Monthly Archives: September 2020

New campaign on Gen Z & tech

A new campaign by Saatchi & Saatchi is sticking up for the young people who get flak for being glued to their screens. Directed by Vincent Haycock, the film at the centre of the #WhatWeDoNext campaign offers an uplifting and compelling counter-argument to the theory that young people are out of touch due to social media and other tech. Instead, it illustrates the many ways young people are instigating positive change, oftentimes using technology to get the word out.

“We wanted to capture the spirit of this generation and show their collective voice harnessed by their use of social media. They are a generation that uses technology and social media to raise awareness and create communities,” Director Vincent Haycock said of the film. “We set out to make a film that felt honest to each of the characters’ world. Most of what you see is either their actual world or inspired very closely by who they are or what they represent. Billie’s is the voice of this generation, her music and words are very important to Gen Z. Having her narrate the film couldn’t have been a better choice.”

Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi
Global CCO: Kate Stanners
CCO: Guillermo Vega
ECDS: Franki Goodwin, William John
Creatives: Mia Silverman, Francesco Grandi
Production company: Somesuch
Director: Vincent Haycock

Has Seb Lester designed the most intricate S

Lester describes the piece as “arguably the most intricate letterform that has ever been drawn”, explaining that it’s informed by a career spent studying incredibly detailed type.

It’s a contemporary take on the illuminated letters that would have decorated manuscript pages of old, except it’s stuffed with hundreds of symbols – many of which will be recognisable to modern day designers. Look closely and you can spy relatively recent inventions such as the smiley and the Xbox logo, alongside more complex designs that draw on more historic sources.

“The piece includes symbols and patterns that chart the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, through to modern symbols, logos and emoji,” writes Lester, who spent several years as a type designer at Monotype, before focusing on his work as a calligraphy artist.

Beautiful Asian and Islamic ornament features prominently as well, so this is a truly international affair.

Beautiful Brands

While a logo alone may be enough for smaller companies, a successful brand design will create a cohesive look throughout your business while representing your brand values. In addition to a logo, branding design can include marketing collateral, websites, menus, uniforms and even the physical business space. For inspiration on brand design, we’ve collected some excellent examples that will not only show you a variety of applications, but will also outline different branding approaches commonly used today.

Kreate brand design
Kreate brand design by goopanic
Brand design
The Golden House Of Gaea brand design by Yokaona
Brand design
Brighton & Brighton Beach ELC brand design by Studio Brave
Brand design
Danish Design Award brand design by Kontrapunkt
Brand design
For Kids by Kids brand design by torvs
Brand design
Zen Zero Artisan Gelato brand design by SpoonLancer

Beer brand Caravelle

Design studio Hey has worked with restaurant and brewery Caravelle on creating colourful packaging for its new range of craft beers. The Barcelona-based studio previously teamed up with Caravelle back in 2017 on its initial beer range, and was enlisted once again to help it flesh out the existing design system as the brewery relocates to a larger location to keep up with demand.

Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle
Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle
Branding for craft beer brand Caravelle

The packaging takes a geometric turn across the rest of the range, with a pixelated bit graphic applied to Galactic IPA and a colourful striped design showcasing the Electric Relaxation XPA.

moonlit

Working with the Creative Director and in-house creative team at Moonpig, Ian Styles team have completely overhauled the brand. Most of the work was done with our team embedded directly within the creative department, which was crucial to understanding the culture, customers, and vision for the business. 

Building on their new positioning our idea was a simple one; create a whole new world for Moonpig, one where we imagine that we live life on the moon, where the normal rules don’t apply.

We seek to capture people in our new world’s gravity, pulling them towards us for a moment, offering an escape, where boring is banished, the obvious avoided and where life, is more fun and lighthearted.

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Kaibosh new identity

Eyes before guys, y’all. Snask developed a new, hip brand identity for an eyewear company in Norway, Kaibosh. Combined, the text, color palette, and copy give Kaboish a young and fun personality, instantly making the experience of going to get your eyes checked—which is pretty boring—way better. The approach also allows the frames to truly stand out in the store, helping consumers find stylish frames that suit them perfectly.

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New

“We got contacted by the Norwegian eyewear company Kaibosh. They felt that they had become too boring as opposed to what they should be, a trendy and bold eyewear brand. They felt their identity was too clean and they wanted to be more expressive and outgoing. The fashionable contender would finally get a fitting dress as well as a lovely new voice. We got the assignment to start out with keeping their existing logotype and from that develop their new brand ranging from signs, ads, packaging, bags, posters as well as create their entire flagship store.”

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Huxtaburgers’ brand

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Who knew a take out bag could be a statement piece?

HUXTABURGER wanted to create a clarified brand position that clearly identified their community and allowed for improved social uptake & engagement. By Refining and articulating the brand story and messaging framework, the aim was to capture and communicate the brand’s personality, which had previously been disconnected in visuals and voice.

The design inspiration came from graphic landscapes that took inspiration from destinations in which Huxtaburger operates and the visual look of the ingredients they use. The characters that you’ll discover throughout the visual identity embody Huxtaburger’s brand positioning by portraying people doing extreme things. The typography/logotype design was a refresh of the existing logo, uniting past and present with added confidence and strength.

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Dogs now run on Dunkin

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In support of Dunkin’ Joy in Childhood Foundation whose mission is to “provide the simple joys of childhood to kids battling hunger or illness,” both brands are offering dog toys modeled after the doughnut-and-coffee chain’s hot cup and Munchkin box, which includes three squeaky, fetchable versions of their ubiquitous doughnut holes. Money raised will go to support programs such as “Dogs for Joy,” which supports in-residence dogs in hospitals. These puppers help calm child patients and put the kids at ease during procedures and treatments.

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