Tag Archives: brand

Mere restaurant brand

Bibliothèque has designed the identity and communications material for Mere, the new London restaurant from Monica and David Galetti. The name and logo of the restaurant link directly to Monica and her family: the establishment is named after her mother Mere (pronounced ‘Mary in Samoan’), while also the French for ‘mother’. The ‘M’ logotype is apparently inspired by part of a Samoan tattoo as worn by the chef.

The identity uses a bespoke cut of the typeface Ratio by Clement Rouzaud. “Monica is a details person and our working relationship has been a close one to ensure that her exacting standards are met,” says Bibliothèque’s Tim Beard.

Bibliothèque worked with Imprimerie du Marais in Paris on the design of three ‘Food’, ‘Bar’ and ‘Wine’ menus and receipt folders. Each menu uses a combination of three inlaid materials, inspired by the restaurant’s interior design by Monica and architecture/design practice Softroom.

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New V festival identity

The Virgin V Festival has unveiled a brand new look for its 22nd incarnation this coming August created by studio Form. The redesigned logo and identity have just been rolled out in advance of the festival and will form part of the onsite design of the event.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The project has also resulted in series of additional graphic motifs – from various shapes and arrows to background patterns – which can be used in announcements in print and on social media in the lead up to V Festival 2017.

Studio Prak’s visual identity for Dance House Helsinki

Dance House Helsinki symbolTanssin Talo which translates to Dance House, is an ambitious €35 million project which will see the construction of a dance training and performance space in Helsinki. Development of the project began last year, and the venue is due to open in 2020. The space hopes to make dance a central part of Helsinki’s cultural offering. Studio Prakt were tasked with designing the identity for Tansin Talo; they’ve created a building-block inspired monogram which became the starting point for a visual language which will be adapted across promotional material, merchandise and more. The branding is distinct, yet subtle and versatile.

Visuals for dance house helsinki

Mozilla rebrand

Internet advocacy and software group Mozilla has revealed its new logo and brand assets – including a bespoke typeface, colour palette and proposed approach to imagery – following a seven-month “open design” process documented on its blog

The new Mozilla logo and suggest colourwaysToday – after seven months, thousands of emails, hundreds of meetings and three rounds of research – the company has finally revealed its new logo, along with a proposed colour palette, language architecture and approach to imagery. Mozilla is now inviting feedback on the branding and says it will continue to share updates as final guidelines are developed.

Peter Bil’ak of Dutch type foundry Typotheque has created a bespoke font, Zilla, for the wordmark and accompanying copy. The font is reminiscent of Courier – the default font used for coding – and was selected for its “journalistic feel”, reflecting Mozilla’s internet advocacy work. It is open-source and will be available to download for free.

Mozilla creative director Tim Murray says the company chose to work with Typotheque because of the foundry’s expertise in “localisation” and creating fonts in various languages. As Murray points out, the design bucks the current trend for sans serif fonts in favour of something rooted in the visual language of the internet.

Names and phrases will appear underneath or to the right of the logoSuggested imagery for Mozilla communicationsjohnsonbanks_Mozilla-1500px_apps2The company intends to work with artists, coders and developers to create a constantly evolving bank of imagery

Kinnersley Kent rebrand Athenaeum hotel in Mayfair

Kinnersley Kent designed around 80 items for the hotel, from menus and coasters to luggage tags, door key-cards and umbrellas. The ‘A’ brand marque is inspired by the art deco era and the building’s architecture – “specifically, by the hard lines of the building combined with the softness of the hotel’s famous external planting,” says director of graphics Kenny Sum. The agency also created postcards for the hotel bar’s signature cocktails and invitation cards for the General Manager to use when inviting guests for a drink. Cards feature a rose gold A and an image of a man in a suit.

Typefaces Romain and Brown were chosen for their mix of “heritage and modernity” and a herringbone pattern is inspired by oak floors in the building’s lobby. Gold foil detailing and deep colours add a touch of luxury – the colour palette includes deep blue, purple and green alongside mustard, bright orange and lighter neutral shades. Colours are used to signify different spaces in the hotel: blue represents lobby activities such as checking in, purple is used for the restaurant and green for the bar.

Copywriting aims to reflect a “tongue-in-cheek British sense of humour”. A welcome mat for guests leaving the building reads Toodle Pip while breakfast order cards feature the phrase ‘Rise and Shine’.

This rebrand reminds me for my Design Museum brand

History Channel Makeover

Branding agency DixonBaxi has created a new visual identity for cable TV channel History, which aims to challenge perceptions of history as dry, dull or academic.

lab_spoken_wordThe channel launched a new visual identity created by DixonBaxi, the London branding agency behind the on-air identities for Eurosport and the Premier League. The identity is based on a strong use of type, close-cropped imagery and copywriting that combines witty lines and dramatic statements.

DixonBaxi was initially asked to devise a brand strategy for the channel but ended up designing a comprehensive on and off-air identity system. “We essentially became an extension of the A+E Networks team for an intense six months,” says DixonBaxi co-founder and ECD Aporva Baxi. “We did a number of strategic and creative sprints here at our studio with their team flying in for a few days. And then we spent time at the New York offices for presentations, workshops and to share the work with the wider teams.” 

Rebrand

“The logo is pretty much what you’d expect the logo for a history channel to be … but we thought, if we can pair it with a more modern scheme, it could become a powerful anchor,” says Baxi.

The new branding is based on impactful images, strong type and a more emotive tone of voice. Promotional imagery for the show Alone – about a group of survivalists who are sent to live in the extreme wilderness – features the statement ‘Man vs. a whole lot of dangerous stuff’ with ‘no crew’, ‘no content’ and ‘no help’ overlaid. Imagery promoting drama Vikings uses the phrase ‘Who Will Fall?’ to hint at rivalry, power and conflict. 

dixonbaxi_history_print_3DixonBaxi_History_Print_2The new branding applied to History's websiteHistory billboards designed by DixonBaxi

Althea

althea1.jpgAlthea is a new company in Greece that sells high quality organic dried herbs, ideal for perfecting flavorful meals. Sofia Papadopoulou developed this concept for their brand identity and packaging, making it a beautiful addition to any kitchen.althea5.jpgThe brand name is written in a calligraphy-style, handwritten font that emphasizes the care that goes into harvesting the herbs. Finely drawn illustrations feel like they’ve taken right out of a botanist’s notebook, making the connection to the well-tended, organic garden. Black and gray tones play well with the light, faded greens of the herbs. Small details, like a glossy image of the herbs on top of the tins or a string tied around the neck of a bottle, bring the whole brand together.althea6.jpgalthea2.jpg

Christmas Windows

This year’s Christmas window displays, are based on the theme of “Together We’re Merrier”, and have been devised as a comment on divisive events from 2016, including the US election and Brexit.

The windows feature stories of traditional arch-enemies but with happy outcomes, such as The Bull and The China, The Butcher and The Turkey, The Wolf and The Sheep, and The Boy and the Brussel Sprouts.

Continuing the theme into the store itself, the Atrium sees a giant sun and moon meeting in an embrace.

© Matt WrittleSelfridges, in-house

john-lewis-3John Lewis, in-house

harvey-nichols-britalia-christmas-windows-dinning-tableHarvey Nichols, in-house

workshopLiberty, in-house

HyperFocal: 0Schuh, by Roar