Monthly Archives: March 2021

Every little helps.

Maisie Benson and Holly Kielty have designed a set of guerrilla stickers that pop up in strategic locations around supermarkets, reminding shoppers to add a few items for their local food bank.

The pair had the idea for the Think Food Bank project after noticing that most donation stations are placed, unhelpfully, by supermarkets’ exits – meaning many people only see them once their shop is done and paid for. To encourage shoppers to remember food banks while they’re still browsing the aisle, the two designers created a set of illustrated stickers that can be stealthily stuck around the store – each tailored to the colour scheme of a different supermarket brand.

Some offer a generic message encouraging people to add items to their weekly shop, while others are designed to go in specific parts of the supermarket – for example ‘don’t forgetti, donate spaghetti’.

“We want our stickers to be wherever a shopper might simply think to donate – it’s too easy for people to forget food banks until after they’ve checked out and it’s too late,” says Maisie Benson, who’s a senior designer at B&B Studio in London.

“We were inspired by Marcus Rashford – he showed that every individual can make something truly positive happen,” says Kielty, a creative strategy director at Design Bridge. “Design has the power to do so much good and we just saw that there was a simple solution to a wider problem.”

The campaign is “guerrilla in style” as the pair describe it, but it’s hard to imagine any supermarket actively removing the stickers – 120 sets of which have been sent out, ready to find new homes in supermarkets across the UK.

Vegan skincare brand

Scottish vegan skincare is a genuine thing! With bold typography and the warmed fuzzies of the gradient, this brand designed by Too Gallus will give you a sentimental kick in the face every morning.

Too Gallus was enlisted to bring to life the brand identity in a way the reflected its bold and playful approach. With an audience of skin-care savvy Gen-xers it was essential that the product come to market swinging and instantly stood out as a name to watch in the beauty and skincare industry. The brand had to be exciting, and fun yet still carry its self with all of the weight and authority of a major player. We were conscious not to make the brand to novel and were aware that all through the process although the aim was to target a younger audience that the professionalism of the brand must never be lost.

Editorial photograph

When it came to packaging we knew we had hard competition in the current world of beauty and cosmetics, we needed to craft a product that not only had shelf appeal but was fun and interesting to receive when posted out through director to consumer commerce. We opted for a material focused approach. crafting holographic foil box outers with an embossed white gloss finish, channelling early y2k aesthetic. Our research presented us with futuristic materials, fun bold type and an ever shifting colour palette. paired with a minimal inner containers – using a screen printed logo type on the glassware. The result was a stunning, tactile product which harks older generations back to their formative years and serves Gen-X that tough of 2000s culture they love so much.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Honne brand

Honne Wellness reached out to Matilda Wilson Creative to take the reins on all things branding. Focusing predominantly on web design, since e-commerce was the brand’s platform, Matilda Wilson Creative cultivated the brand identity so that every detail was cohesive and straightforward. This allows for trust to be built in the brand, as well as minimal, yet intentional elements to be incorporated. The labeling and packaging was designed with that same notion in mind; hence, the typewriter font and the aesthetically pleasing photographs included in the design work. Muted and neutral tones set the scene for the brand to put the main spotlight on the nature of the organic ingredients.

Honne Wellness is wellness in synergy, with alchemy. The products are designed by our team of naturopaths and nutritionists, taking a holistic approach to our unique needs as women. Derived from whole food sources, we use absolutely no synthetic ingredients, preservatives, fillers, or additives. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

Honne’s e-commerce focus meant that their user experience and web design was pivotal to the brands success. Through strong copy, professionally-shot content, and a digital strategy that effectively paired key messaging and brand transparency with clear call-to-action, we were able to communicate to audiences without overwhelming them or straying away from the brand’s style.

Editorial photograph
Editorial photograph

The Skuratov Coffee

Editorial photograph

White Russian Studio had their fun when creating the brand identity for Skuratov Coffee Roasters. Defying any and all stereotypes behind coffee, they aimed to package and design the labels so that anybody that happens upon it on a shelf has no choice but to take a second glance.

Editorial photograph

The idea behind our branding for Skuratov Coffee Roasters was to make it more clear and defined, giving it a chance to cut through all the noise and perceptions that come with traditional coffee roasters and cafes today. 

Editorial photograph
Editorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

David Mack

Came across this artist and loved his style.

David Mack is the New York Times Best Selling author of the KABUKI Graphic Novels, cover artist for FIGHT CLUB by Chuck Palahniuk, the writer & artist of Daredevil from Marvel Comics, including DAREDEVIL: End of Days which debuted in hardcover as #1 on the New York Times Best Sellers List (Co-written with Brian Michael Bendis), and the author of his children’s book THE SHY CREATURES from MacMillan.

007.jpg
004.jpg

frontcoverfin-01.png
Reflections presents a selection of David Mack’s art, including sketches, finished paintings, sculptures, and other various forms, giving the reader a gorgeous look at his creative process.

Mack has illustrated and designed music albums for both American and Japanese Labels, including work for Paul McCartney, Amanda Palmer, Thomas Jane, Vincent D’Onofrio, painted Tori Amos for her RAINN benefit calendars, acted as storyboard artist & asst. Director for Dead Can Dance music video, designed toys and packaging for companies in Hong Kong, animation art for MTV, ad campaigns for SAKURA art materials, written and designed video game characters for film director John Woo and Electronic Arts, wrote the interactive animated viral promo for Mission Impossible four, and contributed the artwork for Dr. Arun Ghandi’s essay on the “Culture of Non-Violence”.

Find more work at davidmack.com

San Francisco Symphony’s new identity brings classical music up to date.

For many years, classical music has suffered from an ongoing PR problem, which portrays it as unchanging, old-world and elitist, and therefore unable to appeal to new audiences.

San Francisco Symphony decided to tackle these preconceptions head on with its recent diversity- and inclusion-focused organisational overhaul, following the appointment of conductor and composer Esa-Pekka Salonen as its new music director.

“It’s true that the origins of classical music are hundreds of years old, if not more, but the general population doesn’t tend to realise that it has been in a constant state of flux since its inception,” says Collins creative director, Louis Mikolay.

“It has been defining and redefining itself with each generation – even woven into movie scores, video games, and beyond. Classical music has an incredible amount to offer all of us, especially in such a stressful time. We have been honoured to work with the multi-talented teams at The San Francisco Symphony to help broaden its relevance in the modern world.”

McDonald’s ads promote home delivery service

The posters are the latest in a long running series of ads from McDonald’s that have taken a simple, minimalist approach, making clever visual use of its iconic branding or its products to send a message to its audience.

In this set of images, one half of the golden arches logo is shown beaming into homes, with the simple statement ‘We Deliver’ below. The houses featured include a range of architectural styles from modern tower blocks to a Victorian terraced house.

The new campaign appears the week that a rebrand of McDonald’s’ packaging was released, which also uses a simple, illustrative approach. Both the rebrand and these minimalist ads reveal a confidence in just how well known its branding is to both its regular customers and the wider world, and that McDonald’s is not afraid to use these assets in a powerful and striking way.

Credits:
Agency: Leo Burnett London
CCO: Chaka Sobhani
ECD: Mark Elwood
Creative directors: Andrew Long, James Millers
Creatives: Andrew Long, James Millers, Will Rees
Designer: Sam Kallen

McDonald redesign packaging

McDonald’s has teamed up with independent design agency Pearlfisher to redesign the brand’s global packaging system. The focus is on a bold graphics system that aims to “bring a sense of joy and ease”, and uses vector style illustrations to represent different items on the fast food chain’s menu. 

Pearlfisher has ambitiously designed a “single visual framework for the brand’s portfolio of products” by highlighting hero ingredients on the packaging, to create something instantly recognisable to its customers. 

On the Big Mac sandwich box, for instance, layers of the famous burger are captured in a cartoonish cross-section, the McMuffin wrapper is simplified with a big yellow yolk in the middle of a crinkly white background and, although the fries packet remains relatively similar in its red and yellow colourway, there is now the addition of pointy fries on the inside of the box.

Sia says the team tried to bring personality through simple illustrations to allow the packaging to be functional, easy to identify, aesthetically minimal and emotionally joyful. “Everything in this system has a purpose and helps activate McDonald’s’ brand positioning to make delicious, feel-good moments easy for everyone,” he adds.

Reverting to Type exhibition features protest posters.

The online exhibition features a mix of famous names and less-heard voices, who all use letterpress techniques to express their feelings on a range of contemporary issues.

Fakt/Fake by Erik Spiekermann
Boris_Johnson by New North Press and Stewart Lee
We Got Brexit Dumb by John Christopher, Flowers & Fleurons

“Our idea was to unite everyone in a letterpress show where the emphasis was on the message of the work, rather than just the technique,” continues Ardagh. “The special collaborative print editions we produced were our way of making sure that the voices we were representing were diverse. This had begun early last year when we worked with a talented group of adults with learning disabilities who had clear ideas about the issues they wanted to communicate. We wanted to do something similar with a group from the local homeless community but the virus made that impossible. We did manage to connect with a Senegalese asylum seeker and produce a poster based on their sketches but didn’t manage to broaden this out as being associated with speaking out put their application at great risk.

Fairness by New North Press and Extinction Rebellion Art Group / Paris68redux
Ladies! Being Singled Out by Gender vs. Ability is a Confidence Boost! by Jennifer Farrell, Starshaped Press
No Safe Place by Anthony Burrill
Our Solidarity by Dave Darcy, One Strong Arm
What a mess by Dafi Kühne, babyinktwice

Reverting to Type can be viewed online at revertingtotype.comnew-north-press.co.uk

Habito’s new identity

The mortgage company has worked with Uncommon on an unexpectedly psychedelic rebrand, which lives in a “euphoric dreamscape”

The world of finance and mortgages aren’t the first place you’d look for fantastical branding, but Habito’s new identity is shaking off the stuffy typefaces and restrained colour palettes in favour of what Uncommon describes as “phantasmagoric” visuals.

The studio has introduced a new logo and series of graphics – designed in partnership with New York artist Saiman Chow. The brand’s former word mark – which was very much part of the geometric sans serif movement – has been replaced with a chunky ‘winged’ typeface, which apparently speaks to the ease of getting a mortgage via Habito.

It’s also part of a mortgage heaven vs hell narrative the brand has set up, which includes animated TV adsdepicting towering stacks of paper and grasping tentacles as the nightmare alternative to Habito.

But while it’s great to see more brands using expressive typefaces, where the identity really shines is in the swirly dreamlike textures and graphics that form the backdrop.