Monthly Archives: October 2019

Let’s get talking again

A new ITV print campaign, created by Uncommon, continues a campaign that asks us all to tune back in – but to our own living rooms instead of the TV.

The ads remind readers of the value of stopping to check in on someone, ask how they are, and take a moment to have a chat – even if this means pausing the football to do so. It’s surprising to see a broadcaster encouraging viewers to take their eyes off the TV, but it’s all part of ITV’s Britain Get Talking initiative, which hopes to persuade people to communicate more and improve their mental wellbeing. It follows on from a series of TV adverts showing well-known ITV presenters offering a moment of quiet, in which viewers can turn to one another and chat instead.

Logo Design

Here a recent job I completed for a local Belfast business.

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The logo rebrand is simple with clean lines to highlight the business. I also completed a simple business card design. stranmillis business cards.jpg

For more examples of my work follow me on Facebook.

 

Jake Newbury

Jake Newbury’s interests are broad, though it’s clear he’s naturally inclined towards underground scenes. Having recently graduated from the Design for Publishing course at Norwich University of the Arts – where he specialised in editorial design and illustration – the designer has created eye-catching spreads based on streetwear brands like Carhartt WIP and Stone Island, as well as experimental producer Aphex Twin.

Newbury’s penchant for distressed visuals comes through in these projects, but his wider portfolio demonstrates an eye for sleeker styles.

Phoebe McCughley

“Basically, it’s 25 frames per second and it’s a very insane way of doing things, really,” says Phoebe McCaughley of her painstakingly crafted animations. Working with scraps of fabric and leftover packaging – which she uses to build her characters – McCaughley has found an innate talent for recreating natural movement. She’s also shown a deft hand for dealing with the big topics such as motherhood and mental health, which she manages to explore with an element of light-heartedness.

Not only is her work charming and relatable, it’s a reminder of just how enjoyable stop motion can be, when it’s done right.

New Skincare Line

To launch a skincare line in today’s oversaturated beauty market, you need to be confident that your target demographic will be on board. With the launch of Plenaire, a new UK-based brand, they’ve gone to the source, working closely with a Gen-Z focus-group that likely helped shaped HBO’s Euphoria as well?Editorial photographThe packaging for the line they developed with the help of design firm Pentagram skews minimal, with the tubes light, pastel-pink and signature lilac (named ‘Cresyl’ after the purple histological stain cresyl violet) with small particles to add a layer of texture. Minimalist, yet striking enough to work into your “shelfies,” the design of Plenaire comes elevated without being overly flashy. Their online presence is also minimalist and inclusive, as any brand speaking to Gen Z should be. Editorial photographEditorial photograph

Naomi Anderson-Subryan

Naomi Anderson-Subryan would spend a year trying to make it as an actor and another four years working in retail before realising that her calling was in the art world. After doing an art foundation at Camberwell College of Arts she decided to stay on to do a degree in illustration.

What is immediately clear from looking through the illustrator’s work is that she doesn’t take herself too seriously. Her ceramics experiments are brilliantly bonkers, in particular the three-part ‘play’ she created for her degree show, where characters including a ceramic piggy bank, Siamese cat and cowboy on horseback took to the stage.

Hollie Fuller

“I’ve loved to draw for as long as I can remember, so it makes sense that I ended up falling into illustration,” says Hollie Fuller. She started out studying fine art and photography at A-Level and delved into a bit of everything while on a foundation course before returning to her main love when she joined the Illustration course at Leeds Arts University.

Fuller’s pastel-hued illustrations have a knack of transforming everyday acts, such as using public transport, into scenes that are full of character, and have so far earned her commissions from the likes of art gallery The Hepworth Wakefield.

Hope is power

Creative agency Uncommon worked with the Guardian on its first brand campaign in seven years, which aims to highlight its reporting as a positive force for change.

The ad campaign centres around a butterfly, a symbol of both freedom and transformation. Bold, bright and stark, the posters place the focus on words and language, in an attempt to reinforce the sense of clarity and transparency that the Guardian aims to provide. Meanwhile, phrases like ‘Confused? Overwhelmed? Misled? That’s how they want you’, demonstrate an inevitably political slant, referencing other media outlets as well as politicians.

The butterfly allegory is brought to life in the accompanying campaign film by James Marsh, the Oscar-winning director behind The Theory of Everything. Here, the butterfly tirelessly bangs against a glass window in an attempt to escape to the outside world. As the lyrics of Anais Mitchell’s Nothing Changes solemnly sound out, the butterfly eventually bursts through the glass, where it joins a legion of others in freedom.

Anthony Burrill shows support for Extinction Rebellion

The designer has created a series of posters and graphics to support XR’s protests in central London, also joining supporters at a live printing workshop in Trafalgar Square.

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Designer Anthony Burrill has created a series of graphics and slogans to support this week’s action. He has also joined in with the protests, taking part in a live print workshop at Trafalgar Square on Wednesday.

His designs aim to encourage others to think about their own carbon footprint and the steps they can take to reduce their impact on the environment. “I was thinking about change and those small changes we can make to our lives that have a bigger effect when we all do them,” he explains.

With his use of bold type and bright colours, Burrill’s aesthetic feels like a natural fit with Extinction Rebellion’s visual identity. The group has become known for its striking graphics, posters and props, which draw inspiration from protest movements of the 50s and 60s.