Monthly Archives: October 2021

Scouts new Squirrels

The Squirrels programme aims to support young people in deprived communities most affected by the pandemic and also bring in families that may be new to Scouts. Its branding is bright, playful and fun and features its own logo, featuring a squirrel as the ‘S’.

The logo will eventually be used alone, when the Squirrels brand is more established, but initially will be used alongside the distinctive Scouts symbol to show it is part of the same family. The colours of the brand are also an extension of the main Scouts colour palette of red and yellow, with a number of woodland-themed colours added.



“Our approach to the Squirrels brand idea was to go back to the beginning of the Scouts story – Brownsea Island,” says Jamie Ellul, creative director at Supple Studio. “It felt appropriate to use the island’s flora and fauna as inspiration for the visual language and colour – especially as Brownsea is home to a brood of rare red squirrels.

Frontline19

In recent reports that two in five frontline staff are suffering with PTSD as a result of the pandemic – nearly double the rate of recent military veterans. While such information is clearly damning in terms of how those who bore the brunt of the pandemic are now coping, it is difficult to quantify what this means to their daily lives.

To help articulate this, and also to encourage the public to leave messages of support for frontline workers via a free phone service called Hopeline19, adam&eveDDB has created a film and poster campaign for the charity Frontine19. The film, which is a difficult watch, tells the stories of some of those on the frontline, from ambulance workers to ICU doctors and nurses, and how their experiences have affected their personal lives.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dH_sJEpqDSY&t=120s

Accompanying the film are outdoor, print and radio ads that also ask members of the public to leave messages of gratitude and support on Hopeline19. These will be moderated and then uploaded so that frontline workers can call and listen to kind words from the public, and targeted media will be displayed in and around hospitals to make frontline workers aware of the service.

“We’re humbled at what the doctors, nurses, emergency responders and thousands of other unsung heroes have achieved over the past 18 months,” says Ant Nelson, ECD at adam&eveDDB. “But while their actions may be heroic, they are human beings as vulnerable to mental health problems as the rest of us. Frontline19 has already done so much in such a short time, but we need to make sure their work can carry on and in turn help NHS workers get through this traumatic time.”

Credits:
Agency: adam&eveDDB
CCO: Richard Brim
ECDs: Ant Nelson, Mike Sutherland
Creative Directors: Darren Beresford, Richard Gayton
Creatives: Darren Beresford, Richard Gayton
Production Company: Academy
Director: Novemba

CALM

CALM is known for its headline-grabbing campaigns, such as Project 84, which saw 84 sculptures line the rooftop of the ITV building on London’s Southbank to represent the number of men who take their own lives each week.

The charity has now launched a new film, Stay, which relays moving anecdotes and experiences of bereaved family members as well as survivors. The film comes as the charity reveals its new branding led by design studio Output, with language developed by Reed Words. Output worked on CALM’s new brand identity for around six months from start to finish, and a new web platform is also in the works.

“The previous brand had great equity and was loved by many, but it was created for print, then applied to digital spaces. Refreshing it gave an opportunity to design the core identity with rigour across all formats: online, offline and beyond,” she says. “It meant we could consider accessibility, particularly around access to the most vital services like the webchat and helpline, alongside expressive communications which would allow more freedom” says Output partner and creative director Johanna Drewe.

The visual identity draws on high intensity palettes featuring flashes of neon, and is capped by a refreshed wordmark. In the new design, the charity’s name is aligned to highlight the CALM acronym, however it retains the speech bubble concept seen in its predecessor.

“The brand has to do so many different things, from support to activism, but it needs to always feel like CALM. We were also conscious that it should feel like a natural evolution – the next iteration of a much-loved brand, rather than something completely new,” Drewe says.CALM branding on postersstudio-output.com; thecalmzone.net

Science you can eat

Originally published in 1972, this Vicki Cobb classic was due for an update and redesign. This 256-page hands-on book of edible experiments makes it easy for kids to have fun with science. We were responsible for the design and illustration of the book from the typography system, the structure and layout of the experiments, to the informative technical illustrations, to the colorful chapter openers. We used a limited 2-color palette paired with modern, icon-driven illustrations to help take this book to a new generation of readers.

Find out more https://carpentercollective.com/project/science-experiment-book/

PT’s Coffee Roasting Co.

PT’s Coffee Roasting Company, established in 1993 in Topeka, Kansas was in need of a brand refresh as they celebrated their 25th anniversary. As we approached the brand identity re-brand, we were truly inspired by PT’s passion for exceptional coffee from seed to cup. It was important for the new identity to reflect their love of coffee from their direct trade relationships with the farmers to the retail clientele.

The inspiration behind the updated PT’s mark and identity happened on a visit to PT’s Coffee headquarters in Topeka, Kansas. Less than two miles from PT’s roasting facility, we drove by a herd of bison grazing on the Kansas prairie. The bison of the great plains represents strength, unity and abundance. PT’s wanted their new identity to be reflective of these same values as well and connect to their Midwest roots. The design style reinforces the hand-crafted nature of PT’s products—making their brand more approachable and memorable in the market.

Rochester Rhinos FC rebrand

Ahead of the 2022 season, Rochester Rhinos has launched a complete rebrand, including a change of name to Rochester New York FC, which steers it away from varsity-like naming conventions and more firmly into the world of soccer.

The rebrand was led by London-based agency A New Kind of Kick, which has been working on the project in both the US and the UK for the past year, including consulting with fans and key ambassadors for the club.

Along with the change of name, the club’s new badge features curvilinear details designed to evoke High Falls, a waterfall at the heart of the city, replacing the rhinoceros emblem that was previously central to the crest.

The waterfall symbolism carries through to design of the kit numbers, which have been adapted from the primary typeface, Knockout, to mimic the three lines seen on the badge.

The new branding is complete with a refreshed palette, trading the former dark green and mustard for a mint and slate combination, and a range of promotional assets that play with graphics and tap into the current trend of repeating type.

Tad Carpenter Sunday Sun

The American designer has spent the last six years drawing, painting, stitching or sculpting a sun every Sunday – and his work is collected in a book dedicated to his ongoing experiment.

“As a human, I was feeling overwhelmed, anxious, depressed, off, all of the emotional catchphrases you can think of, insert them here,” he remembers. “All was going great, yet I was not feeling like myself and I didn’t know why exactly.”

After an especially long week, one Sunday morning Carpenter says he couldn’t get to sleep and went to his studio to watch the sun come up. He started thinking about all the times, as a child, he was sent off to go and play – whether colouring in, building a fort or reading a book – and decided to designate a specific time each week to “just play”.

He knew he needed some kind of structure, and after deciding to take the sun as a recurring motif for the project has since designed dozens of different kinds – from stitched pennants and papier maché helmets, to typographic expressions and hand-drawn illustrations.

Sunday Suns, which is published by Counter-Print, brings together his efforts, placing them alongside essays written by Carpenter exploring his thoughts on creativity and life as a designer.

“It has thoroughly given me a sense of clarity. However, maybe the most important and unexpected aspect of this self-reflective experiment is how these little suns have provided hope to others.”

Sunday Suns is published by Counter-Print; counter-print.co.ukcarpentercollective.com