Category Archives: dieline

The Art of Coffee

Coffee brand Maquina Coffee Roasters celebrates daring and whimsical coffee. The branding people created the brand’s visual identity and encapsulated the brand’s vision through design, dazzling shades, and wonderful textures. The packaging honors the product and what it took to develop it in a way that’s less of a cliche and more of a statement. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

LUSH Christmas

Not only bright and bold, but LUSH’s holiday packaging is also 100% recycled and reusable, and the ribbon is made from recycled drink bottles. In the theme of all things “fairy,” the brand’s packaging design is wonderfully eccentric, festive, and bound to make a statement under any Christmas tree. We love that the brand created packaging with a wild take on the holiday season, staying away from the overused and cliche red and green shades and, instead, exchanging them for yellows, pinks, and purples.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

The packaging is for the “Fairy Christmas” gift set – a massive gift box full of Snow Fairy treats. The illustration/design is a colourful psychedelic bubblegum world based on Lush’s popular Snow Fairy products.

The packaging is 100% recycled and reusable, and the ribbon is also made from recycled drink bottles. All of LUSH’s products are animal free, not tested on animals and ethically sourced.

Starbucks Christmas cups

“For the start of our campaign, we typically come up with a mood board that centers every piece of the creative for the full season, and so this year, we came up with the centering point around gifting and the elements that surround it, as well as elements that are really celebratory,” said Suzie Reecer, associate creative director at Starbucks.

Throughout each of the four holiday cup designs, these factors of wrapping and celebration can be seen visually throughout the entire campaign. From commercial to coffee bags to—obviously—the holiday cups, every aspect gets centered around celebration and the celebration of gifting. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

For example, the first design found inspiration in a perfectly wrapped gift, featuring a circular pattern in holiday hues. The next cup features delicate ribbons encircling the cup, creating a joyful dancing movement, and it’s a design near and dear to Suzie. “It really makes me think of when I wrapped presents with my mom, and you finish all the wrapping, and you look down, and there are ribbons all over the place in the most beautiful way,” Suzie added. 

The other designs are more typographically based yet still tie into the gift-giving motifs through ribbons, stripes, sparkles, and, of course, the classical holiday hues. 

And while each of these cups is innovative and refreshing from the past cups, there’s a new design element that, quite literally, wraps up the entire design. “We do have a major change and shift in our design system this year, in the best way, which is bringing forward a gift tag on each of our cups,” Suzie said. Baristas will now have a dedicated spot to write customers’ names or even a note so that each drink sincerely feels like a specially gifted treat. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Express yourself

Marta Veludo Studio is based in Amsterdam and often pulls influences from folk art, pop culture, bright color, and inspiring movements into her designs. In her most recent creation, Marta Veludo created the visual identity and packaging for Golden Apple’s new makeup line. The products infuse classic design elements with stereotypically GenZ inspiration, making for a line that inspires consumers to tap into new ways of expressing themselves. Each product is packaged uniquely but makes up a cohesive set with bold typography and punchy colors.

Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Elegantly Playful Wine Label

Jocelyn Tsaih is a Taiwan-born, Shanghai-raised artist currently based in Oakland, California, and, recently, the artist collaborated with Dom Maria, the Brazilian Sparkling wine brand. Tsaih’s designs are essentially blank canvases, allowing consumers to create a custom wine label that suits all the occasions they could need. Plus, even if you choose not to decorate the bottles further, the illustrations are lively, playful, and innocent enough to leave plain. 

Fighting Suicide one cup of tea at a time

UnLtd is a social organization that connects the media, marketing, and creative industry with charities working with at-risk children to ensure every young Australian has the opportunity to fulfill their potential. Recently, the non-for-profit organization wanted to create a product that could help these children in ways like never before. Enter Mood; a tea made to positively impact mental health for a generation that needs it the most. 

Maud, the creative agency based in Sydney and Melbourne, Maud had to get creative to develop a tea brand for a generation that’s not typically known as tea drinkers. The vivid and playful color system helps create a dynamic identity that pulls these consumers in, and the range of expressive typography keeps them there. Each flavor and blend is descriptive of a range of moods. For example, the Sweet Lullaby is a blend of Rooibos, Licorice, and Vanilla flavors intended to calm, comfort, and relax you. The color palette for this specific blend is made up of soft blue, purple, and pink hues, featuring an illustration of a person in their pajamas watching whimsical sheep bounce through the stars above. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

The Sydney-based artist Elin Matilda created the whimsical illustrations featured on each of the tea’s packaging, and they couldn’t be more positively mood-altering. Each of the blends, named by Maud, include Happy Days, Get On Up, Be Kind, Unwind, and Sweet Lullaby, feature a fitting illustration on the packaging paired with perfectly descriptive color palettes. 

It’s clear that the art direction and packaging were designed with one purpose: to uplift children going through tumultuous times in a subtle yet utterly thoughtful way. As a result, each tea’s packaging shares reasons to be hopeful, with authentic stories of positive change, with all profits going towards enhancing the mental wellbeing of others.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

And

Editorial photograph

And emerged in response to the question “How might we create a gender neutral brand identity for a line of period products?” Through extensive market research and brand discovery process, the identity of And began to take shape as an inclusive, high quality product line committed to meeting the needs of people with periods and disrupting outdated gender norms in the industry. And, inspired by the word ‘androgynous,’ is for him and her and them and you—And is for all of us. 

Gender dysphoria is defined as distress caused by a discrepancy between a person’s gender identity and their anatomy. For some trans, non-binary, and gender-nonconforming people, the experience of menstruation can trigger intense feelings of gender dysphoria, as many associate menstruation with femininity. This association perpetuates harm, as not all women menstruate and not all people who menstruate identify as women. The menstrual care industry plays an important role in redefining gender norms by exemplifying inclusive representation.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Laytown

Laytown is a village in County Meath, Ireland, overlooking the Irish Sea. Inspired by this village’s location, the branding for Laytown Soda Co is all things tropical. Designed by Jack McKeon, the color palette for the drinks is cheery and bright, everything you hope to feel while by the sea. Furthermore, the t-shaped logo doubles as an illustration of a beach umbrella, furthering the seaside theme. It’s evident that Laytown Soda is a brand that’s all about influencing a lifestyle that promotes a slow pace and 100% happiness.

Editorial photograph

A student project with Creative Direction from Dublin-based illustrator and designer Conor Merriman, the hypothetical Laytown Soda Co, based in County Meath, Ireland, put an emphasis on flavour over fizz. Their drinks offer fruity refreshment without being overpowered by an excessive sparkling sting.

The logotype, inspired by Laytown’s seaside location, features wavy letterforms and the letter ‘T’ doubling as an umbrella (or parasol considering how changeable the Irish weather is).

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Helvetica Now

Like The Office reruns and White Claw, Helvetica’s popularity remains unabated. Designed in 1957, the love for the sans-serif type hasn’t changed much, but the world in which designers use Helvetica and the world it resides in is very different. 

Monotype, now the stewards for the iconic font, took a big step forward in 2019 when it released Helvetica Now, an update with additions and changes that allows designers to apply the storied type in modern applications like smartphones.

The font’s full potential wasn’t realized, however, and Monotype has just announced the release of Helvetica Now Variable, an update that makes the typeface more pliable in designers’ hands. Variable adds the ability to blend weights, sizes from four-point to infinity, and new compressed and condensed widths. Monotype’s update makes it easier to use Helvetica in new, expressive ways, making the typeface adaptable for applications needing responsive typography.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

“Typographers (and good designers) know that headlines, text type, and tiny type each require special care,” Charles says. “Headlines benefit from tighter spacing and more refined letter shapes. Text type needs a breath more space and a greater emphasis on rhythm. Tiny type needs a larger x-height, breathy spacing, and more rugged forms. White type on a black ground requires different spacing than black on a white ground.” 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Packaging as sweet as it gets

If you’ve never had the pleasure of tasting a Brookie, a brownie, and a cookie in one, you’re severely missing out. Biting into one is like biting into a piece of heaven.

The pillowy texture and the rich nostalgic flavors make for the perfect sweet treat. With branding and packaging designed by Blank Design Studio, Brookies, the Brazil-based sweets and coffee shop has created an irresistible identity system. The vibrant color palette paired with the 1950s-inspired illustrations and typeface makes for a sweet escape.

Through the positioning strategy, we identify territories and differentials to explore in the minds of already fanatical Brookies customers. The good and warm nostalgia. Guided by this concept, a vibrant color palette and the “baking good times” tagline, we created an authentic, global, urban, fun platform with a touch of acid humor brought by its new symbol, inspired by the 1950s cartoons that explored an atmosphere of cunning and malice through their exaggerated and flashy expressions. A project as delicious as the best cookies in town.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph