Tag Archives: identity

The new Eames Institute of Curiosity 

Through exhibitions and other programming, as well as a new magazine called Kazam!, it hopes to “equip everyone with the lessons of Ray and Charles Eames, so that anyone can use design to solve problems”, as the Institute explains on its website.

The organisation will be responsible for the Eames Ranch in Petaluma, California, as well as the Eames Collection – which includes furniture, photographs and artworks created by Charles and Ray Eames.

See the brand in action

Manual thoroughly immersed itself in the pair’s work while creating the organisation’s branding. The project was two years in the making, and saw the studio spend time at the Petaluma ranch, delving into the Eames Collection and the personal archive of chief curator Llisa Demetrios – the couple’s granddaughter.

“We set out to approach the project with the same sense of curiosity and inclusivity that Ray and Charles demonstrated in their approach,” Manual writes on its website.

The identity revolves around what Manual describes as “the curious e” – a dramatically curving letter that feels like it embodies all the same mid-century charm as the Eames’ own work. “The monogram has the ability to shift its gaze in order to observe its context, emphasise content, and carry on the Eames’ legacy of spirited discovery,” writes the studio.

Typography was directly inspired by the archive, with the Eames’ use of News Gothic in film titles prompting sans serif Topol Bold, which is paired with the serif Century Schoolbook.

Wolff Olins identity for DailyPay

First revealed last May, the updated identity revolves around the idea that DailyPay is “flipping the system” with regards to acccessing earnings. It’s reflected in a symbol that doubles as a sun peeking behind the horizon and a coin dropping into a slot. The two interpretations are joined together in an animated execution, in which the sun motif flips over to reveal the coin.

The colour palette has been updated from light blue to a sunny orange, and a new custom typeface has also been introduced. The type design, called Horizon, evokes the main symbol through the elongated serifs, exaggerated hooks and the full stop.

DailyPay animated logotype designed by Wolff Olins

Visa new brand identity system

The new system capitalises on Visa’s recognisable colours, and aims to show that it’s “more than just a credit card company” with a new focus on brand purpose.

Based on 200 hours of stakeholder conversations, the agency also developed a new mission statement for Visa that leans into brand purpose: “We believe that economies that include everyone everywhere, uplift everyone everywhere.” This philosophy is tied into the brand symbol, an equals sign, which has been extracted from the recognisable bars that were historically used in the Visa logo lock up prior to 2005. “The symbol has always been there – we just dialed into the opportunity to use it in a creative way,” said Mucho creative director Rob Duncan.

Key to the new branding system was establishing consistency worldwide while helping the existing design elements – such as the Visa wordmark – work harmoniously in digital environments, adjusting colour palettes to work better on digital touchpoints (namely small mobile screens) as part of this.

The agency developed an iconography and illustration system, brought together by the Visa colours (shown below), and worked with Commercial Type on a new typeface, Visa Dialect, which was designed with legibility in digital executions in mind. Mucho also focused on enhancing Visa’s B2B standing with a sleek range of assets using motion design, made with the help of creative studio Field.io.

&Smith creates a “creative, curious, happy” identity

GuestHouse’s identity revolves around a striking wordmark, rendered in a retro-inflected serif with the kind of flourishy ball terminals that suggest that the era of the geometric sans serif is finally winding down.

This forms the umbrella branding for the hospitality group, which plans to create a unique sub-logo and palette for each of its hotel openings. So far, GuestHouse has opened two hotels – one in Bath and one in York. A seafront location in Brighton is set to follow in the new year.

&Smith has applied the branding across some of the business’s more unusual offerings, including cargo bikes that help bring guests’ luggage from the station and in-room papers that offer hyper-local tips.

In an attempt to create a more homely kind of hotel experience, GuestHouse also offers a tipi in every room, on-site dog walkers and help-yourself pantries. The hotel brand plans to draw on local creative and craft talent to make hangers out of “regionally relevant” materials.

Cult’s palate cleansing new identity

Designed by London-based studio Output, Cult’s new identity system nods to the wine sector with clever details, like the letterforms in the new wordmark. The curve of the C reflects the bowl of a wine glass, while the base and stem are contained within the negative space of the letter. The way that curves and cutaways have been applied in the wordmark is carried through subtly to the primary typeface, which has noticeable angular ink traps.

Illustration is central to the new visual language developed for Cult, putting a fresh and fun spin on wine investment, and wine more generally, where traditional luxury tropes might ordinarily be expected.

The team at Output acknowledge that the category is “marred by misconceptions” and that “it can feel complicated and intimidating – even a bit old school”, so they set out to help Cult “revolutionise the category and excite audiences through a new brand proposition, and an inspiring visual and verbal identity”.

Only Studio creates new branding for BIRI

The new logo from Only uses modern serif forms, which were chosen to “balance a feeling of historic permanence and enduring relevance, with the unique forms of the ‘I’s inspired by the Doric order that has influenced so much of the region’s architecture,” says Only co-founder and creative director, Matthew Tweddle.

A new marque was also created, which aims to form a “symbol of collaboration and connectedness”. This is formed from eight points, representative of the eight founding institutes, with a star shape created in the negative space. This references BIRI as a “leading light in arts, humanities and social sciences research,” says Only.



The new branding has helped to unite the leaders of the eight different institutes “behind a shared vision for the future”, according to Only. The studio adds: “Most significantly, the brand has inspired BIRI leadership to launch a joint bid to become a ‘Independent Research Organisation’, a move that if successful will enable the BIRI to compete with universities for research grant funding from the seven major research councils of the United Kingdom. A successful bid to become an ‘IRO’ would help to ensure the future of the Institutes for many years to come.”

Geltor’s identity by &Walsh 

The company has a new visual identity designed by creative agency &Walsh that draws on cells and nature for inspiration. While the existing logo remains, &Walsh fleshed out a new visual language around it, from typeface and colourways to illustration and imagery.

The 3D visuals are crisp without feeling overly clinical, and pop against the royal blue palette. The key assets involve orbs containing a smorgasbord of natural ingredients that inspired Geltor’s proteins. The result is like a Björk video frozen within a snow globe, complete with the surreal art direction we’ve come to expect from &Walsh.

The team also developed an iconography system and a set of line-based illustrations to help distil complex information and make the company feel warmer and more approachable.

New identity for the Alfred Landecker Foundation

The Alfred Landecker Foundation was established in 2016 by the Reimann family after they researched their ancestors’ associations with the National Socialist regime. Unsatisfied by simply uncovering their own past, the family took the lessons they learned and set up the Foundation to promote action and engagement. 

The studio says the site is designed and built around two principles: “the frailty of democracy against the chaos in the world, and a call-to-arms to build a civil response and do better”. Rather than adopt standard webpage names such as ‘About us’ or ‘Projects’, the website’s navigation aims to answer three questions: What we do; Why we exist; and Who we are. “These pages restack as you view them, to reflect how they affect each other and create a more immersive experience,” the studio explains. 

Under those headings are pages on what the Foundation does, such as Strengthen Democracy and Depolarise Debates. These topics again inspire action and are presented almost as a manifesto for the Foundation’s activities. To build a sense of how these topics connect in both confronting and thought-provoking ways, they’re also colour coded.

A mix of typographic faces are used and are occasionally set at unusual angles to heighten this sense of discontentment, plus a series of hover states also shifts content and click-throughs off-balance. The idea is to highlight the structures under threat, which is captured best in the monogram logo itself, through its “contrast of fine hairlines resisting the dominant, and heavy strokes applying pressure”. 

Pinterest new brand identity

The platform is used for finding inspiration, sharing imagery and creating digital mood boards, lending itself to the cut and paste aesthetic that underpins the new look. Led by Made Thought, the new identity aims to put the people who use it – dubbed ‘Pinners’ – front and centre by creating unique scenes reflecting their various interests.

The art direction feels fun and eccentric, thanks to the disparate imagery and use of flexible colour schemes rather than a fixed palette, while the slant of the new sans-serif typeface created by Grilli Type aims to represent “a literal lean into the future”, according to Made Thought.

“We set out to give Pinterest a brand identity as fluid, personal and creative as its own platform — driven by the meandering choices of the user and their ever-evolving dreams of what might be,” says Made Thought creative director Alistair Webb.