Tag Archives: identity

City of culture 2021

The brand identity for Coventry Moves embraces the city’s past, present, and future, and contains icons and shapes inspired by brutalism and modernist architecture

The identity has been designed by Uncommon Creative Studio, and is inspired by brutalist elements and modernist architecture in a nod to the city’s rebuilding after World War II. Based on a modular system of squares and simple shapes, the identity also aims to play on the innovations, movements and stories that have come to characterise the city. The graphic icon in place of the ‘O’ for instance, can be interchanged with various circle-like symbols to represent the industries that have played a role in Coventry’s make-up, such as bicycles, clocks and watches, aircraft and music.

The bright blue that features throughout is tied to Coventry’s medieval past as a centre of the UK’s textile industry. Distilled from the colour of historical yarns, the hue has been named Moving Blue and adds brightness to an otherwise monochrome aesthetic.

LEC lockdown identity

DesignStudio has created the branding for the League of Legends European Championship, which aims to build a sense of community in light of lockdown measures.

While the global pandemic has caused major disruption to the vast majority of sporting events, the world of esports has fared comparatively well. In fact, traditional sports have entered the esports landscape more than ever before, with tournaments like the virtual Grand Prix pitting traditional athletes and gamers against one another for the first time.

Yet the impact on events has still filtered down to the gaming world, with significant tournaments such as the League of Legends European Championship (LEC) having to forgo live crowds and in-person experiences at the finals this summer, and instead rely solely on streaming to audiences online.

With the crowd element removed, DesignStudio is aiming to engage viewers of the LEC Summer Finals 2020 by creating a dynamic identity for the event. The identity and motion graphics tap into the language of social media and online communities with hashtags and arcade-inspired emojis, while the tickertape effect evokes the atmosphere of major arena events. As part of the project, DesignStudio also developed a quiz, as well as a futuristic teaser film that acknowledges no arena could be ‘found’ for the tournament, before culminating in a range of motivational messages about the event.

The team looked to 8-bit graphics and classic arcade games for inspiration, yet the overall look and feel is decidedly contemporary – so much so that certain design elements would look quite at home in club culture.

LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity
LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity

The LEC Summer Finals 2020 branding aims to further this sense of pride and uniqueness in the esports community, in a bid to continue “breaking those entertainment barriers”. That design cues seen in electronic music can exist comfortably in the esports space indicates how preconceptions about the gaming community are being eradicated. “It doesn’t have to be geeky and nerdy and weird. The same people that play those games also attend electronic music festivals,” Ng says. “Why does there need to be a differentiation?”

LEC Summer Finals 2020 identity

Waze’s new identity

Pentagram partner Natasha Jen has rebranded the Google-owned GPS app, introducing a whole of host of cute creatures that mimic the many moods of drivers on the road.

Pentagram partner Natasha Jen was commissioned to create a new visual identity based on Waze’s crowdsourcing roots and collaborative spirit, working in collaboration with the app’s head of creative Jake Shaw.

At the heart of the rebrand is the updated Wazer symbol, which now features a rounder, more upright form to emphasise its speech bubble shape and the app’s focus on communication. The accompanying refreshed logotype is based on Boing, a sans serif typeface with rounded corners designed to give a friendlier look.

Jen’s team also developed a new visual language for the app called Block by Block, which is inspired by the modular design of city grids and road systems. The geometric grid ensures consistency across everything from infographics to email templates, featuring a flexible array of colourful block-like shapes.

Illustration has always been a big part of Waze’s visual identity. The new branding brings greater clarity to this style, with Jen and her team redrawing existing icons and establishing a style guide for new illustrations going forward.

TGI Friday’s new identity

The first ever TGI Fridays opened on the corner of New York’s 63rd and 1st in 1965. It was swiftly popularised not as the casual-dining family restaurant that it is today, but as a singles bar for cocktail-swilling young adults in Manhattan; one of the first of its kind and apparently the inspiration for Tom Cruise’s bartender character in the film Cocktail.

More recently, and much like the rest of the food scene on the high street, the restaurant chain has struggled to stand out against the raft of independent burger joints and street food venues that dominate our cities.

Working with the company’s new leadership team, SomeOne has been rethinking the TGI Fridays brand over the past six months, stripping it back down to a tagline that captures the essence of its New York origins: The Fridays Feeling.

“Our vision is to make Fridays famous again so we needed to breathe fresh life into the brand by relevantly leveraging the past,” says the chain’s CEO, Robert B Cook. “The Fridays Feeling is the inspiration for our new food and drink menus and a service plan designed to consistently deliver the best guest experiences and a generosity of spirit.”

SomeOne started by reducing the brand name down to just Fridays, based on the fact that the meaning of TGI had become lost and confused over time.

Another design feature from the restaurant’s roots is the use of bold vertical red and white stripes, which nod to the original awnings of the 1965 bar, and also take inspiration from historic circus company Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey.

Cadbury rebrand

In its newly unveiled brand identity, the company attempts to tread the fine line between heritage and modernity, retaining its signature purple hue but introducing a redrawn wordmark, new iconography and a fresh approach to typography.

Created by design agency Bulletproof, the refreshed Cadbury wordmark is a contemporary take on the signature of the company’s founder, John Cadbury.

Meanwhile, the agency reimagined the Dairy Milk Glass and a Half logo so that it links directly with the brand’s chocolate chunk symbol, and developed a new pattern for the chocolate based on its original packaging from 1905.Nick Rees, global creative director at Bulletproof, says: “We wanted to recapture the very spirit of Cadbury, so part of the research process involved digging into the Cadbury archives to reinterpret its iconic visual cues to create a modern and playful identity that still has a clear recognition for consumers.”The new brand identity was kicking off in Australia in May, followed by South Africa and Malaysia later in the year, and will be rolled out to other markets including the UK and Ireland at the beginning of 2021.

Pier 70 new identity

dn&co delved into Pier 70’s industrial past to create the new identity, which references the 50-foot steel frame that’s been turned into a new gateway for the area. The architecture also informs a series of linear patterns that cut through posters and adverts. According to the studio, the tagline, Made of San Francisco, is an effort to root the area in the heart of the community, after dn&co interviewed locals and found that many feel the city is losing its soul.

Brand colours reference the story of the pier as well as its surroundings, using bright orange, blue and pink alongside greys and browns that nod to Pier 70’s history. It takes Druk as its display typeface, using its solid letterforms as another reference to the area’s industrial heritage.

Liberty new identity

Founded in 1934 in response to police attempts to stop peaceful protests during the Hunger Marches. While Liberty’s values have remained the same throughout its history, its branding had become dated over the years, and the organisation brought in design studio North to reimagine its visual identity for today’s landscape.

The double L and I character in the new logotype is intended to be a “rallying cry” to its membership base, says North, adding: “Our civil rights are dependent on the effort of individuals, and so challenge us to be responsible. The special L and I character expresses the dichotomy between the organisation and the individual.”

Bureau Grot was chosen as the main font family for its “bold” appearance and “approachable quality”, says North, while the core colour palette eschews politically charged colours such as red and blue for green, and was inspired by the coloured hankerchiefs of the Argentinian women’s rights and pro-choice movement Pañuelazo.liberty's new logo represents ordinary people standing up to power, designed by north

The studio also worked on a brand campagin to go with the visual identity, which uses the logotype to highlight some of the key cases Liberty has worked on over the years, which have ranged from fighting fascism to exposing the dark side of mass surveillance.

liberty's new logo represents ordinary people standing up to power, designed by north designboom

&Walsh identity for SuperShe

Jessica Walsh and her team created a colourful visual identity for the women’s community app, eschewing the singular ‘girl boss’ stereotype often associated with feminist brands.

&Walsh, Jessica Walsh’s recently formed agency, was commissioned to work on the branding, strategy and merch for SuperShe. It’s a fitting project for the designer given that &Walsh is one of the 0.1% of design agencies founded, owned and run solely by women.

“When looking at other women’s communities, we realised that many of them were overly prescribing the way women in that community ‘should be’. Be a girl boss, travel the world and wear your nightly face masks.

The agency developed a custom brush font which aims to be “loud and confident” but also “friendly and fun”, according to Walsh, and is paired with secondary fonts Panamera and Bureau Grot.

Identity in a week

Oak National AcademyIn the space of a week, Johnson Banks delivered the branding for the new educational platform, which uses an acorn as a metaphor for how learning works.

Teaching has taken a surprising turn amid the coronavirus pandemic. Juggling kids, work and home-schooling is a new reality for many families around the country, while teachers are having to adapt lesson plans and structures to keep children educated remotely.

In response to these new circumstances, a group of teachers and educators formed Oak National Academy, a free ‘online classroom’ and resource bank designed to support teachers and help create lesson plans. Given the pressing nature of the situation, Oak National Academy needed a quick turnaround – a week, in fact – and enlisted design studio Johnson Banks to get the brand up and running.Johnson Banks pulled together a team of designers, coders, animators, writers and illustrators, who collaborated across the brand identity, helpful icons, lesson plan templates, and the website at the heart of it all. The brand logo – a floating acorn – draws on oak iconography, which is subtly reinforced by woody tones of rich green and dark violet used across the plaform.Oak National AcademyOak National Academy

The website design is clean and simplistic, allowing the team to fully realise the project in such a short amount of time. However, the visual design of the platform also makes it straightforward and unintimidating for the vast number of users already recorded – 23,000 lessons were started on the day of the launch, and the website attracted over 200,000 unique visitors within its first few hours.

“We’ve done small identity projects fast before – but creating a nationwide brand across multiple channels, in a week? Very, very testing,” says Michael Johnson, creative director at Johnson Banks. “But very rewarding to do something which is already proving so useful to thousands of teachers, parents and families.”