Tag Archives: dieline

Eco at heart packaging inspired by the Ocean

“Eco at Heart create beautifully designed reusable and environmentally-friendly products. A trip to Bali left brand founders Stu and Davina feeling shocked at the amount of plastic-covered beaches they encountered. They later learnt that Indonesia is the second-largest (after China) contributor of pollutants in the ocean and it was evident that single-use plastics, particularly straws – were the most problematic items.

With the ocean providing the main visual inspiration behind the brand, we took references from the coastline to develop the identity system. I created a series of watermark patterns to convey the organic essence of the business and convey a feeling of calm with soft shapes and natural textures.”

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Guilt-free chocolate?

Guilt-free chocolate just took on a whole new meaning thanks to Nestlé’ Japan replacing the plastic packaging on their miniature Kit Kat bars. 

Back in January, the beloved candy company announced that it would only use reusable and 100% recyclable packaging by 2025 and it looks like they’re beginning to make good on that promise. 

If you purchase the original, matcha and dark chocolate flavors of Kit-Kat miniatures, you will find the usual plastic wrapper replaced with origami paper. Kit-Kat is a hot commodity in Japan, with over 4 million units sold each day. The company includes instructions on how to take the paper and turn it into a crane, in a move that makes packaging sustainable and interactive. The shift in the material is said to decrease the company’s plastic use by 380 tons per year.

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Bella Vida

After years of struggling with cystic acne, founder and CEO Erin Schmidt of luxury skincare line Bella Vida Santa Barbara decided to craft a line of products like cleansers and serums that could naturally help acne sufferers. Bella Vida means “Beautiful Life,” and on the company’s website, they tout that their passion is to help everyone feel beautiful and love themselves, a lofty goal that the cosmetic industry often ironically misses.

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The font-focused logo for Bella Vida Santa Barbara went through three rounds of designs in-house by Schmidt, who was inspired by luxury designers Chanel, Gucci, Yves St. Laurent and Christian Dior. Schmidt tried several fonts she had on hand and went to a group of fellow entrepreneurs for feedback.Editorial photographEditorial photograph

New Skincare Line

To launch a skincare line in today’s oversaturated beauty market, you need to be confident that your target demographic will be on board. With the launch of Plenaire, a new UK-based brand, they’ve gone to the source, working closely with a Gen-Z focus-group that likely helped shaped HBO’s Euphoria as well?Editorial photographThe packaging for the line they developed with the help of design firm Pentagram skews minimal, with the tubes light, pastel-pink and signature lilac (named ‘Cresyl’ after the purple histological stain cresyl violet) with small particles to add a layer of texture. Minimalist, yet striking enough to work into your “shelfies,” the design of Plenaire comes elevated without being overly flashy. Their online presence is also minimalist and inclusive, as any brand speaking to Gen Z should be. Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Kebun packageing

Beniamin Pop Brand Architect created the typographically-driven packaging for Kebun, a Romanian restaurant that serves kebab.

“Kebun is a packaging made for Condimental, an award winning Quick Service Restaurant (QSR) chain from Bucharest, Romania. Condimental’s purpose is to reposition the kebab product in the consumer’s mind. How would they succeed? By creating THE NEW KEBAB – a fresh kebab in a box with special ingredients (pomegranate, aubergine, homemade sauces) and no flat bread. ”Editorial photographEditorial photograph“The name Kebun is a combined word from ‘kebab’ and ‘bun’ – which means ‘great, fine, pleasing’ in Romanian. The name has a very agreeable tune and its purpose was to underline a difference in regard to the regular kebabs found elsewhere along with the product’s high quality and healthy approach. While the competition is selling kebabs, Condimental is selling kebuns.”Editorial photograph

Zigulì

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“Zigulì was born in 1969 and has deep roots in memory of each Italian children. The candy has always been sold in Pharmacy because of its naturality and richness of vitamins important for health. This year Zigulì celebrates his 50th anniversary. The candy goodness has remained unchanged but the pack has become obsolete.????”

“The importance of fruit is represented with a colorful pattern that covers the entire packaging. The rigor and thoroughness of the pharmaceutical information are ordered in the table. Everything in a vintage feeling.”

Bottles Are OUT & Bars Are In

Hero_Hair_1.jpg“Bars not bottles” is the tagline for Holland & Barrett’s new plastic-free beauty range that is selling out at astonishing rates. 

Ethique, a line of vegan and and cruelty-free soaps—which run the gamut from body bars, hair bars, face bars, and sustainable storage solutions—marks a first for Holland & Barrett, although with the July 7th launch marking a 300% increase in search results, and over 13,000 brand page visits, the sign from consumers is clear; sustainable beauty brands are in.Ethique Pinkalicious shampoo bar review.jpg

The bars come in paper boxes adorned with a playful, hand-lettered style script in vibrant jewel-tones that reflect the main ingredients and scents. They’re also ideal for those looking for cruelty-free products with a price-conscious budget, given that the soaps range from  £5.49 to £26.99. 

“By creating solid bars of beauty products without the water that makes up to 90% of a traditional liquid product, we hope to help combat the plastic pollution problem by providing consumers with a zero-waste alternative,” said founder Brianne West in Mirror. “After all, there’s water in your shower—why would you need more in your shampoo?”damage.jpg

Oat-ly milk?

While oat milk’s popularity is just gaining momentum in the US, it got its start in Sweden back in the early 1990s. Rickard Öste, a food scientist at Lund University, researched options for a milk replacement that could provide a more sustainable solution and also be suitable for those with lactose intolerance. Essentially, he discovered a way to make the fibers of oats into a liquid, and shortly afterward he founded Oatly.

So why didn’t oat milk get added to cafe menus back in the 90s when it first became available? 

“Design-wise, it was sort of in the lactose intolerance category, so it wasn’t really considered food for everyone,” explained Lars Elfman, Design Director at Oatly. So when Toni Petersson was appointed CEO of Oatly in 2012—nearly two decades after the invention of oat milk—the first thing he did was hire one of the Creative Directors to turn the brand around.5268.jpgoatly-ice-cream-today-main-190620_3d1fb261dbf0c58d525e883825538d3f.jpgOatly-range-with-chilled-milk.jpg

The team certainly had their work cut out for them, after all, when they started they were an ad agency, not a design company. “I hadn’t made food packaging before,” confessed Lars. Still, they looked at the challenge as an opportunity to do something different—so different, in fact, that when they first approached Tetra Pak about printing the design they’d created, the packaging company initially said no. “They looked at it and were like, ‘You’re not going to be happy.’ They were worried about smearing and about some of the large dots becoming too big. So we bought a big roll of paper to have them do a test print first.”

The result? It came out perfectly. Lars said they’d done something no one else had done before, and that Tetra Pak had worked wonders with their packaging—although it was a good learning process for Oatly overall.

In going against the expectations of what food packaging should be (as well as what other brands gravitate towards), Lars and the team instead positioned Oatly as a handmade product. The brand’s packaging has a screen printed appearance with a more “scruffy background,” as he described it, making it feel like a custom crafted beverage and just another milk alternative.Slide-2-hello-future.8_2048x.png


Hagi Baby packages

6e40b565117679.5ae971e379ecc.jpg“Packaging for Hagi Baby—natural handmade cosmetics for babies. The project includes the packaging design for a series of creams. Hagi Cosmetics is a brand driven by respect and a love of nature. The products are manufactured on a small scale, with no additives and a clean process. The design combines drawings of animals with simple, minimalist typography. Overall, the visual language tells the story of natural and safe products for children in a modern, clean language.”e9035465117679.5af2e3e98bb03.gifDesigned By: Podpunkt