Tag Archives: dieline

Panettoni Pavolucci’s Packaging Feels Like A Warm Embrace

Requena and Martí Pujol worked together for Panettoni Pavolucci to embrace color through the gorgeous use of warm hues. When paired with the elegant, oversized typeface, the packaging for the bakery’s goods feels like a luxurious hug that’s welcome to all.

SINNEK’s Bold Packaging System Visualizes The Bodywork Paint Brand’s Pillars

Sinnek is a car paint brand that promises its consumers quality, efficiency, technology, and color. The brand worked with Diego Bellorin to create a packaging system that visually translates these promises. The bold yellow hue and bold typography system create a packaging system that’s authoritative and professional while also showcasing the brand’s high-performance personality.

BAZ & CO’s Basil-Based Skincare Products

The beauty industry is a crowded space. From organic products and vegan brands to “clean” lines, there’s not only a somewhat hazy description for just about everything, but a product for everyone. Yet, while some brands claim to be clean or organic,BAZ & CO  is a natural skincare line created by a farmer who knows a thing or two about raw ingredients. 

The strategy, branding, packaging, digital design, and digital development were designed by London-based agency Otherway. BAZ & CO gets named after its principal ingredient, basil, a plant known for its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. The green primary packaging hue reflects the herb’s prominence within the products. In addition, the sustainable, fully recyclable packaging is made of aluminum and glass, shedding light on the importance of sustainability, especially for nature’s sake.

Because the beauty industry is so overcrowded, Otherway wanted to ensure that BAZ & CO’s packaging and branding systems were distinct enough to stand out. Using recyclable materials and inks guarantees this, and the innovative and styled typography and design styles further highlight the brand’s sustainable intentions.  

The minimalistic design was strategic, yet it also leaves room for the brand’s inevitable growth. The system’s flexibility comes from the minimalistic aesthetic deployed by the agency, allowing new products to seamlessly become part of the line and adapt the green packaging with white typography and instruction manual-inspired illustrations. 

So, sure, farm-to-table meals have been around for a while, but farm-to-face skincare products are the latest and greatest addition to the skincare industry. 

Pepsi Says It Goes Better With Food, Creates Tasty Comic Book-Inspired Cans

Pepsi’s current promotional campaign, “Better with Pepsi,” highlights how its signature cola pairs great with some of our favorite foods like doughnuts and pizza. Some of Pepsi’s latest collabs have involved snacks and cola mashups, like maple-drenched IHOP pancakes and Cracker Jack popcorn.

The latest from PepsiCo’s design teams in Shanghai and Bangkok celebrates the connection between Pepsi and mealtime with playful artwork featuring some favorite snacks across the Asian Pacific market. Pepsi’s goal is to appeal to Gen Z consumers by highlighting how we are our authentic selves at home. 

Sustainable at the forefront of Dr Teal’s rebrand

To create a sustainable packaging design for Dr. Teals, student designer Hanson Ma designed the conceptual design with customization at the forefront of the design. This gets consumers excited about their purchase, but it makes them mindful of taking sustainable steps when purchasing elsewhere. The result is a packaging system that’s colorful, eclectic, and eco-friendly, something more brands, especially beauty companies, should be conscious about evolving into their own brands.

The reimagined Dr. Teal’s is an online personal care product line that is fully customizable and is individually formulated. These products are made specifically for the user. It matches specific skin and hair types, skin conditions, preferences in ingredients, and personal goals. Customers can customize the packaging with a selection of recycled plastic materials, ceramics, as well as different paints of aluminum. Labels are also personalized with the ingredient selections and color-coded with the ingredient selection.

The primary labels are bellybands. The color of the ingredient selection is shown on the inside when you take it off. The logo is embossed on the front side with a blind emboss on the back side.

Skincare Yepoda focuses on clean rebrand

Kepoda’s skincare packaging, designed by OWLSOME STUDIO, introduces consumers to the ingredients inspired by accessible skincare. The packaging is simple, focusing on a clean and sophisticated design, highlighting a vertical logo that brings the user’s eye from top to bottom. Additionally, the color palette across the line is refreshing yet playful.

Over Easy

Over Easy is launching into the breakfast category with a line of simple, nutritious, and better-for-you breakfast bars in four morning-inspired flavors – Apple Cinnamon, Banana Nut, Peanut Butter, and Vanilla Matcha – with a bold, colorful look and message to match.

Viva water feel more like a treat

Viva Mineral Water’s packaging represents the distinct past of the resource of the beverage. Each bottle showcases the “four elements of nature” through a beautifully etched pattern on the glass bottle. Created by Prompt Design, the water’s packaging is sleek and refined, adding an element of surprise to a drink we know is vital to our lives.

Our design intention is to present the distinctiveness of mineral water resource through the “four elements of nature” concept by depicting the symbolic expression the “four elements of nature” as different patterns on the bottle surface. The embossing helps enhance the attractiveness and water purity reflection of the bottle as well as its luxury, high class and uniqueness in design.

Everyone loves Chocolate

Chocolate is a truly miraculous thing. The indulgent treat made from cocoa pods becomes a delicious food when mixed with other ingredients, such as sugar, fruit, or nuts. Unfortunately, most chocolate bars are made with refined sugars and stick to conventional ingredients.

Spring & Mulberry is a chocolate brand founded by Kathryn Shah and Sarah Bell to share more complex flavors beyond sweet, adding organic fruit, pollens, nuts, and spices, all sweetened with dates, a purportedly healthier alternative to refined sugars. Spring & Mulberry also uses organic ingredients whenever possible, and the bars are vegan save for lavender, bee pollen, and rose petal since it contains animal-derived pollen.

“The brief was to take the client’s product— date-sweetened chocolate—and build a brand supporting the concept of ‘exploring a world of sweet beyond sugar,’” said Allison Henry Aver, owner and creative director at Letter A, the agency behind Spring & Mulberry’s packaging. “We created the ‘land of Spring & Mulberry,’ where food and friends and feasts are abundant, good looking, and good-for-you. The land is showered in dappled light and dreamy sunsets, and from this, we took inspiration for our color palette, packaging, prints, and photography.”

The design is elegant, with fanciful and striking typography. The logo also makes tasteful use of Meek Display, with Brick DisplayClifton, and Nexus playing supporting roles. The mix of varying widths, round, and sharp edges shows complexity and craftwork, signaling a premium experience and product.

Baskin-Robbins

Baskin-Robbins has had a bit of an identity crisis the last few years. They’re still all about the ice cream they scoop up, ice cream cakes, sundaes, and shakes, but Baskin Robbins’ logo and branding haven’t delighted as much as its sweet, frozen treats. At the end of 2020, Baskin-Robbins introduced a new visual identity, replacing its maligned logo with a JKR-designed look, a definite step forward and inspired by “Living Flavorfully.”

Now, Baskin-Robbins has unveiled another logo and visual identity system, this time by creative agency ChangeUp (though, according to Baskin-Robbins, it hasn’t undergone a “major” brand refresh in decades). Time flies, supposedly, and recent events have likely distorted our perception of its passing, but the early 2021 refresh also included a new logo, visual system, and bespoke typeface.

“Baskin-Robbins is one of those brands with the unique potential to transcend generations. They wanted the branding to deliver the quality and creativity they’ve always offered but weren’t getting credit for,” explained Ryan Brazelton, ChangeUp CCO. “They needed to create a visual identity system that was exciting for people who grew up with them and future audiences as well.”

The new Baskin-Robbins logo turns to the brand’s visual history as inspiration for the new design. The brown and pink color combination is back, which sounds as gross as chocolate orange mayonnaise, but it works. The new logo keeps the oh-so-clever “31,” first introduced in 2006’s logo ( and held over in 2021). The type has a bit of the original’s circus feel, and the perfect circle shapes also recall the logo first introduced in 1947. Secondary typography is much more subdued in this refresh. Gone are the sharp angles, and the new type is less child-like and more mature, adding some soft lines that keep the new visual presentation casual and comfortable.