Tag Archives: Campaign

Child food poverty campaign

No child should have to go to bed hungry, but the UK’s latest statistics on child food poverty highlight a systemic problem that urgently needs tackling. Pre-Covid, 30% of all children across the country were living in poverty, while food insecurity in families with children has increased dramatically in lockdown.

Launched in response to the government’s new Healthy Start voucher, Rashford has joined forces with Michelin-starred chef Tom Kerridge on a new national campaign, Full Time: Get Cooking with Marcus & Tom.

The campaign, which aims to equip children with vital life skills to support their navigation into adult life, is supported by Facebook and Instagram and aims to eliminate stigma around the use of Healthy Start vouchers.

Kerridge has created 52 simple, family-friendly recipes as part of the 12-month-long programme, which encourages parents and carers to enjoy one hour of valuable time each week cooking with their children, and puts emphasis on recipes that use limited equipment and longer shelf life goods.

Recipes will be available to pick up in various forms from selected supermarkets every Sunday morning. Each recipe will feature a QR code linking through to the Full Time Instagram page, where users can access short-form tutorial videos hosted by Tom, Marcus and a selection of celebrity guests.

London-based design studio The Clearing was brought in to lead on the branding for Full Time, with a brief to develop the campaign’s visual identity, name and strategy.

The result is a colourful take on home cooking, which swaps off-putting, health-focused language for more casual phrases such as ‘Get stuck in’ and ‘It’s time to fill up’.

New campaign on Gen Z & tech

A new campaign by Saatchi & Saatchi is sticking up for the young people who get flak for being glued to their screens. Directed by Vincent Haycock, the film at the centre of the #WhatWeDoNext campaign offers an uplifting and compelling counter-argument to the theory that young people are out of touch due to social media and other tech. Instead, it illustrates the many ways young people are instigating positive change, oftentimes using technology to get the word out.

“We wanted to capture the spirit of this generation and show their collective voice harnessed by their use of social media. They are a generation that uses technology and social media to raise awareness and create communities,” Director Vincent Haycock said of the film. “We set out to make a film that felt honest to each of the characters’ world. Most of what you see is either their actual world or inspired very closely by who they are or what they represent. Billie’s is the voice of this generation, her music and words are very important to Gen Z. Having her narrate the film couldn’t have been a better choice.”

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi
Global CCO: Kate Stanners
CCO: Guillermo Vega
ECDS: Franki Goodwin, William John
Creatives: Mia Silverman, Francesco Grandi
Production company: Somesuch
Director: Vincent Haycock

Anthony Burrill shows support for Extinction Rebellion

The designer has created a series of posters and graphics to support XR’s protests in central London, also joining supporters at a live printing workshop in Trafalgar Square.

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Designer Anthony Burrill has created a series of graphics and slogans to support this week’s action. He has also joined in with the protests, taking part in a live print workshop at Trafalgar Square on Wednesday.

His designs aim to encourage others to think about their own carbon footprint and the steps they can take to reduce their impact on the environment. “I was thinking about change and those small changes we can make to our lives that have a bigger effect when we all do them,” he explains.

With his use of bold type and bright colours, Burrill’s aesthetic feels like a natural fit with Extinction Rebellion’s visual identity. The group has become known for its striking graphics, posters and props, which draw inspiration from protest movements of the 50s and 60s.

Never Forget

Photographer Tom Cockram shines a spotlight on the survivors and the bereaved in new exhibition with Grenfell United

Over two years have passed since the Grenfell Tower tragedy took place, but the fight for justice continues. Many are still displaced, liable bodies are still evading consequences, and health and safety standards are still being carelessly flouted across the country. A recent government report shows that there remain 338 buildings wrapped in the same kind of cladding as that found at Grenfell Tower.

Cockram has been working on the project over the past year, photographing intimate, monochrome portraits of those most closely affected by the tragedy and the subsequent fallout. Alongside the exhibition, there will also be a handful of talks and events, including photography workshops for the Grenfell community and a screening of revelatory film Failed By The State, which features members of the local area detailing their experience of gentrification and the role the authorities play.

The exhibition, Never Forget Grenfell, is a collaborative effort between Cockram and Grenfell United, a group of survivors and bereaved families from the Grenfell Tower. The group’s Vice-Chair, Karim Mussilhy, said: “Grenfell was filled with amazing people, a true community with people from all walks of life who looked out for each other. Since the fire that community has grown stronger as bereaved, survivors and neighbours near and far have come together to support each other. We hope this exhibition will show Londoners that our community is strong, dignified and united.”

Mothercare campaign

A mother holding a newborn baby is one of the oldest and most enduring subjects in art, a staple of religious iconography and a classic dramatic trope.

But – from the Renaissance through to the glossy magazines of now – the physical effects of childbirth on a woman’s body have always been an aspect of motherhood hidden from public view. 

Even in our more open times, frank discussions about the sometimes brutal impact of birth are rare, and instead are still largely dealt with in private, with the media actively celebrating those women who bounce back quickly to their pre-birth figures.

Now, a new advertising campaign from Mothercare that is being trialled across 30 tube stations on the London Underground is bringing a more honest depiction of new motherhood into the spotlight.

Mothercare said in a statement: “Body Proud Mums boldly seeks to normalise mothers’ experiences, spark a positive conversation and help mums feel confident and proud of their bodies. At the heart of the campaign is the belief that all mums are beautiful. After all, their bodies have just performed a miracle.”

Shot by British photographer Sophie Mayanne, the campaign comprises of ten celebratory portraits of women who have very recently become mothers. They’re shown holding their babies close and smiling as the kids laugh, gawp at the camera in bemusement, or, in some cases, scream their heads off.

The photographs have apparently been published without digital retouching, and the effects of birth are evident, yet the scars and stretch marks are not the focus of the portraits. But, equally, they’re not hidden. Each portrait is accompanied with the simple phrase: ‘Beautiful, isn’t she.’