Tag Archives: Advertising

John Lewis goes for joy rather than tears this Christmas

John Lewis has created a cutesy, animal-led spot for its Christmas ad this year, which is gently funny rather than the usual tearjerker. But does it do enough for the brand to retain its Christmas ad crown?

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AllCreative

“AllCreative has a simple ambition,” says its founder, AMV BBDO creative chief Paul Brazier, “To reveal every creative job in the form of a short film that will inspire people a step closer to their chosen career. From a young age, I was given the impression that the creative arts were secondary and inferior to an academic career path. Later in life, I realised just how huge the creative industries are and their importance to Britain.”

H&M is rightly being applauded for its new fashion campaign

There is a new ad trend in town. For the last few years, advertising for women has been heavily focused on empowerment, with many brands overtly throwing their hats in with a feminist position. Recently though this has evolved into a wider movement towards diversity.

Diversity is in fashion right now, and hopefully it will stay that way. Ads are starting to reflect a desire from consumers for the communities that we live in to be more accurately reflected in our media: for the variety of different ages, races, shapes and styles that we see around us every day to appear on billboards and TV screens. The most recent example of this is this new, widely shared spot for H&M:

Designs of the Year – Design Museum

Architecture

This year’s architecture nominees include a vintage theme park, the Tate Modern’s Switch House extension and Assemble’s Granby Workshop in Liverpool – winner of this year’s Turner Prize.

Herzog and De Meuron's Switch House extension for Tate ModernHerzog and De Meuron’s Switch House extension for Tate Modern

Graphics

Fourteen projects were shortlisted in the graphics category this year. These include Irma Boom’s Cuyperspussagi tile mural in Amsterdam’s Central Station – an impressive seascape made out of 77,000 tiles – and Studio Joost Grootens’ redesign of the Dikke Van Dale dictionary of the Dutch language, which uses colour coded text and illustrations.

A first aid kit for refugees which uses pictograms.A first aid kit for refugees which uses pictograms. Idea & Design: Erwin K. Bauer, Anne Hofmann, Dasha Zaichanka, Katharina Hölzl, Miriam S. Koller
Cooperations & Partners: Red Cross Vienna, Caritas, Medical Aid for Refugees, New Here, EOOS design / Places for People at Biennale di Venezia 2016, Urbanize Festival ICC Berlin

unspecified-15HelloRuby, a book by Linda Liukas and Jemina Lehmuskoski. The pair have also created a website and accompanying apps. helloruby.com

Product

Nineteen projects made the product shortlist – alongside furniture, ceramics and objects designed for urban living environments, nominees include the BBC micro:bit, a pocket-sized computer that children can use to create games or virtual pets:

The BBC micro:bit, a collaboration between the BBC, Tech Will Save Us (which designed the shape, look and feel of the device), ARM, element14, Barclays, Lancaster University, Microsoft, Nordic Semiconductor, Samsung, ScienceScope and The Wellcome Trust
The BBC micro:bit, a collaboration between the BBC, Tech Will Save Us (which designed the shape, look and feel of the device), ARM, element14, Barclays, Lancaster University, Microsoft, Nordic Semiconductor, Samsung, ScienceScope and The Wellcome TrustThe Drinkable Book. Senior designer: Brian Gartside. Graphic designer: Aaron Stephenson. Chemist: Dr. Theresa Dankovich, PhDThe Drinkable Book. Senior designer: Brian Gartside. Graphic designer: Aaron Stephenson. Chemist: Dr. Theresa Dankovich, PhD

You can see the full shortlists at designmuseum.org

Powered by brand

Buzz_Bike_GROUP-1_V001_RGBBuzzbike has teamed up with Cooper (of Mini fame) bikes, who are providing the fleet of cycles. Riders pay a £100 deposit on sign up, which is returned at the end of the agreement, and are provided with a bike, plus a Hiplok DC bicycle lock, lights, insurance and servicing. In return they have to agree to cycle to work for a minimum of 12 days a month and park their bike on the street. This will allow the advertising on the bike to be seen, plus brands will also get access to data from the Buzzbike app which must be used by riders.

The first phase of the Buzzbike scheme begins in the autumn, and is backed by payment platform Braintree. Initially it will consist of only 100 bikes, though the plan is to launch a further 1,000 next spring (Buzzbike is running a crowdfunding campaign to support the later launch and also the evolution of the digital platform). For the project to work, customers must of course use the bikes, and will forfeit the deposit if they don’t – though Hares stresses that they are trying to be reasonable about this and will adjust the targets if a user is ill or if the weather is particularly bad one month.Buzzbike designed by Eley Kishimoto

Buzzbike designed by Smithtown

Buzzbike designed by Universal Everything

The arrangement with brand partners is also that the bikes will be ‘clustered’ in order to attract attention. This means that the areas where users live and work play a part in whether they will be chosen to take part in the scheme. “We localise the campaigns,” Hares explains. “The way we sign people up is largely on their home postcode and their work postcode, most importantly their work. Then we get a sense of where they’re going to be parking the bike – because they have to park on the street – and that allows us to cluster those campaigns so the bikes are going to be seen.”

So, initially at least, this isn’t a free bike scheme for just anyone – you will have to be based somewhere useful to the brands. “But ideally over time we can be as inclusive as possible, and get as many out there as possible, as we sign up with more brand partners,” says Hares.