Tag Archives: handlettering

Vasava uses hand-drawn type to reimagine children’s classics

Barcelona-based agency Vasava takes a trip down memory lane by reimagining classic children’s book covers in a bid to encourage a new generation of readers.

Some of the titles Vasava has renewed, such as Treasure Island and Around the World in 80 Days, are books less popular with kids today, so the agency adopted an eye-catching concept. “We incorporated illustrations into the lettering, creating vignettes, which would act as a visual synopsis for each novel,” says the studio. “The comic book style was paired with bright colour palettes to create a happy and inviting collection of books that any kid would proudly display on their bookshelf.”

Cover for Alice in Wonderland

Each title has its own lettering which hints towards the story within, such as Peter Pan’s flowing type that makes the reader think of pirate flags and Wendy’s old-fashioned nighty. To really bring the covers to life though, Vasava took a detailed approach when deciding what the illustrations should contain and they started by highlighting the key characters, locations and objects from each of the novels. 

Cover for Peter Pan

The collection of covers pop with vibrant, clashing colours and are crammed with intricate illustrations. What ties the whole series together is the vintage treatment of each title, reinforcing the idea of the books as literary classics.

Cover for Jungle Book
Cover for The Wizard of Oz

Bottles Are OUT & Bars Are In

Hero_Hair_1.jpg“Bars not bottles” is the tagline for Holland & Barrett’s new plastic-free beauty range that is selling out at astonishing rates. 

Ethique, a line of vegan and and cruelty-free soaps—which run the gamut from body bars, hair bars, face bars, and sustainable storage solutions—marks a first for Holland & Barrett, although with the July 7th launch marking a 300% increase in search results, and over 13,000 brand page visits, the sign from consumers is clear; sustainable beauty brands are in.Ethique Pinkalicious shampoo bar review.jpg

The bars come in paper boxes adorned with a playful, hand-lettered style script in vibrant jewel-tones that reflect the main ingredients and scents. They’re also ideal for those looking for cruelty-free products with a price-conscious budget, given that the soaps range from  £5.49 to £26.99. 

“By creating solid bars of beauty products without the water that makes up to 90% of a traditional liquid product, we hope to help combat the plastic pollution problem by providing consumers with a zero-waste alternative,” said founder Brianne West in Mirror. “After all, there’s water in your shower—why would you need more in your shampoo?”damage.jpg

Oat-ly milk?

While oat milk’s popularity is just gaining momentum in the US, it got its start in Sweden back in the early 1990s. Rickard Öste, a food scientist at Lund University, researched options for a milk replacement that could provide a more sustainable solution and also be suitable for those with lactose intolerance. Essentially, he discovered a way to make the fibers of oats into a liquid, and shortly afterward he founded Oatly.

So why didn’t oat milk get added to cafe menus back in the 90s when it first became available? 

“Design-wise, it was sort of in the lactose intolerance category, so it wasn’t really considered food for everyone,” explained Lars Elfman, Design Director at Oatly. So when Toni Petersson was appointed CEO of Oatly in 2012—nearly two decades after the invention of oat milk—the first thing he did was hire one of the Creative Directors to turn the brand around.5268.jpgoatly-ice-cream-today-main-190620_3d1fb261dbf0c58d525e883825538d3f.jpgOatly-range-with-chilled-milk.jpg

The team certainly had their work cut out for them, after all, when they started they were an ad agency, not a design company. “I hadn’t made food packaging before,” confessed Lars. Still, they looked at the challenge as an opportunity to do something different—so different, in fact, that when they first approached Tetra Pak about printing the design they’d created, the packaging company initially said no. “They looked at it and were like, ‘You’re not going to be happy.’ They were worried about smearing and about some of the large dots becoming too big. So we bought a big roll of paper to have them do a test print first.”

The result? It came out perfectly. Lars said they’d done something no one else had done before, and that Tetra Pak had worked wonders with their packaging—although it was a good learning process for Oatly overall.

In going against the expectations of what food packaging should be (as well as what other brands gravitate towards), Lars and the team instead positioned Oatly as a handmade product. The brand’s packaging has a screen printed appearance with a more “scruffy background,” as he described it, making it feel like a custom crafted beverage and just another milk alternative.Slide-2-hello-future.8_2048x.png


Camille Walala

Camille Walala is a purveyor of powerfully positive digital print. A graduate in Textile Design from the University of Brighton, her namesake brand was established in East London in 2009, where she continues to live.

Recent work has seen her progressing from her popular textile based range to include Art Direction, Interior Design and a continued love affair with popup restaurants, where her love for food and design are brought to life.

Influences include the Memphis Movement, the Ndebele tribe and Optical Art master Vasarely alongside the simple desire to put a smile on people’s faces.

Her signature Tribal POP style present a boundless energy that work perfectly for show-stopping and social spaces – “the bigger the better”.

Clients include: Nintendo, XOYO, Koppaberg, Bompas&Parr, Darkroom, Barbican Festival and Land of King.WALALA ROOF TOP NEW YORK September 2014POP UP BAR ROMANCE WAS BORN SYDNEY June 2012GEORGINA’S HAPPY HOUSE London, September 2013More work