Monthly Archives: July 2020

Branding an Olympic athlete

While gymnastics is Tulloch’s main focus, he is also keen to build a platform beyond competitive sport – whether through mentoring young athletes and working with youth groups or launching his own range of clothing and merchandise. For someone who grew up looking up to athletes like Cristiano Ronaldo, Roger Federer and Michael Jordan, success isn’t just about winning medals or standing on the podium – it’s also about using your platform to inspire and motivate others and having a wider cultural impact.

“It’s always been my dream and my goal to have a brand,” he tells CR. “I look at people like Ronaldo and Jordan and their brand and what they have … and they’re more than an athlete or a sportsperson,” he tells CR. “I love inspiring people, I’m into fashion, I’ve got a lot more that I want to do outside of gymnastics as well, so that’s something I’ve always wanted.”

Thanks to a collaboration with branding agency JKR, Tulloch now has his own visual identity, and a soon-to-be-released clothing range featuring upbeat phrases inspired by his attitude to sport. The identity launched earlier this year, and Tulloch hopes it will help him build his profile and reach a wider audience outside of gymnastics.

BECO Steal our staff

Having staff poached is typically a brand’s worst nightmare, yet toiletries brand Beco welcomed it with open arms in its provocative #StealOurStaff campaign.

The campaign was created by TBWA\London, which had already been working with Beco on getting its products stocked in leading retailers such as Boots, Waitrose and Sainsbury’s. The brand includes organic, paraben-free and plastic-free toiletries in its range, but it is the people that make Beco what it is. With 80% of its workforce disabled, disadvantaged or visually impaired, the social enterprise is gunning for change when it comes to the disability employment gap sustained by the biased hiring practices of many businesses. It’s a widespread issue that seems missing from wider discourse, which is what #StealOurStaff set out to change.

At the heart of the project’s concept was its packaging design, which features CVs of Beco employees. “It’s like an upside-down recruitment campaign,” TBWA\London chief creative officer Andy Jex says. The packaging takeover was joined by tweets sent to business leaders, a website-turned-recruitment portal that also contained advice for employers interested in hiring people with disabilities, and an accompanying spot on Channel 4. Made in collaboration with production company Hoi Polloi, the film stars real Beco employees contradicting the less-than-adequate audio description (AD) voiceover.

The film concept emerged from encounters with Beco staff working at the factory – particularly one team member who ridiculed Netflix’s questionable AD. It soon evolved into a tongue-in-cheek testament to the fact that people with disabilities are not short on humour. The aim was to be more lighthearted and less worthy, with the approach highlighting just how misleading media representations of disabled people can be – “particularly in advertising”, Jex notes.

Haarala Hamilton photography

Haarala Hamilton logo design by LanternAward-winning photographers Liz and Max Haarala Hamilton are well known for their portrait, food, travel and editorial creative. They have featured in various publications globally, including Huck Magazine, Boat Magazine, The Observer Magazine and Observer Food Monthly.

The simple branding system showcases Liz and Max’s greatest works across applications including business cards and portfolio brochures. Alongside photography, a suite of creative headlines play on the ‘Haa Ha’ wordmark, bringing life to conventionally mundane collateral including invoices and packing tape.

Haarala Hamilton brand marketing materialsHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton branded merchandiseHaarala Hamilton web design by Lantern

Created by Lantern

Createing a better future for every child

NCB approached Lantern to help redefine and articulate its mission both internally and externally. We delivered a strategic and creative toolkit, covering everything from a boilerplate summary statement, to a brand manifesto, a new set of values, a clearer process and of course a new identity – all designed to define the brand with clarity and conviction.

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Following a series of stakeholder workshops, they developed a new strategy to better articulate the charity’s point of difference. Their first step was to reframe the sense of unity within the organisation. Previously, ‘United for a better childhood’ meant being united internally, which wasn’t a compelling story for fundraising. Our research revealed NCB did far more than this – uniting central and local government, charities, schools, the media, and society as a whole. This meant they weren’t just impacting on the lives of individual children, but the lives of an entire nation.

The logo captures the very essence of ‘United for a better childhood’. A star, a jumping figure, an upwards arrow – the symbol provides a refreshed energy and sense of optimism.

NCB logo design process by LanternDesign of NCB app displayed on iPhoneNCB badge of Logo designed by Lantern

A bespoke, illustrated typeface builds on the concept of many elements uniting, whilst the illustration style provides the opportunity to communicate complex issues in a simple and intelligent way.Bespoke designed typeface for the National Children's Bureau

The new brand is flexible enough to appear playful and engaging, whilst also being able to communicate to government officials and policy makers. As well as flexing for different audiences, the brand system is designed to work for both print and digital applications.NCB supporting logo graphic

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Futr rebrand by Lantern

The identity revolves around Futr’s new winking face logo, which will also appear as the friendly avatar alongside messages exchanged with the company’s chatbots. Futr allows companies to have AI-powered conversations with customers – automatically answering queries where it can, and passing anything else onto a real person.

Lantern’s identity is intended to step away from the “abstract shapes and chat bubbles” that are found across the tech sector. According to the studio, the palette of yellow, pink and green is a deliberately optimistic choice, that helps set Futr apart from the “corporate teal” of its competitors. The sans serif font is Telegraf, from Pangram Pangram Foundry.

San Francisco Civic Music Association Brand

The San Francisco Civic Symphony wanted to grow as an organization and experiment with new genres, while fostering their legacy within San Francisco. We performed a brand audit leading to a full rebrand, messaging, and campaign to launch their new name and look at the 2018 Gala event. The rebrand injected creativity and imagination to represent the unique diversity of the organization. We paired modern letterforms in a non-linear sequence to represent notes on the scale. The new logo became the centerpiece for all collateral, helping to establish the brand in the community and build equity around the new identity.

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The results have attracted new participants, increased the number of musicians in the association and ultimately opened up more musical variety to a the San Francisco community.

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Find more here.

Eva branding

Meet Eva, a Women’s Health Technology Company Making The Bra That Senses Breast Cancer. We collaborated with Julián Ríos, founder and CEO, to create the full brand expression for Eva.

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After creating a full brand strategy, product naming and brand pillars, we created a custom wordmark, icon and brand identity to reflect Eva’s unique technology. The Bra™ is the first intelligent, portable, and non-invasive wearable designed to detect abnormalities in the thermal patterns of the breast, an indicator for the possible presence of breast cancer. After launching their first three clinics, Eva has achieved a 117% month-over-month growth in clinical users, continuing to help empower women in a safe and friendly environment.

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Find more here.

Fuse coffee

Fuse coffee’s branding system utilizes red, blue, and black dots to create it’s identity system. These dots overlap and meld together, bringing a playful element to the name “FUSE.” The branding exercise proves that the design is unique, playful, and innovative. Fuse your morning with this coffee for a day that is sure to be a success. Editorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photographEditorial photograph

Love Wellness redesign

So Bosworth decided to consult the experts and invent a better approach—and in 2016 she launched Love Wellness, a line of curated body-positive health products for women.

The brand has had a couple different identities over the years, but hit its stride with its latest look, created by Lobster Phone and released this spring.

The San Francisco–based design firm delivered a new identity, website, packaging and creative strategy.

As Lobster Phone writes, “Inspiration for the logo was found in a late 1930s Art Deco type specimen; it felt playful, chunky and expressive. We used this as the basis for creating custom letterforms that are both clear and iconic. As illustrations are foundational to the larger brand, we made the ‘V’ of the logo into a face with lips that kiss and talk. Each product has its own quirky name, corresponding illustration and color combination that provide a not-so off-the-shelf look. The illustrations play off the style of the logo’s lips—an almost Japanese pop aesthetic—clearly demonstrating the benefits of the product in a dynamic way.”

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THC PHYX

Editorial photographEditorial photographPHYX’s branding and visual identity, developed with help from agency FuseboxWest, are designed to appeal to the modern cannabis consumer who is more interested in cannabis’ effect on wellness, with a contemporary and luxe bottle design that is stylish and shows little sign of it being an infused drink. This gives the impression that Phyx is a premium bottled water.Editorial photographEditorial photograph

“VOSS bottles have a distinctive shape with brand equity that consumers associate with higher quality than traditional water bottles,” says Dan Gardenswartz, Chief Financial Officer of Spherex. “By choosing a similar shape and look, we wanted to leverage the feelings of quality already associated with VOSS to show the consumer this product is different.”

“The product design is more similar to wellness-focused CPG than typical cannabis fare,” Dan adds. “We wanted the packaging to be unlike any other product a consumer would see in a cannabis dispensary. Whether it is just a single bottle or [it’s] one of our four-pack boxes, when PHYX is standing next to other cannabis-infused beverages, it stands out.”Editorial photograph