaign also comes a newly redesigned website and a capsule clothing collection showcasing the new logo.

“The objective of the campaign, in addition to presenting the company’s surprising new image which makes it the first international brand to permanently rotate its logo, is to invite people to think. To make them feel awkward. To make them step outside of their comfort zones. Which is exactly what we’ve done,” said Guillem Gallego, Desigual’s CMO.

Though it might not seem like the most original approach, Desigual claims to be the first brand to permanently flip its logo – surprising given how obvious it seems at first glance. Some have responded with weak retorts on how the brand name is pronounced or indeed written in reverse, however it seems likely that these kinds of campaigns will engage consumers, rather than just confuse them. Plus, as such a recognisable name to so many, Desigual can evidently get away with it.