Monthly Archives: August 2019

Ute

Studio.Build designed the packaging, creating a minimal interpretation of sunlight peering through the leaves – in deliberate contrast with the more ‘full on’ approach of many other craft beer labels.

“We wanted the project to be in keeping with North’s overall look and feel – using shapes, lines, musical influences, repeating patterns and to look clean,” says the brewery’s Christian Townsley. “We were keen to steer clear of the more cartoony design work seen on beer cans – it looks great and works for some breweries but wouldn’t be the right fit for North.”

Organic packaging

“Tangent GC specialises in organic care products. Their range of garment, shoe and skin care products are sold around the world. To celebrate 4 new fragrances for their organic soaps we have created a limited edition of 100 unique hand painted soap boxes.”TGC_x_Stenerhag_Collage2.jpg

Forwards is boring

Opting to keep things simple but effective, Desigual hasn’t meddled with its typeface (which was already a simple sans-serif, resembling many of the more recent logo redesigns to surface lately). Instead, the Spanish clothing brand has opted to flip the whole logo altogether. While the ‘S’ in Desigual had already reversed, it has permanently flipped the remaining letters to match, so it now reads entirely in reverse.

The refresh is designed to mirror Desigual’s positioning as a brand that doesn’t follow the norm, from its outlandish clothing lines right down to its name, which literally means ‘different’ in Spanish. The logo redesign was launched as part of the label’s new Forwards Is Boring campaign, headed by Desigual’s in-house creative studio and Amsterdam-based agency We Are Pi. With the campaign also comes a newly redesigned website and a capsule clothing collection showcasing the new logo.

“The objective of the campaign, in addition to presenting the company’s surprising new image which makes it the first international brand to permanently rotate its logo, is to invite people to think. To make them feel awkward. To make them step outside of their comfort zones. Which is exactly what we’ve done,” said Guillem Gallego, Desigual’s CMO.

Though it might not seem like the most original approach, Desigual claims to be the first brand to permanently flip its logo – surprising given how obvious it seems at first glance. Some have responded with weak retorts on how the brand name is pronounced or indeed written in reverse, however it seems likely that these kinds of campaigns will engage consumers, rather than just confuse them. Plus, as such a recognisable name to so many, Desigual can evidently get away with it.

Oat-ly milk?

While oat milk’s popularity is just gaining momentum in the US, it got its start in Sweden back in the early 1990s. Rickard Öste, a food scientist at Lund University, researched options for a milk replacement that could provide a more sustainable solution and also be suitable for those with lactose intolerance. Essentially, he discovered a way to make the fibers of oats into a liquid, and shortly afterward he founded Oatly.

So why didn’t oat milk get added to cafe menus back in the 90s when it first became available? 

“Design-wise, it was sort of in the lactose intolerance category, so it wasn’t really considered food for everyone,” explained Lars Elfman, Design Director at Oatly. So when Toni Petersson was appointed CEO of Oatly in 2012—nearly two decades after the invention of oat milk—the first thing he did was hire one of the Creative Directors to turn the brand around.5268.jpgoatly-ice-cream-today-main-190620_3d1fb261dbf0c58d525e883825538d3f.jpgOatly-range-with-chilled-milk.jpg

The team certainly had their work cut out for them, after all, when they started they were an ad agency, not a design company. “I hadn’t made food packaging before,” confessed Lars. Still, they looked at the challenge as an opportunity to do something different—so different, in fact, that when they first approached Tetra Pak about printing the design they’d created, the packaging company initially said no. “They looked at it and were like, ‘You’re not going to be happy.’ They were worried about smearing and about some of the large dots becoming too big. So we bought a big roll of paper to have them do a test print first.”

The result? It came out perfectly. Lars said they’d done something no one else had done before, and that Tetra Pak had worked wonders with their packaging—although it was a good learning process for Oatly overall.

In going against the expectations of what food packaging should be (as well as what other brands gravitate towards), Lars and the team instead positioned Oatly as a handmade product. The brand’s packaging has a screen printed appearance with a more “scruffy background,” as he described it, making it feel like a custom crafted beverage and just another milk alternative.Slide-2-hello-future.8_2048x.png


Getting lost in the V&A

As one of the most famous museum’s in the world, the V&A attracts around four million visitors every year. Of those four million, some are first time visitors and some have become regulars, and some are happy just to explore the museum’s permanent collection, while others have come with a specific object or exhibition in mind.

Navigating the South Kensington museum’s three interconnected buildings, seven floors, 60,000 objects, five temporary exhibition spaces, four shops and three cafés is no mean feat even for the hardiest of gallery goers, meaning that its wayfinding system is an integral part of the overall visitor experience.

“Our brief was to facilitate an outstanding visitor experience, enabling people, whatever their interests, to explore the museum with confidence and curiosity. It was not just about getting people from A to B, but encouraging visitors to go beyond the ground floor, and discover lesser-known parts of the building and the rest of the museum’s collection,” says dn&co Creative Director Patrick Eley.

“Getting lost in museums is part of the fun – so much so, the shop even sells a keyring stamped triumphantly with the tag ‘Lost in the V&A’. But when you can’t find your way out, or more importantly to the toilet, it becomes frustrating and disorientating,” Eley adds.Black and white remain the core colour palette, while any extra colours have been stripped out except to highlight the museum’s paid exhibitions. “Acting as a beacon, these colours draw visitors through the busy ground floor getting them to their destinations faster, protecting one of the museum’s core revenue streams that help keep the permanent galleries free to enter,” says Eley.

One of the other key changes is a new map, which has been redrawn to work across digital platforms and environments as well as in print. Walls are now drawn as solid barriers, galleries are named as well as numbered, awkward cross-referencing has been removed and type sizes have been increased, all while making the map larger, more relevant and more compact to carry around.“Since the building is so vast, we took a city wayfinding approach,” says Eley. “People always need more help when a destination is out of sight, so similar to finger posts in an urban environment we introduced signs at the thresholds between spaces to reassure visitors they were still on the right route. They’re a bit like the breadcrumb trail in Hansel and Gretel, or the Theseus’ string in the Minotaur’s maze.”

VW repurposed classic ads

Repurposing ads like Lemon and Think Small, originally created by Doyle Dane Bernbach around the early 1960s, the designs preserve the playful tone used in the originals while putting forward VW’s new stance on sustainability. The campaign is the first by the brand’s newly enlisted US agency Johannes Leonardo, and marks a shift in focus to electric that’s as long overdue as its apology campaign.

 

As part of the effort to make amends with the public and redeem some of its reputation, VW has also released a film directed by Daniel Wolfe of Somesuch showing the car manufacturer going back to the drawing board. Titled Hello Light, the film is soundtracked by Simon and Garfunkel’s The Sound of Silence – an interesting choice given the song is probably more commonly associated with Alfa Romeo than VW, thanks to The Graduate.

On the whole, it does a good job of implying a sense of remorse while giving a nod to a time when VW – or at least the perception of it – was arguably at its most powerful. However, critics are still sceptical over whether it’s enough, particularly in the absence of one five letter word that begins with ‘S’.