Monthly Archives: September 2022

Ryvita rebrand

Founded in 1925 by John Edwin Garratt, Ryvita was brought to life when the world was a far simpler place – and consumer choice was much more limited.

The rye-based crispbread is one of those brands that many of us grew up with, but was typically viewed as as a ‘diet’ option for weight conscious mums.

Since Ryvita’s heyday, society’s relationship with health and wellbeing has shifted significantly, with a huge amount of choice springing up in the health food category. As a result, Ryvita has struggled to stay relevant in the ‘healthy alternative’ landscape.

The team behind the brand approched London-based branding agency Springetts to challenge traditional perceptions of the crispbread and reignite its relevance among consumers.

Through a combination of bold typography, accessible photography and a more playful tone of voice, the new brand looks to bring a new energy to the brand while remaining recognisably Ryvita.

springetts.co.uk

INNOM colourful identity

Oslo-born convenience store concept Innom is vying to be the exception to this rule, however. Offering a mixture of goods that places it somewhere between a grocery store, kiosk and bakery, the new concept is aiming to engage younger audiences in the Norwegian capital.

“The new store should be tailored for those who are short on time and need to take something with them on the go. It’s not a place you do your weekly shopping, but rather a place to drop in,” says Håvard Bergo, a designer at local creative agency Try.

The agency was recently commissioned to create a visual identity that nods to the convenience store’s mission, and in particular the name Innom, which translates as ‘drop by’.

“We centred the identity around a typeface that has a distinct link to the parent brand [grocery store] Rema 1000’s round visual language, but rather than being an extension of it, the Innom brand appears like a remixed and younger version,” says Bergo.

Branston Pickle brand

After Branston Pickle’s new logo and packaging design, both by This Way Up, were revealed earlier this summer, the condiments brand is launching a refreshed identity led by Wonderhood Studios.

The new visual and verbal identity leans into its lengthy heritage, having spent the last 100 years as a staple of many British kitchens.

According to Simon Elvins, head of art at Wonderhood Studios, it was an opportunity to “dust-off this quintessentially British brand”. The execution of the new identity is simple yet effective in reflecting the nature of the product and brand, featuring appropriately chunky type and a palette that draws heavily on the yellows and greens associated with Branston.

The copy does the heavy lifting in the brand campaign, Bring out the Branston, which mostly goes for a hit of nostalgia and warmth through references to childhood memories and family time, while injecting a bit of playfulness into the mix.

Jack McKeon, Limerick School of Art and Design

Jack McKeon’s portfolio is impressive in its breadth of media (packaging design, branding, illustration, animation) as well as its range of themes. At times, it’s commercially astute and slickly professional, at others, it’s using animation to explore ideas around community and societal division, or examining Irish cultural idiosyncrasies and the country’s deepening housing crisis.

Although his work started out with an illustrative bias, relying almost solely on imagemaking, his skill with typography emerged over time and is shown across a wealth of both speculative and real life projects, from soft drink branding, to a concept for a non-alcoholic events company, to theatre posters. The Project Arts Centre in Dublin recently commissioned McKeon to create a billboard reflecting on the current state of Ireland’s capital and what it means to those living there.

Laytown Soda Co. posters
Fression branding

SINNEK’s Bold Packaging System Visualizes The Bodywork Paint Brand’s Pillars

Sinnek is a car paint brand that promises its consumers quality, efficiency, technology, and color. The brand worked with Diego Bellorin to create a packaging system that visually translates these promises. The bold yellow hue and bold typography system create a packaging system that’s authoritative and professional while also showcasing the brand’s high-performance personality.

Light and springy new brand for Aevi

To cement its positioning as a payment partner, Anagram was tasked with updating Aevi’s branding – which had previously featured a bendy, only semi-legible wordmark. The studio focused on the ways the platform can set payments free, and built its new branding around that.

As such, the identity embraces what Anagram describes as a “light and springy” feel, focusing on loose rather than linear shapes. This is expressed via squiggly motifs and icons, as well as a new custom typeface, Aevi Basis – created by Colophon – that echoes the forms of global currency symbols.

Anagram has adopted a new colour palette as well, foregoing the “sea of blues that wash over the fintech space” for a mix of bright green, forest green, pink and coral.

Aevi’s new identity fits squarely into a burgeoning camp of finance brands embracing new approaches to design and branding, kickstarted by the likes of Monzo, Starling and Revolut in the 2010s and continued by a wave of new businesses such as Keebo and Everything.

BAZ & CO’s Basil-Based Skincare Products

The beauty industry is a crowded space. From organic products and vegan brands to “clean” lines, there’s not only a somewhat hazy description for just about everything, but a product for everyone. Yet, while some brands claim to be clean or organic,BAZ & CO  is a natural skincare line created by a farmer who knows a thing or two about raw ingredients. 

The strategy, branding, packaging, digital design, and digital development were designed by London-based agency Otherway. BAZ & CO gets named after its principal ingredient, basil, a plant known for its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. The green primary packaging hue reflects the herb’s prominence within the products. In addition, the sustainable, fully recyclable packaging is made of aluminum and glass, shedding light on the importance of sustainability, especially for nature’s sake.

Because the beauty industry is so overcrowded, Otherway wanted to ensure that BAZ & CO’s packaging and branding systems were distinct enough to stand out. Using recyclable materials and inks guarantees this, and the innovative and styled typography and design styles further highlight the brand’s sustainable intentions.  

The minimalistic design was strategic, yet it also leaves room for the brand’s inevitable growth. The system’s flexibility comes from the minimalistic aesthetic deployed by the agency, allowing new products to seamlessly become part of the line and adapt the green packaging with white typography and instruction manual-inspired illustrations. 

So, sure, farm-to-table meals have been around for a while, but farm-to-face skincare products are the latest and greatest addition to the skincare industry. 

Kick it out

The charity celebrates its 30th anniversary next year, with the organisation expanding its focus over the last three decades from racism in football through to all forms of discrimination in sport. It’s currently partnering with Sky Sports, and as part of the collaboration has developed new programmes for schools, editorial initiatives and MBA in football scholarships to tackle underrepresentation.

Sky Creative has replaced the previous sans serif wordmark with an energetic new football-shaped logo, which renders the name of the charity in what looks like duct tape.

According to the in-house studio, the aim was to express Kick It Out’s grassroots beginnings and also bring in a bit more attitude, and the new look undoubtedly has a lot more personality and vigour than Kick It Out’s previous branding.

It also seems much more adaptable, able to change colour to appear alongside the logos of football clubs, many of which are more intricate crest-style symbols. In these instances, the Kick It Out branding holds its own without undermining the club.

Its tape-style type also feels right at home in some of Kick It Out’s creative executions – for example, ‘If you see it or hear it report it’ pasted on the walls of the men’s toilet, or even at a larger size in the centre of the pitch.