Monthly Archives: January 2022

Giorgia Lupi tells her life story using hand-stitched data

The project, titled Book Of Life, was created for the Moleskine Foundation and is made from three notebooks that Lupi disassembled and then stitched back together into an accordion-esque book. She then set about adding a single white stitch for every day of her life since birth, adding second stitches in coloured thread to mark out milestones.

A colour code, shown at the start of the book, offers a guide to the significant moments the designer chose to mark. Yellow stands for a life achievement, red for love, pink for world events that had a significant impact on Lupi, and blue for big trips. Black and red crosses mark out losses and breakups, respectively.

“At the time I was about to turn 40 and I decided to use the notebooks to reflect on my life so far … I wanted to capture the totality of my life in paper and thread – both key events that I felt were pivotal to the trajectory of my life, and the mundane of the day-to-day.”

Branding Reflects The Low Maintenance Vibe

With a low maintenance vibe yet a high-frequency product, Qandor was tested regarding its packaging design. The beauty brand teamed up with design studio YUNGBLD studio to create packaging that spoke to its duality, and the result is a packaging system that’s refined yet funky, balancing the easy-going customer that wishes for impactful results. The color palette is soft yet impactful, allowing the typography to steal the show indeed. The squiggly Q is unmistakable, making the brand identity genuinely memorable.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Leva’s brand identity illustrates the realities of chronic pain.

Founded by a group of pain specialists and using a new treatment model that combines physiotherapy, psychology and medication, Leva is the UK’s first online chronic pain clinic, aiming to help people with persistent pain lead a better life.

Ahead of Leva’s launch, the team behind the clinic worked with London-based agency That Thing over a period of six months to define its brand. “Leva presented a great challenge: how do you create a brand that mixes a real caring humanity with expertise and rigour? We knew it couldn’t feel too soft but it couldn’t feel too clinical either. The result walks the line and is helping Leva to reach an audience that needs them,” says the agency’s co-founder, Joe Weir.

After naming the product ‘360 care’ and breaking down the treatment into ‘Mind, Movement, Meds’, the agency created a logo that reflected the clinic’s triangular approach to patients’ treatment. The rest of the design system is divided into two parts: soft and nurturing, and accurate and disciplined.

“To help evoke the feeling of pain, we reversed our design language and created a moody dark mode. Soft, free-flowing auras are contained within the typography, precluding the core ‘peaceful’ identity which becomes the pay-off,” says the agency.

Park Lane Hotel’s new identity

Park Lane, the luxury hotel in New York City, has launched a new identity designed to emerge from a “sea of old-world sameness” according to Mother Design, which was behind the new look.

“The previous branding, rooted in 70s luxury design, was in dire need of an update; not only from a visual perspective, but also to feel more inclusive,” Mother Design says. “We brought seasonality into the design, a super rich colour palette, and most of all brand language that’s both elevated and invitational; the poetic language entices locals as well as travellers.”

These ideas are central to the updated Park Lane wordmark, which taps into the appetite for Art Nouveau lettering at the moment. It features straight, architectural lines set against swooping, ornate curves designed to evoke “wandering paths” or “botanical tendrils”, according to the agency. The new wordmark has been condensed down into an icon (so far used minimally) in which the initials P and L are stacked on top of one another, the softness accentuated with ribbon-like detailing.

Lego and Yinka Ilori reimagine the humble launderette

Known for using vibrant colours and bold patterns, Ilori’s work injects joy into everyday spaces and tells stories that nod to his British-Nigerian heritage. The installation draws on the artist’s childhood memories of visiting the local launderette on Essex Road, north London, with his family, with help from a group of current students from his former school, St Jude & St Paul’s C of E Primary School.

On a visit to a local launderette, Yinka asked the young students how they would rebuild the space for the better and bring people in the community together. Their playful ideas shaped the transformation of elements typically found in a launderette from the banal to the fantastical.

The installation features a number of interactive experiences, including a giant mural wall that can be built, unbuilt and rebuilt by visitors, kaleidoscope laundry drums and vending machines that dispense Lego toys instead of soap. All of these experiences aim to demonstrate how children use play and creative problem-solving skills to turn everyday experiences into adventures.

Pantone’s colour of the year

This year, the organisation has announced Very Peri as its prediction for the year ahead – describing it as “a dynamic periwinkle blue hue with a vivifying violet red undertone”.

“Blending the faithfulness and constancy of blue with the energy and excitement of red, this happiest and warmest of all the blue hues introduces an empowering mix of newness,” says Pantone in a press release. The company goes on to explain that the colour is chosen as a reflection of our changing physical and digital lives, trends in gaming, and the popularity of the nascent metaverse.